Emergency Contacts

Tasmanian Department of Health

Introduction

The Department of Health is responsible for hospitals, ambulances, community health, and related areas such as primary healthcare.

Components

Top tasks

Information for your trip to hospital

If you attend a hospital for medical treatment, you will attend as either an:

  • Outpatient – if you receive medical treatment or care but are not ‘admitted’ to stay in the hospital. For example, you receive scans like an x-ray, need to see a specialist doctor based in the hospital or some visits to the emergency department.
  • Inpatient – if you are formally ‘admitted’ to hospital by a doctor who decides that you need care in a hospital. If you need surgery or intensive care, you will usually be assigned a bed in a ward or a room. Sometimes if you attend the emergency department you can be admitted as an inpatient if you need ongoing care.

If you’re not sure whether you’re being admitted, please check with your doctor.

What you need to know about going to hospital

There are several things that you should bring to your hospital visit, these are listed below.

Some are important to help us treat you and some will help make your stay more comfortable.

Please do not bring valuable items with you. The hospital will not accept responsibility for any items lost, stolen or damaged during your stay.

Personal information

  • Your admission advice and completed admission form.
  • Your Medicare card, Pension card and Healthcare card
  • Your Repatriation File Number if you are eligible for repatriation treatment
  • your WorkCover detail (if this applies to you).
  • Details of any health insurance cover you hold, including your Health Insurance Book
  • The name and contact number for your next of kin. This is the person we call in case of an emergency.
  • Any current advance health directive you have made. This is a legal document you may have made to tell us your health care wishes.
  • Any enduring power of attorney. This is a legal document you may have made to appoint someone like a trusted family member or friend to make health care decisions on your behalf.

Health information

  • Information about any allergies you may have to medication or foods. Please tell nursing staff as soon as possible so they can issue you with a special identification band and put alerts in your medical record.
  • All current medications in their original containers.
  • A list of any recent medications that you have taken.
  • Any medications, vitamins, herbs or supplements not prescribed by your doctor. You may have purchased these from a pharmacy, naturopath, health food shop or via the internet.
  • Dentures – please ask nursing staff for a container to store them in so they do not get lost or damaged. This container will be labelled for you.
  • Any medical aids. Please tell nursing staff if you wear a hearing aid.
  • Any x-rays or treatment information from other health professionals.

Some personal items

  • Comfortable sleepwear (dressing gown, pyjamas, nightgown, slippers).
  • Personal hygiene items (soap, toothbrush, toothpaste, brush, comb, tissues, shaving equipment, women’s products like tampons or sanitary pads).
  • Your mobile phone and charger or some coins for phone calls.
  • Books, magazines, mobile devices (for example a tablet or laptop) and children’s toys.

What to bring for an outpatient appointment

On the day of your appointment, please bring:

  • the appointment letter you received in the mail from the Outpatient Clinic
  • any x-rays, scans (CT or ultrasound), blood tests or other test results
  • a list of current medications
  • reading glasses if you need them
  • your Medicare card, private health insurance card, pension card (if you have one) and any other concession card you may hold
  • any questions you may have for the health professionals – you may want to write these down prior to your appointment.

Please arrive about 10 minutes before your appointment starts to allow enough time to check in with reception staff.  After you have checked in, you will then be shown to the waiting area for your Outpatient Clinic.

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If you are admitted to hospital, you will be given the option to be treated as either a public or a private patient.

Choosing to be a public or private patient

Depending on what you choose and if you hold private health insurance cover, there are different fees and room types. It also impacts if you can choose your own doctor or not.

 

Public patient

Private patient
With health fund insurance

Private patient
Without health fund insurance

Doctor

You will be treated by doctors that the hospital chooses for you.

You will be treated by doctors that you choose if they have a right to practice at the hospital you are being treated at.

As an inpatient, you may claim any diagnostic tests through Medicare, but you will be required to pay the difference (gap) from your own funds.

Fees

You will not be charged for any medical or other hospital services.

You must pay all hospital accommodation fees.

You must pay for all medical services and prostheses (artificial body parts like a limb or breast implant).

You must pay all hospital accommodation fees.

You must pay for all medical services and prostheses (artificial body parts like a limb or breast implant).

Diagnostic tests are paid for by Medicare and your private health fund.

Room Type

You cannot occupy a bed in a single room.

Depending on your level of cover, your private insurance may pay for some of your costs.

Your private health insurance will usually cover the full cost of shared ward accommodation.

Costs will vary depending on the hospital.

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If you require an appointment as an outpatient, you will be advised by your GP, specialist doctor, other health professional or prior to discharge from hospital if you need ongoing care. This is called a referral.

How to book an outpatient appointment

  • Your health professional will write referral letter with information about why you need the appointment.
  • A health professional reviews the referral and prioritises your appointment based on this information.
  • A letter will be sent to you with your appointment date or advising you that you are on a wait list.
  • You may receive other letters relating to your appointment if necessary. For some Outpatient Clinics an SMS reminder will be sent if you have provided a mobile number.
  • Sometimes you can refer yourself to be an outpatient if this individual clinic allows this option. Please contact the clinic for more information about how to self-refer.

Changing or cancelling your appointment

  • It is important to keep your appointment for the best ongoing care and treatment of your medical condition.
  • If you need to change or cancel an appointment, please contact the Outpatient Clinic that you will be attending to organise another appointment. 
  • Calling the Outpatient Clinic to cancel or change any appointments you cannot attend allows us to offer it to another patient and reduce waitlist times.
  • If you fail to attend your appointment or notify the Outpatient Clinic, you may be discharged. This means that should you or your health professional request another appointment, a new referral letter is required.

What to do if you are on a waiting list

  • If you are on a waiting list, you may wish to speak to the person who referred you to discuss other treatment options.
  • If your condition changes or you have any health problems while waiting for your appointment, please see your GP or the person that referred you.

Preparing for your appointment

What to bring:

  • the appointment letter you received in the mail from the Outpatient Clinic
  • any relevant x-rays, scans (CT or ultrasound), blood tests or other test results
  • a list of current medications
  • reading glasses if you need them
  • your Medicare card, private health insurance card, pension card (if you have one) and any other concession card you may hold
  • any questions you may have – you may want to write these down prior to your appointment.

Attending your appointment

  • Please arrive approximately 10 minutes prior to your appointment to check-in with reception staff.
  • You will then be directed to the waiting area for your Outpatient Clinic.
  • Please allow up to two hours for your appointment.
  • Sometimes delays occur. This may be due to an unexpected longer appointment for another patient or if the health professional is urgently required elsewhere.

What to expect at your appointment

  • Your health professional may ask specific questions about your health, wellbeing, medical condition and/or treatment.
  • It is important to provide them with as much information as possible, even if you are unsure if it is relevant. This helps the doctor plan the best course of treatment for you.
  • You may ask the health professional questions at any time. If you don't understand anything, please ask for it to be explained again.
  • If you need a medical certificate for work or other reasons, please request one during your appointment.

How much your outpatient appointment will cost

  • If you are an Australian resident and have your Outpatient Clinic appointments in a public hospital in Tasmania, it is usually covered by Medicare. This means there are no out-of-pocket expenses.
  • Fees may apply if you are an overseas resident or pursuing a compensation claim.
  • You may be charged for pharmacy items or medical supplies and equipment. If fees apply, you will be advised by that service. Please tell them if you hold a concession card as it may reduce any costs.

Learn more about fees and charges

After your appointment

Following your appointment, you will need to check if you have:

  • any follow-up outpatient appointments
  • any medicines and prescriptions
  • arrangements in place for any community support services
  • any equipment or aids you need at home.

Your doctor will talk to you about your after-care. It is important you understand the after-care you need. This helps keep you well and helps to prevent any further medical problems.

Before you leave the hospital make sure that you:

  • understand the treatment you were given and what care you require
  • know what medicines you need to take and why
  • know when you need to see a doctor again and who to see (your general practitioner, the specialist or outpatient clinic)
  • ask if you need a medical certificate, a letter for your general practitioner or Work Cover information
  • take all your belongings with you including any x-rays you brought into the hospital
  • have made arrangements for your travel home.

Travelling home

Patients are responsible for making their own travel arrangements home. Only patients needing medical help, such as patients on oxygen, can be transported home by ambulance.

Make arrangements for someone to help you get home as soon as you know the date you will be leaving hospital. Alternatively taxi ranks are situated outside most major hospitals.

If specialist medical or dental services are not available in your local area then you may be eligible for financial help for travel and accommodation. Ask the hospital staff for information about Patient Travel Assistance Scheme.

Recovery

  • It may take some weeks or months to fully recover from an injury or surgery. Ask your doctor how long recovery should take so that you can plan for rest and rehabilitation and follow your doctor’s after-care advice.
  • If you have any concerns about your health after you leave hospital, contact your general practitioner. If you suddenly become unwell, call the hospital ward and speak with the staff, or go to the hospital Emergency Department.

What if I have a compliment or concern about my hospital visit?

  • If you have any feedback about your visit please let us know.
  • While at the hospital, you can speak with the staff or ask to see a Patient Liaison Officer.
  • After leaving the hospital, phone or write to the hospital.

Telehealth appointments

Telehealth is a video appointment with your outpatient health professional and an easy way to have your appointment without having to travel to the clinic or hospital in person.

  • You can have a telehealth appointment from your own home
  • If you need help or don't have access to video conferencing, you can come to your local health centre or GP surgery for a telehealth appointment.
  • You can ask family members, carers or friends to sit in on the appointment with you.
  • Your health professional will decide if it is okay for you to have a telehealth appointment.
  • If you need to have a physical examination, then you may need to attend in person.

Benefits of telehealth appointments

Having a telehealth appointment may:

  • give you better access to healthcare
  • make it easier for family or friends to attend appointments with you
  • reduce your travel costs, time away from home or time you need to take off from work

How to book your telehealth appointment

Telehealth Tasmania provide you with help to make your appointment or if you need help to use the video link.

Contact Telehealth Tasmania on 1300 027 894 or email [email protected]

What if I can’t get telehealth or speak to my doctor?

  • For free health advice 24-hours a day, please visit the HealthDirect website or call 1800 022 222.
  • Healthdirect is a government-funded service, providing quality, approved health information and advice

Resources are also available in Arabic, Bengali, Chinese Simplified, Chinese Traditional and Vietnamese.

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When to visit an emergency department

  • Life-threatening conditions – call 000 (triple zero) and ask for an ambulance
  • Non-life-threatening conditions – consider seeking phone advice first.

Locations of emergency departments in Tasmania

In Tasmania, you can get emergency care in all public hospitals and in some private hospitals.

Public hospital emergency departments

Private hospital emergency departments

Some private hospitals have Emergency Departments available to everyone at a cost.

Other services that can help you in an emergency

HealthDirect

Free health advice, 24-hours a day:

Tas After Hours

For medical care at night or on the weekend, visit the Tas After Hours website.

Poisons Information Centre

If you think someone has taken an overdose, made an error with medicine or been poisoned:

Mental health support

If you need to talk to someone at any time, please call a crisis support service:

Preparing to visit the emergency department

  • In most cases you can bring one person to come to support you. Please ensure your children are accompanied by a parent or responsible adult.
  • Please don't eat or drink anything before coming in case you need tests or surgery. These may require you to have an empty stomach.
  • Bring your food with you and check with staff before eating it.

What to bring with you

  • A list of your medications or the medications themselves.
  • Your GP’s details if you have one.
  • Your Medicare card (or your passport if you are not an Australian citizen).
  • Your pension or concession card (if you have one).
  • Your private health insurance details (if you have any).
  • Food, bottles, nappies, extra clothing and a toy if you are bringing babies or children.
  • A book, magazine or something to entertain you and your children while you wait.
  • Money for a taxi home if you are arriving by ambulance.
  • Please try not to bring valuables other than your mobile phone.

What happens when you arrive

Please see the triage nurse first. They will ask you some questions and may examine you. They work out which patients need to be seen first and in what order. It is important to tell the triage nurse the following:

  • if a GP or other health professional asked you to attend the emergency department
  • any medications you or your children are taking
  • any allergies you or your children may have
  • any immunisations (vaccines) that you or your child have had
  • if you are pregnant or breastfeeding
  • if you have recently travelled overseas
  • if you need an interpreter.

After you have seen the triage nurse you will register with one of the clerical staff. They will ask you for your:

  • contact details for you and your next of kin
  • GP's contact details
  • Medicare card (or passport if you are not an Australian citizen)
  • private health insurance details (if you have any)
  • your preferred language
  • your cultural and religious background.

How long you may have to wait

The emergency department is a busy place. Although we do our best to see you as soon as possible, sometimes you will have to wait.

  • Patients are seen in order of the urgency of care they require, not in order of arrival.
  • Arriving by ambulance or being sent to the emergency department by a health professional won't change how quickly you are seen.
  • Even if the waiting room does not appear busy, it may be very busy inside the emergency department.
  • If you are feeling worse or are in pain while you wait, please tell the triage nurse.
  • If you feel better or want to see your GP instead, you can leave at any time. Please talk with the triage nurse before leaving.

What happens when you are getting treated

  • Often a nurse will begin your assessment and treatment before you see a doctor.
  • Once you have been allocated a cubicle you may be asked to undress and change into a gown.
  • Your assessment may require tests such as blood tests and x-rays.
  • Please be aware that your treatment time will take longer than a visit to a GP as you may be waiting for test results and to be seen by different people.
  • Sometimes staff may be called away to treat a life-threatening emergency or more urgent case.
  • You will be involved in decisions about your treatment. Please ask if you don’t understand what is happening at any time.
  • You may be admitted even if only a brief stay is required.
  • If a longer stay is required, you will be admitted to a hospital ward under the care of a treating team.

Other things to know about visiting an emergency department

Eating and drinking

Please check with the triage nurse before you eat or drink anything. Some surgeries and tests require you to have an empty stomach.

Mobile phones

Mobile phones can be used in the emergency department. However, for privacy, no photos or videos can be taken at any time.

Smoking

Smoking is not permitted in the hospital or anywhere on hospital grounds, including the ramp in front of the Emergency Department. If you need help with quitting smoking, find out more here.

Belongings and valuables

You must take care of things you bring with you. These include valuable items like jewellery, money, watches and phones. The hospital is not responsible if your things are lost, damaged or stolen.

Safety and behaviour

Threatening, abusive or violent behaviour is not tolerated. You will be asked to leave by security staff or the police.

Visitors

The safety of our patients, visitors and staff is very important and by restricting visitors we are taking measures that align with public health advice to prevent the potential spread and impact of COVID-19. Each hospital page will provide the latest information.

Children

Please ensure your children are always be accompanied by a parent or responsible adult.

Language and cultural services

Please tell staff on arrival if:

  • you need an interpreter
  • are deaf or hard of hearing
  • are of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander descent
  • are a refugee or migrant.

What happens after your visit

Most people can go home once their treatment in the emergency department is complete.

Before leaving

Please ensure you:

  • understand the treatment you were given and what ongoing treatment you require
  • know when you need to see a health professional again and who (such as your GP, a specialist or an outpatient clinic)
  • have obtained a medical or workers compensation certificate if you need one
  • taken all your belongings with you.

Transport

You need to arrange your own transport home. Ambulances cannot take you. Please arrange to have someone collect you or you can book a taxi.

After your visit

  • Your GP should receive an electronic summary of your visit soon after you leave.
  • Sometimes you will be recommended to have further tests (for example blood tests or x-rays).

How much emergency department treatment costs   

  • Treatment is free to Medicare cardholders.
  • You may have to pay for services if you do not hold a Medicare card.
  • Visitors from some countries can also access free emergency department treatment with their passports. Find out which countries and more at Services Australia.

How to provide feedback on your visit

  • If you want to tell us about the services and care you had, you can contact us.
  • All complaints are taken very seriously with a full investigation carried out.
  • If you are unhappy with the outcome of your complaint you may wish to contact the Health Complaints Commissioner on 1800 001 170.
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When you make an appointment at an outpatient clinic or for elective surgery, you may be put on a waitlist.  A waitlist is a system to work out when you will be seen. It prioritises appointments in order of the urgency of patient medical needs.

  • Your doctor will write you a letter called a ‘referral’ to book your outpatient clinic appointment.
  • The clinic will review your referral and place you on a waitlist.
  • The time you will wait depends on how urgent the health conditions are of you and other patients.

How long you will wait for your appointment

  • Some clinics and services have short waiting times. Some are longer due to demand and resources.
  • If your condition may be life-threatening, we will prioritise your appointment. Please ask your doctor to call us.

What to do if your condition gets worse?

Until you have your appointment, it is important to have ongoing care with your referring doctor.

If there are any changes to your condition, they will call the outpatient clinic to:

  • request that you go into a more urgent category for a sooner appointment
  • cancel your appointment if it is no longer needed.
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What you need to know

We will take good care of you when you stay in one of our hospitals and do our best to make you feel comfortable. The following information will help you understand what your stay will be like and plan your stay.

Download a brochure to help you keep safe during your stay in hospital

Checking in at the hospital

When you first arrive at hospital, you will need to check-in.

  • When you arrive at the hospital, please go directly to the reception area in the foyer of the hospital. They will tell you where to go.
  • If you are having a baby, please go directly to the maternity ward.
  • If it’s an emergency, please go straight to the emergency department.

What happens when you check-in

When you check-in, we will ask you to provide us information. You can prepare most of this before your visit.

Personal information

  • Your admission advice and completed admission form.
  • Your address and phone number
  • Details of your doctor and other health professionals that you see.
  • Name and contact number for your next of kin. This is the person to call in case of an emergency.
  • Your Medicare card or number, Pension card and Healthcare card
  • Your Repatriation File Number if you are eligible for repatriation treatment
  • Your WorkCover detail (if appropriate).
  • Your private health insurance details if you have it including your Health Insurance Book
  • Let us know if you’d like an interpreter to help you.
  • Let us know if you would like an Indigenous health worker to help you.

Health information

  • Your medical history and condition.
  • Information about any allergies you may have to medication or foods. Please tell nursing staff as soon as possible so they can issue you with a special identification band and place alerts in your medical record.
  • All current medications in their original containers.
  • A list of any recent medications that you have taken.
  • Any medications, vitamins, herbs or supplements not prescribed by your doctor. You may have purchased these from a pharmacy, naturopath, health food shop or via the internet.
  • Dentures – please ask nursing staff for a container to store them in so they do not get lost or damaged. This container will be labelled for you.
  • Any medical aids. Please tell nursing staff if you wear a hearing aid.
  • Any x-rays or treatment information from other health professionals.
  • Any current advance health directive you have made. This is a legal document you may have made to tell us your health care wishes.
  • Any enduring power of attorney. This is a legal document you may have made to appoint someone like a trusted family member or friend to make health care decisions on your behalf.

Patient identification band

We will then issue you a patient identification band to wear on your wrist or ankle.

  • Please check the information is correct.
  • Please wear this band all times until you leave the hospital.
  • It quickly gives all staff important information about your medications, treatments and procedures.

Personal belongings

  • You’ll have a bedside locker next to your bed. You can store your personal items here.
  • Please don’t bring any valuable items with you to hospital.
  • We’re not responsible for any lost or damaged items that belong to you, your family or any visitors.

What you can eat in hospital

  • You will be provided with a choice of meals and a variety of menu plans.
  • Menus are generally delivered with breakfast and collected between 9:30am to 12:00 noon.
  • You may be prescribed a special diet by your doctor as part of your treatment.
  • If you are normally on a special diet at home or have a specific food allergy, please tell the nursing staff. We can arrange a dietician to speak with you.
  • If you’re having an operation, you may not be able to eat or drink for several hours. This is called fasting. This means all foods and fluids, including chewing gum, lollies, and water.
  • Your ward staff will tell you how long you need to fast before your operation. This is for your safety. Make sure you tell us if you haven’t followed this instruction.
  • If you need your food prepared in a special way due to your religion or personal preferences, please let our staff know.
  • Food you are able to bring from home and places to eat will vary depending on the hospital. You can find out more on our hospital pages, or by contacting the hospital you are visiting.

Medications in the hospital

While you are in hospital you may be given some medications as part of your treatment. Speak to your doctor, nurse or pharmacist about your medications. They’re happy to answer your questions.

You could ask:

  • what is the medication supposed to do?
  • how do I take it?
  • how long do I keep taking it?
  • should I avoid certain food, drinks or other medications?
  • what if I miss a dose?
  • are there any side effects and what should I do if they occur?
  • how do I store this medication?

Medications that you are currently taking             

  • Please bring any medications and supplements that you take, or have taken recently, with you to hospital. This will assist the medical staff in your care.
  • This includes anything that you may have purchased from a pharmacy, supermarket or health food store.
  • Please also bring any eye drops, puffers, patches or creams/ointments that you are using. These medications will be checked by hospital staff and stored safely until you are ready to leave.
  • Do not take your own medications while you are an inpatient, unless you are specifically told to by your nurse, pharmacist or doctor. The hospital provides most of the medications you will require.

Smoking, alcohol and drugs

  • You are not allowed to bring cigarettes, tobacco, alcohol or illicit drugs to the hospital.
  • Illicit drugs are those are illegal to possess or use or legal drug used in a way that is against the law.
  • Smoking, drinking of alcohol and taking illicit drugs is not allowed in any of our hospitals.
  • You can’t smoke, drink alcohol or take illicit drugs on the premises or the grounds.
  • These rules also apply to your visitors and all staff, other patients, contractors and other people who enter our buildings, grounds or vehicles.

Television, internet, mobile devices and computers

  • Overhead televisions are available for hire in our hospitals. Please enquire about details when you arrive to be admitted.
  • Please do not bring your own electrical appliances, including televisions.
  • Availability of free wi-fi and internet access will vary depending on the hospital. Please visit our hospital pages for more information.

Types of support services to help you in hospital

There are different types of services and people to help support you during your stay in hospital. Please ask our staff to arrange for any of these services for you.

Counselling and spiritual care

Illness, injury and time in hospital can be difficult for you and your family. We have social workers and multi-faith hospital chaplains who can talk with you to support you during your treatment and recovery. Read about counselling and spiritual care.

Interpreter services

We have interpreter services at all Tasmanian hospitals for people who are hearing impaired or have difficulty communicating in English. Read about interpreter services available.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander support

If you are Aboriginal or a Torres Strait Islander, we have liaison officers who can provide cultural support and advice to your, your families and carers. Read about the Aboriginal and Torres Straight Islander support available.

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What you need to know

  • Being discharged is what happens when you have finished your treatment and can return home.
  • You will need to leave your ward by 10.00 am on the day of your discharge,
  • In most cases, your doctor will give you 24 hours’ notice prior to your discharge.
  • If you have any belongings or valuables to collect, please speak to the staff before you leave.
  • It is important to arrange someone to pick you up or to organise a taxi.
  • Please ask the staff to assist you if you need any help.

Please refer to the hospital pages for information about transit lounges and patient pick up areas.

Continue care after you leave

  • Any special arrangements for your continued care will be made by hospital staff for you. This may include appointments as an outpatient and information about your medications.
  • When you are discharged, you will receive up to one month’s supply of medication. This will give you time to visit your doctor to arrange further prescriptions. We will send a list of these medicines to your doctor.
  • The pharmacist will explain the reasons for your medications and any possible side effects.
  • We have rooms which can be used for these conversations to maintain your privacy.
  • During busier periods it may take some time to receive your discharge medications.

Paying for medicines

  • You will have to pay some of the cost of this medication if it is dispensed from our hospital pharmacy. This is called a co-payment fee.  
  • The co-payment cost will vary based on the cost of the medication. It may be cheaper if you have a valid concession or entitlement card.
  • The hospital pharmacy will provide you with an invoice. This needs to be paid within 30 days of receiving the medication. There are several payment options, which are detailed on the invoice.
  • You can pay for your medicines at the hospital cashier as you leave the hospital, or pay later at Service Tasmania, via Australia Post, by mail, via BPAY or by phone.
  • If you are having difficulties paying for your medicines supplied by hospital assistance may be available. Please ask about this if you need more information.     

Find out more about medications and costs

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Community and home-based care

If you need help or ongoing care after you have been discharged, please ask the nursing staff. They can help you organise community care or other home care services. These include:

  • nursing care (for example, helping you with medicine or change bandages)
  • personal care (for example, helping you to shower)
  • domestic assistance (for example, gardening, shopping, cleaning)
  • allied health (for example, physiotherapists and occupational therapists).
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Information and services

Support services

Patient Travel Assist Scheme Review

KP Health has independently reviewed Tasmania’s Patient Travel Assistance Scheme. The Tasmanian Government has accepted all 35 recommendations provided in the review.

The Department of Health will now work with members of the public, healthcare providers and private sector providers to progress implementation of the recommendations across 2022-2023.

Download the Review of the Tasmanian Patient Travel Assistance Scheme

Read the Media Release - More support for patients in need of travel assistance

What is the Patient Travel Assistance Scheme (PTAS)?

If you live in Tasmania and need financial support with travel and/or accommodation to receive your medical treatment or care, there is help available. This is called the Patient Travel Assistance Scheme (PTAS).

PTAS provides financial assistance with travel and/or accommodation costs for Tasmanian residents to access a range of specialist medical services, where these services are not available locally.

This is an assistance scheme only and you are expected to make a patient contribution.

Qualifying for the Patient Travel Assistance Scheme

You can receive financial help for travel and/or accommodation if you must travel from a certain distance from where you normally live. There are different distances for different types of medical treatment.

  • If you live more than 50 kilometres (one way) to the nearest oncology or dialysis treatment centre
  • If you live more than 75 kilometres (one way) to the nearest appropriate specialist medical service
  • more than 75 kilometres (one way) to access lymphoedema treatment
  • You can only receive financial support for interstate treatment if it is unavailable in Tasmania.

You must: 

  • be a Tasmanian permanent resident;
  • be travelling by the least expensive form of transport;
  • have a PTAS application form signed by your referring medical specialist, oral/maxillofacial surgeon or rural GP referring you to the nearest appropriate specialist;
  • be receiving treatment claimable under Medicare from a recognised medical specialist; and
  • not be entitled to financial assistance through another scheme e.g. Motor Accident Insurance Board (MAIB), Department of Veterans Affairs (DVA), Workers Compensation, or other compensable schemes.

What are my responsibilities in applying for PTAS?

It is your responsibility to:

  • submit the PTAS application form to your local PTAS Office as soon as the application form is completed by your referring medical specialist or rural GP;
  • ensure Section C of the PTAS application form is completed by the nominated specialist;
  • travel and attend any medical appointment as arranged;
  • give adequate notice if unable to travel; and
  • provide up-to-date contact details and bank account details if payment of the subsidy is expected.

Costs of PTAS

Learn about costs for:

  • travelling within Tasmania
  • travelling outside of Tasmania
  • how much we will pay for travel and accommodation, and how much you will pay.

Read about PTAS costs

Frequently asked questions

Download an FAQ booklet for patients.

Download an FAQ booklet for medical practitioners.

    Applying for the Patient Travel Assistance Scheme (PTAS)

    • Download the PTAS Application Form or visit your local PTAS Office or Service Tasmania shop.
    • Please fill in all applicable information in the application form correctly. Incomplete or inaccurate information will lead to delay in the process.
    • Submit your applications by email, fax, post or deliver in person to your local PTAS office.
    • You will need Adobe Acrobat Reader on your computer to fill out and submit the form online.

    How to submit your application by email

    • Complete the form by typing directly into the boxes provided.
    • Save the completed form with a new file name – Patient's first name_Patient's last name.
    • Choose the ‘Print Form’ button to prepare a copy for your records.
    • Click the ‘Submit by Email’ to send the completed form.

    How to submit your application by fax, post or in-person

    • Choose the ‘Print Form’ button to print an application form
    • Complete the form
    • Fax or post or bring the completed form to your local PTAS office

    PTAS Office locations and contact details

    Region Contact Details
    PTAS South

    Royal Hobart Hospital

    C/- K Block
    Ground Floor
    Campbell Street, Hobart 7000

    Phone: 03 6166 8225

    Fax: 03 6173 0321

    Switchboard Phone: 03 6166 8308

    Launceston General Hospital

    Charles Street, Launceston 7250

    Phone: 03 6777 6249

    Fax: 03 6777 5238

    Switchboard Phone: 03 6777 6777

    North-West Regional Hospital

    North-West Regional Hospital

    C/ Parkside Building

    Strahan Street, Burnie 7320

    Phone: 03 6477 7734

    Fax: 03 6434 6998

    Switchboard Phone: 03 6493 6000

    Other PTAS Coordinators

    Coordinator Contact Details

    Devonport Community and Health Services Centre

    23 Steele Street, Devonport 7310

    Phone: 03 6478 6177

    West Coast District Hospital

    60–64 Orr Street, Queenstown 7467

    Rosebery Community Health Centre

    Murchison Highway, Rosebery 7470

    Phone: 03 6495 1570

    Smithton District Hospital

    74 Brittons Road, Smithton 7330

    Phone: 03 6478 9520

    King Island Hospital and Health Centre

    31 Edward Street Currie, King Island 7256

    Phone: 03 6462 9900

    Where can I find out more?

    To discuss PTAS eligibility requirements or benefits, please call your nearest PTAS Coordinator. 

    You can also get information from:

    • Service Tasmania
    • Primary Health Facilities.

    Information available to download

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    Aboriginal Health Liason Office

    If you are an Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander, you can ask for an Aboriginal Health Liaison Officer (AHLO) to help you while you are in hospital.

    Their job is to provide you and your family with:

    • emotional, social and cultural support before, during and after your stay in hospital
    • being a contact between you and your medical staff
    • help to plan your discharge and access to other services
    • answer your questions about your treatment and follow-up care.
    • The AHLO service is confidential and available to both patients and their families.

    Other important work of an Aboriginal Health Liaison Officer 

    Aboriginal Health Liaison Officers also do important work in Tasmania to:

    • improve health care services for Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander people
    • provide education/information to hospital staff to learn more Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander culture
    • maintain positive relationships within the Aboriginal community, Aboriginal organisations, other service providers and government departments.

    How to arrange an Aboriginal Health Liaison Officer (AHLO)

    • The AHLO is available Monday to Friday, 8:30am to 5:00pm.
    • Please contact the hospital you are visiting or speak to your nursing staff for AHLO contact information.
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    • If you don't speak English or find it hard to hear, an interpreter can help you understand information.
    • An interpreter is a person who can explain things about your care and treatment to you.
    • They can speak in your language or use ways to make it easy for you to understand.
    • They follow a code of ethics to protect you, and all of your information is kept private.
    • The interpreter is there to help you and to help hospital staff provide care for you.

    Requesting an interpreter

    • You can request an interpreter at any time.   
    • We provide professional interpreters, free of charge to assist you in all Tasmanian hospitals.
    • On-site interpreters are supplied for all outpatient and inpatient appointments
    • Where no on-site interpreter can attend, or if you prefer, we will arrange one via telephone or video call.
    • Interpreters tell you everything that is said from English into your language, and do not add, change, or remove information.

    How to book an interpreter

    When booking your appointment, let the clinic or hospital know you need an interpreter and for which language, and they will arrange one for you.

    Components

    Frequently asked questions

    No. interpreters are free of charge, even if you do not have a Medicare card or private health insurance.

    No. Any information discussed during your appointment will not be shared outside of the hospital.

    If you are unsure, you can tell the doctor or nurse and they will try to explain to you in another way.

    The interpreter will tell the staff member if they are unable to speak with you and another interpreter will be arranged.

    To provide feedback with a telephone interpreter, please call TIS National on  131 450 and ask to be connected to Interpreter Services on 6166 7000.

    If you wish to make a formal complaint, please contact the Consumer Liaison Unit on 1800 811 911.

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    We have a team of people in our hospitals who provide spiritual, emotional and pastoral support. They are called Chaplains and Pastoral Care Workers and regularly visit the hospital wards. They can:

    • represent a variety of faith traditions, cultures and language groups
    • connect you to a religious cleric or spiritual leader of your choice.

    Reasons to speak with a chaplain

    You may wish to meet with a chaplain if:

    • you would like someone with time to listen to your story and your feelings
    • you would like to talk to someone not involved in caring for your medical needs
    • you have an ethical question about what is right and wrong or a hard decision
    • you're having surgery and would like support for yourself or your loved ones
    • you or someone you love is facing death or has passed away
    • you would like to talk about spiritual matters
    • you would like someone to pray with you
    • you would like to receive a sacred ritual like communion, a blessing, baptism, marriage or funeral
    • you would like a community faith person to visit but don't know how to contact them.

    How to speak with a chaplain or pastoral support worker

    Please speak to your nursing staff and they can arrange a chaplain or pastoral care worker to visit you.

     

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    What is TasEquip?

    TasEquip is the Department’s state-wide equipment scheme that has warehouses in all regions.

    We provide a range of assistive technology to eligible Tasmanians to improve their ability to safely engage in basic, everyday tasks, to transition home from acute care or to access mandated education settings.

    TasEquip provides equipment options for eligible clients who require equipment to support basic, everyday tasks which cannot be met by a non-assistive equipment solution and do not have access to other funding sources to support them in their home environment or at school (Equipment Library).

    Equipment you can access

    TasEquip uses a refurbishment model and not all items will be new when issued.

    Access to TasEquip resources is only through prescription by an authorised prescriber. Clinical priorities apply, and there is a funding cap for new equipment purchases.

    Download equipment loan - information for clients brochure >

    Download equipment use and care instruction brochures

    Read about student equipment needs in school

    Who can access TasEquip?

    We provide equipment to:

    • permanent Tasmanian residents
    • who have proven financial need for assistance to access the range of equipment we offer.

    To be eligible, clients need to be:

    1. A Centrelink benefit recipient – Health Care, Pensioner Concession, and
    2. Living in the community, and
    3. Ineligible for Home Care Package level 3 or 4, Workers Compensation, MAIB, DVA* or NDIS**.

    Those who do not meet the above eligibility criteria may, in certain restricted circumstances still be able to access equipment through TasEquip. If they are unable to source the equipment privately and if either of the following apply:

    1. Equipment is required for discharge from public hospital or public bed in private hospital
    2. They are a client of the Specialist Palliative Care Service, or have a prognosis of less than 6 months.

    If you are not eligible for TasEquip, you should always consider the option to privately hire or purchase.

    * DVA Health Cardholders

    Should contact DVA to check their potential eligibility.

    **NDIS Participants

    1. Contact the NDIS for all repair, replacement and modification to any disability-related equipment, even if that equipment was originally sourced from TasEquip.
    2. If you are under the age of 65 and have a disability it is essential that you contact the NDIS to determine your eligibility.
    3. You can contact the National Disability Insurance Agency, (NDIA) on 1800 800 110 or [email protected]. They can provide advice about eligibility for the NDIS, how to access the scheme or answer any questions about an NDIS plan.

    Read a fact sheet on NDIS equipment and services

    How do you access TasEquip?

    How to access equipment

    Access to TasEquip resources is only through prescription by an authorised prescriber. Clinical priorities apply, and there is a funding cap for new equipment purchases.

    Authorised Prescribers

    Authorised Prescribers are health professionals who have undertaken the required TasEquip training, who prescribe within their professional scope.

    Clinical decision making when prescribing equipment is the responsibility of the prescriber.

    To become an Authorised Prescriber please contact TasEquip for access to the required training and paperwork.

    How much does it cost?

    Clients are required to pay the following fees, as of 1 July 2017:

    • Loan fee - $50 for one or more items for any period up to a year.
    • Repair fee - a one off $50/a year towards any new replacement part.
    • Replacement cost of wheelchair batteries, tyres and tubes when they need replacing.

    Contact us

    Contact us on 1300 827 378  or directly to the regional warehouse below:

    TasEquip

    Business Hours: 8:00 am to 4:00 pm Monday to Friday (excluding public holidays).

    Region

    Contact Details

    Head Office

    Phone: 1300 827 378

    Hobart

    Repatriation Centre, 90 Davey Street, Hobart

    Phone: 03 6166 7393

    Email: [email protected]      

    Launceston

    3/213 Wellington Street, Launceston (until 13 June 2022)

    From 13 June 2022 we will be in the following location

    53 Dowling Street, Launceston
    Old Becks Hardware Building
    Entrance off Henry Street

    Phone and email details remain unchanged.

    Phone: 03 6777 4336

    Email: [email protected]      

    Latrobe

    Mersey Community Hospital,
    Moriarty Rd, Latrobe.

    Phone: 03 6478 5599

    Email: [email protected]   

    TasEquip Equipment Library

    Repat Centre, 90 Davey Street, Hobart

    (Education Facilities only)

    Phone: 03 6166 2707

    Email: [email protected]

    Components

    Frequently asked questions

    There are three possible invoices that you can receive from TasEquip.

    Loan fee

    TasEquip operates a loan scheme and most invoices are the annual loan fee.  This loan fee applies to all clients who have TasEquip equipment. It is $50 for one or more pieces of equipment for up to a year.  Each year at the anniversary of your loan, if you still have equipment, you will receive another invoice.

    If you no longer need the equipment loaned to you please return it to TasEquip.

    Repair fee

    Should expensive replacement parts be required for a complex piece of equipment that you have on loan from TasEquip (such as power wheelchairs, hoists and electric beds) TasEquip will invoice you a $50 repair fee towards those parts.  This fee can only be invoiced once a year and is a flat fee regardless of the cost of the replacement part.

    This invoice does not apply to all equipment.   If you have any questions please do not hesitate to call your local warehouse.

    Tyres, Tubes and Batteries

    The replacement costs of tyres, tubes and batteries are the responsibility of the user.  If TasEquip arranges the replacement of them for you, TasEquip will pass on the purchase price of tyres, tubes and batteries to you. No labour costs are included.

    You can pay by credit card, on line, or take your invoice to any Australia Post or Service Tasmania outlet. TasEquip is no longer able to accept cash or cheques.

    It is strongly advised that when you no longer need your equipment, please return it to TasEquip as soon as possible.

    If you return your equipment within 7 days of initially receiving it, we can cancel your invoice. However, if you have had it longer than 7 days, the loan fee applies.

    If you have had the equipment for longer than a year, a new invoice for the next year is generated on the anniversary of the date when you first received the equipment.

    It is advised that, if you no longer require your equipment, you return it prior to that date to avoid another invoice.

    TasEquip does not manage CPAP machines, oxygen nebulizers or suction units.  It is recommended that you contact the respiratory clinic at your regional hospital or the hospital that arranged the equipment for you.

    Pharmacy and ambulance account enquiries can be addressed by the finance department on 6166 3865 and selecting the correct option at the prompt.

    Crutches are no longer a loan item subject to a loan fee.  They are now a sale item from the hospital.  Please direct all crutches invoice enquiries to the hospital that issued you with the crutches.

    This can occur in two possible instances:

    • You have several pieces of equipment on loan, and have returned some but not all of them

    The $50 annual loan fee applies for one or more pieces of equipment.  You will continue to receive this invoice until all items of equipment are returned to TasEquip.

    • You have returned all of the equipment but the record is incomplete

    TasEquip has recently changed computer systems and there has been some discrepancy in data.  TasEquip is correcting the discrepancies as they come to light but it may take some time.

    Please contact the warehouse where you returned the equipment.  It is useful if you can identify the equipment you returned and the approximate date.  This will then be investigated and if appropriate the invoice cancelled.

    Having different items of equipment listed on your invoice has no impact on the loan amount.  The $50 loan fee is for one or more items of equipment for up to one year.  Regardless of what items are listed on the invoice as long as you have equipment, you are being invoiced the correct amount.  Please pay your invoice as per normal.

    TasEquip has recently changed computer systems, and there has been some discrepancy in data. TasEquip is correcting the discrepancies as they come to light, but it may take some time.

    TasEquip is now only able to provide health related equipment and not disability related equipment for NDIS participants.

    Contact the NDIS for all repair, replacement and modification to any disability related equipment, even if that equipment was originally sourced from TasEquip.

    If you are under the age of 65 and have a disability it is essential that you contact the NDIS to determine your eligibility now.

    You can contact the National Disability Insurance Agency, (NDIA) on 1800 800 110 or [email protected]. They can provide advice about eligibility for the NDIS, how to access the scheme or answer any questions about an NDIS plan.

    Please see the TasEquip/NDIS fact sheets on the main page of this website.

    When you no longer require the equipment, please clean and return it to any of the sites listed below.

    If you are admitted to an Aged Care Facility please return the equipment.

    North

    TasEquip warehouse

    Hospitals:

    • Deloraine District Hospital
    • Beaconsfield District Health Service
    • Georgetown District Hospital

    Community Health Centre:

    • Campbell Town Multi-Purpose Service
    • Flinders Island Multi-Purpose Service

    South

    TasEquip warehouse

    Community Health Centres:

    • Sorell Community Health Centre
    • Huonville Community Health Centre

    North West

    Hospitals:

    • North West Regional Hospital, Burnie
    • Queenstown, West Coast District Hospital
    • Roseberry
    • Smithton

    Community Health Centres:

    • King Island District Hospital
    • Zeehan Community Health Centre
    • Ulverstone, Central Coast Community Health Centre
    • Burnie Community Health Centre

    Equipment can be returned by you or a member of your family or support team.  If however you have no ability to return equipment please contact your local warehouse to discuss other options.

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    What you need to know

    As a patient it is important to know your rights. This means understanding what services, support and information you are entitled to in hospital.

    A list of your rights as a patient

    • To receive free public hospital services as a public patient.
    • To receive treatment based on your health needs and not how much money you have or if you have insurance
    • To have access to public hospital services regardless of where you live in Australia.
    • To be treated with respect and compassion. This includes keeping your information private and respecting where you come from and your needs and wishes.
    • To participate fully in the decisions about your care. This includes admission to hospital, discharge and arrangements for continuing care.
    • To ask for and receive a clear explanation of the proposed treatment. This includes any risk to you and other options for treatment. It is important that you understand this before you agree to the treatment.
    • To seek a second medical opinion. This means to ask another doctor to review your treatment first.
    • To give your informed consent before a procedure is carried out. This includes giving your permission to allow student medical staff to be involved in your treatment or being part of medical research.
    • To withdraw your consent or refuse further treatment.
    • To have access to information contained in your medical record.
    • To expect that information about your hospital care will be confidential unless the law allows otherwise.
    • To receive interpreter services. This is a person that can help explain things to you if you find it difficult to understand.  

    If you have any concerns about your rights, please contact us.

    How to enjoy better health care

    • Provide information to help health care professionals give you appropriate advice.
    • Consider any decisions about your care seriously. Ask questions if you want more information.
    • Follow all directions of your treatment including taking medication. Please tell your doctor if you won't follow the treatment plan.
    • Conduct yourself in an appropriate way so as not to interfere with the well-being or rights of other patients and health care staff.
    • It is important to be involved in decisions regarding your treatment and health. This means expressing your wishes and needs.
    • Your illness and various treatment options should be discussed with you. This gives you information to say yes or no to treatment if you wish.
    • You may refuse to have any tests, examination procedure or treatment at any time.
    • If you do refuse, you should be given details of the likely or potential outcome of your refusal. If you refuse you cannot hold others responsible for the outcome.
    • You may discharge yourself from the hospital at any time.
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    • By coming to hospital, you have agreed to have examinations and simple tests. Some procedures like operations require consent. This means giving your permission in writing that you understand what is happening and agree to it.
    • Before you sign the consent form, your doctor will explain the treatment or procedure, its effects, likely success, and any alternatives. If you do not understand, ask questions until you are satisfied.

    Consent to being treated by a student or taking part in research

    • The Royal Hobart Hospital, Launceston General Hospital and the North West Regional Hospital are teaching hospitals of the University of Tasmania.
    • They have a responsibility for teaching a wide range of students in the health care professions.
    • Your permission may be asked to help in our education of students and research studies if appropriate.
    • Your permission is required for participation in either of these. You have the right to say no.

    Your right to information

    You have the right to access your personal records, patient files or other personal information held by the hospital and healthcare workers treating you or the Department of Health. Learn more about accessing your personal information.

    A list of your rights accessing outpatient services        

    • To choose to receive public facility services free of charge as a public patient.
    • To be treated based on the urgency of your health needs and receive timely specialist advice
    • To access all public health services equally no matter where you may live in Tasmania.
    • To be treated with respect, dignity and consideration for your privacy, religion, and cultural background.
    • To be provided with an individual appointment time.
    • To have your health condition explained to you in easy-to-understand terms.
    • To know and understand the choices and treatment options available to you.
    • To know what treatment course is being recommended and how this will affect you.
    • To be able to seek another medical opinion, where possible.
    • To be provided with appropriate and easily understood information about your health care.
    • To participate in any decision making regarding your health care.
    • To expect that your personal information remains confidential.
    • To seek access to your own health record. Ask the hospital staff for a booklet that explains how to do this.  
    • To expect that your own doctor will be kept informed of your treatment.
    • To comment on your experience. That includes providing feedback or a complaint.
    • To have an interpreter explain information and assist you to make decisions about your treatment options.

    Learn more about the rights that people can expect when receiving health care on the Australian Commission on Safety and Quality in Health Care website.

    Your responsibilities when accessing outpatient services

    To ensure that your visit runs smoothly there are several things that must do.

    Provide us with complete and accurate details of: 

    • your current address and contact phone numbers
    • your Medicare number and Health Concession card
    • if you need an interpreter or other special assistance to access the service
    • your specific cultural or religious beliefs which may have implications for your health care.
    • Inform as soon as possible if: 
      • you are on a waiting list with another health services for the same health problem
      • you change your address or contact phone numbers
      • you change your GP – provide us with their contact details
      • you no longer require an appointment.
    • Keep any appointments that have been made for you or let us know if you are unable to attend for any reason. Remember that this appointment time could be used for another person needing treatment.
    • Treat all health care staff and other patients with respect, dignity and consideration for their religious and cultural beliefs.
    • Respect the privacy of other patients.
    • Arrive on time for your booked outpatient service appointment.
    • Be active in your treatment. If you do not understand anything about your illness or treatment, ask questions. Staff can provide further support if needed.
    • Do not consent to any treatment that you do not understand – ask questions.
    • Learn more about accessing your personal information and health records in the Personal Information and Medical Records section.
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    We keep personal information about your condition and treatment. This information is kept in medical records. These records may include:

    • test results
    • x-rays
    • scans
    • medical reports
    • surgical or clinical notes.

    Where your records are stored

    • Your medical records may be kept in an online database, as a paper file or a combination of both.
    • Your records are private and confidential.
    • In some situations, your health information will need to be shared between healthcare providers.

    Accessing your medical records through My Health Records

    The easiest way to access your medical records is through My Health Record.

    • My Health Record is an online summary of your important health information.
    • You can access your health information securely online from any device connected to the internet.
    • It helps health professionals easily access your health information like allergies, medicines you take, medical conditions and test results.
    • This is important to getting the right treatment, especially in an accident or emergency.
    • It also is an easy way to record and track your health information over time.
    • If you do not have a My Health Record, you can register for one at any time.
    • You can contact the My Health Record Helpline on 1800 723 471 or visit the My Health Record website.

    Controlling your information

    You can choose to share your health information with the people looking after you. You can also add your own information and choose your privacy and security settings. For example, you can:

    • ask your doctor to also add information
    • ask that some information not be uploaded to your record
    • set access controls to restrict who can and can’t see your health information
    • add personal notes about your allergies and allergic reactions
    • add an advance care plan about your wishes for treatment
    • add notes about who should make health decisions for you if you are unable to
    • set access controls to restrict who can and can’t see your health information
    • review your own health information and see the information your healthcare providers can see
    • set up SMS or email notifications so you know when someone accesses your record
    • ask your doctor to add your health information to your My Health Record.

    The government has set up important technology to make sure your information is secure.

    Information we upload to your My Health Record

    Public hospitals in Tasmania can add some information about your health to your record.

    • This may be details about your discharge from hospital, medication information, diagnostic and pathology reports, outpatient specialist letters and Pharmacy Shared Medicines List.
    • Not all documents will be uploaded every time you receive treatment at a public hospital. Sometimes we use a paper-based process or system not connected to My Health Record.
    • At present, Tasmania’s public hospitals do not upload information to My Health Record for people under 18. This will change soon. 
    • You can find out which hospitals and health providers are using My Health Record on the My Health Record website.

    How My Health Record maintains your privacy and security

    • My Health Record protects your information with special technology and systems.
    • The privacy of your information in the My Health Record system is protected by law.
    • Significant penalties apply for deliberate misuse of this information.
    • For more information on privacy and access controls, you can call the My Health Record Helpline on 1800 723 471 or visit the My Health Record website.

    Giving consent to upload your information to My Health Record Consent

    • When you are treated in public hospital in Tasmania, records about your care may be uploaded to your My Health Record, if you have one.
    • This is called ‘standing consent’. This means you have given your permission.
    • You must tell the hospital if you do not want this information uploaded to your My Health Record. No further information will be uploaded unless you give consent again.
    • You can give consent again at any time.
    • To change your consent, you need to fill out a form.
    • If you want any information removed from your My Health Record, you can do this online or by phoning the My Health Record Helpline on 1800 723 471.

    Where you can get more information about My Health Record

    Visit the My Health Record website

    Accessing your personal information

    How your personal information can be used in Australia is regulated by the law. This means that your information must be used within the law. Personal information about you includes:

    • information or opinion in any recorded format, including photographs and sound and video recordings, about an individual that readily identifies that individual
    • sensitive information
    • health information.

    How to access personal information we hold about you?

    We have prepared an application form to help you apply to access your personal information.

    Download ‘application for access to personal information’ form

    Download ‘consent to share personal information’ form

    For more information about your rights and personal information, please visit our Healthcare Rights and Legislations page. You can also contact the hospital directly. 

    If you are unsure of which operational unit holds your personal information, you can send your form to us by post using the address details below or email [email protected].

    Application for Personal Information
    Strategy, Information Management and Governance Office
    Department of Health
    GPO Box 125
    HOBART TAS 7001

     

    When you will receive your personal information

    • We will contact you promptly after receiving your application.
    • We may need to ask you to provide further information to help them process your application.
    • We will let you know if there are any charges for accessing your information. Information may be withheld until all charges have been paid.
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    • You may wish to provide feedback on your experience, treatment or care at our hospitals.
    • This can be good feedback, suggestions or a complaint.

    Providing feedback

    • Information about providing feedback is located at the front reception within Outpatients Clinics.
    • You may be given an anonymous feedback survey form upon arrival to the clinic.
    • We recommend you directly contact the clinic you attended.
    • Clinic phone numbers can be found in our service finder and are also printed on your appointment letter.

    You can provide feedback on our website

    You can also give feedback by contacting the hospital’s Quality and Patient Safety Service's Consumer Liaison Unit:

    Southern Region

    Northern Region

    North West Region

    The DAISY Award

    The DAISY Award honours nurses and midwives who provide outstanding compassionate care. 

    • The DAISY program runs in 27 countries and more than 4,300 health care facilities.
    • Approximately 125,000 nurses have been honoured from over 1.3 million nominations.
    • For more information, please visit visit the DAISY Foundation website

    The DAISY Award in Tasmania

    How to nominate a Tasmanian nurse or midwife

    If you have been the recipient of or witnessed extraordinary compassionate care by one of our nurses or midwives, you can nominate them for a DAISY Award. Please email us with:

    • their full name
    • unit/ward/area where they work,
    • why you think they deserve to be a DAISY Award honouree.

    South: [email protected]

    North: [email protected]

    North West: [email protected]

    Anonymous satisfaction surveys

    • You may be given a survey to fill out. It is anonymous. This means we don't know it is from you.
    • We ask that you complete this survey and leave it in a designated box prior to your departure.
    • Completion of this survey will assist us in improving the service provided to you and other patients.
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    What you need to know

    • Australian residents do not usually pay for Outpatient Clinic appointments in public hospitals. These services are covered by Medicare.
    • Australian residents do not usually pay for hospital diagnostic tests like blood tests or x-rays in public hospitals. These services are covered by Medicare.
    • Pharmacy, medical supplies or equipment may have a cost. You will be advised by that service.
    • Diagnostic tests like blood tests or x-rays for inpatients are covered by Medicare and your private health insurance fund if you have one. You will have to pay the difference (gap) from your own money.
    • If you choose to be treated as private patient but do not have private health insurance, you will be responsible for the costs of accommodation and some other services.
    • As an inpatient, you may claim any diagnostic tests through Medicare, but please note fees may apply if you are an overseas resident or pursuing a compensation claim.

    Costs not covered by Medicare

    There are some instances where Medicare may not cover your full costs. Learn more at the Australian Department of Health website

    Residential aged care costs

    Health (Fees) Regulations 2017

    The Health (Fees) Regulations 2017 prescribe the fees payable under the Health Act 1997 for certain admitted and non‑admitted patients for hospital services provided to the patient in a public hospital.

    Fees may be charged to the following categories of patients:  

    • admitted and non-admitted private and overseas patients who receive hospital services in a public hospital; and
    • admitted and non-admitted private and public patients who are receiving care or treatment in a public hospital for an injury, illness, or disease by way of a claim for compensation or damages under workers rehabilitation legislation, asbestos-related legislation, from the Motor Accidents Insurance Board or under another law; and
    • admitted and non-admitted private and public patients who are receiving care or treatment in a public hospital and whose injury or disease is one for which the Defence Force of the Australian Government (ADF) accepts responsibility.

    The fees that may be charged are set out in the tables below.

     

    Fees for dental services

    Fees for dental services are detailed in section 8 of the Health (Fees) Regulation Act 2017

    The current fee for holders of valid Health Care Cards or Pensioner Concession Cards is $45.

     

    Nursing-home-type patients

    If you are being provided with accommodation and nursing care in a hospital you may be classed as a nursing-home-type patient. For the full definition please see Section 4 of the Health (Fees) Regulation Act 2017

    From 20 March 2022, the nursing home type patient contribution will increase from $64.05 per day to $65.40 per day.

    The default benefit for nursing home type patients from 20 March 2022 will be $156.95.

    The fees are determined using a formula outlined in Schedule 2 of the Health (Fees) Regulations 2017

    Components

    Schedule 1 - Fees payable by non-nursing-home-type patients

    Unless otherwise stated, all rates are applicable from 1 July 2022 to 30 June 2023.

    Private patients

    Advanced surgical Shared ward (per day) Single room (per day)
    First 14 days $476 $714
    Subsequent days $331 $559

     

    Surgical/obstetric Shared ward (per day) Single room (per day)
    First 14 days $441 $687
    Subsequent days $331 $559

     

    Psychiatric Shared ward (per day) Single room (per day)
    First 42 days $441 $687
    Next 23 days $383 $613
    Subsequent days $331 $559

     

    Rehabilitation Shared ward (per day) Single room (per day)
    First 49 days $441 $687
    Next 16 days $383 $613
    Subsequent days $331 $559

     

    Other patients Shared ward (per day) Single room (per day)
    First 14 days $383 $613
    Subsequent days $331 $559

     

    Same-day patients Rate (per day)
    Band 1: Gastro-intestinal endoscopy, certain minor surgical items and non-surgical procedures that do not normally require an anaesthetic $277
    Band 2: Procedures (other than Band 1) carried out under local anaesthetic, no sedation, if actual time in theatre is less than one hour $330
    Band 3: Procedures (other than Band 1) carried out under general or regional anaesthetic or intravenous sedation, if actual time in theatre is less than one hour $380
    Band 4: Procedures carried out under general or regional anaesthetic or intravenous sedation, if actual time in theatre is one hour or more $441

     

    Admitted compensable patients Rate (per day)
    Rates Apply to all Wards/Services $1055

     

    Where injury or disease responsibility of Commonwealth Defence Forces Rate (per day)
    Rates Apply to all Wards/Services $459

     

    Ineligible non-resident Rate (per day)
    Same day patient $2,282
    Overnight patient $2,688
    Coronary care unit patient $4,848
    Neonatal intensive care unit patient $6,978
    High dependency unit patient $6,978
    Neonatal special care nursery patient $4,003
    Sub-acute care patient $1,583
    Non-acute (maintenance) care patient $1,146

    Category of service Rate (per service)
    Non-admitted compensable patients $107
    Non-admitted patient (ineligible non-resident) $346
    Non-admitted patient (ineligible non-resident attending emergency department) $603
    Where injury or disease responsibility of Commonwealth Defence Forces $107
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    You are a ‘Medicare ineligible patient’ if you are an international student, overseas visitor or temporary visitor or visa holder.

    You cannot receive Medicare benefits if you:

    • do not hold a valid Medicare card
    • are not an asylum seeker or refugee
    • are not a visitor from a country who has a Reciprocal Health Care Agreement with Australia.

    When you come to hospital you will need to provide us with:

    • your passport and information about your visa
    • up-front payment for services
    • any health insurance policy details you have
    • your overseas residential address and phone numbers
    • information on where you are staying and sponsor details during your stay in Australia.

    Where to find more information to help you

    Frequently asked questions

    Will I have to pay for my health care whilst in Tasmania?

    • Yes. You must ensure that you have health insurance cover or enough money to cover the full cost of all hospital services.
    • These costs include: outpatient, inpatient, emergency or allied health (for example physiotherapy) costs
    • theatre (the room where you have surgery), medical imaging (for example, x-rays or MRIs), anaesthetic fees (this is what helps you not feel any pain during an operation or procedure), prosthetics, pathology (for example blood tests) and pharmacy costs (for example prescription medicine)
    • We will send you an invoice for all costs associated with your care and treatment provided.  

    How much do I pay if I have health insurance?

    • You need to pay some money before your treatment. This is called a deposit. It will go towards any costs not covered by your insurance.
    • You must pay for any shortfall between the amount charged and the amount paid by your health fund.
    • Any remaining balance will be refunded to you once payment has been received from the health fund.
    • All outpatient, inpatient and allied health appointments must be paid in full. You can then take the receipts back to your health insurance fund and make a claim. The amount you get back will depend on your health insurance policy.

    How much do I pay if I do not have health insurance?

    • If you are not eligible for Medicare, you will be required to pay for all hospital services including emergency visits and outpatient appointments.
    • You need to pay some money before your treatment. This is called a deposit.
    • If you do not have health insurance, you must pay for the full cost of your health care and treatment.
    • If you do have health insurance, you can take your receipt to your insurance fund to claim a refund.
    • Costs may vary depending on the treatment provided. 

    Description

    Per day

    Description

    Per Occasion of Service

    Same Day

    $2171

    Outpatient Fee

    $329

    Overnight

    $2558

    Emergency Department

    $574

    Intensive Care Unit

    $6639

    Doctor Billing

    To be charged if applicable

    Coronary Care Unit

    $4613

    Anaesthetic Billing

    To be charged if applicable

    High Dependency Unit

    $3,809

    Pathology and Radiology

    To be charged if applicable

    Sub-Acute Patient

    $1,506

    Prosthesis

    To be charged if applicable

    Non-Acute Maintenance Care

    $1,090

    Pharmacy per item

    Must be paid on discharge or per occasion of service

    How do I pay for my treatment?

    By Phone

    Contact Patient Accounts to pay by credit card for all hospital services (see Contact Information below)

    In Person

    Payments can be accepted as cash, cheque, credit card or EFTPOS at:

    Level 1
    Wellington Centre
    42 Argyle Street, Hobart

    Ground Floor
    Mersey Community Hospital
    1 Torquay Road, Latrobe

    Level 3
    Launceston General Hospital
    274-280 Charles Street, Launceston

    4th Floor, Parkside Building
    1 Strahan Street, Burnie 

    or

    Reception at North West Regional Hospital
    23 Brickport Road, Burnie

    How do I find out my level of cover?

    Site

    Telephone

    Email

    Royal Hobart Hospital, Hobart

    +61 03 6166 8251

    [email protected]

    Launceston General Hospital, Launceston

    +61 03 6777 6027

    [email protected]

    Mersey Community Hospital, Latrobe

    +61 03 6478 5258 or

    +61 03 64785 306

    [email protected]

    North West Regional Hospital, Burnie

    +61 03 6477 7787

    [email protected]

    Private health in Australia

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    The Patient Travel Assistance Scheme (PTAS) helps you pay for travel and/or accommodation costs if you:

    • are a Tasmanian permanent resident
    • cannot attend specialist medical services locally.

    This is an assistance scheme only and patients are expected to make a patient contribution.

    Learn more about Patient Travel Assistance Scheme (PTAS) on the travel support page.

    Financial assistance for travelling within Tasmania

    • We can help you pay some costs towards for approved air and road travel, and accommodation
    • You can make your own plans and claim the subsidy back. Subsidy is the portion of money we cover.
    • You can also ask your local PTAS Coordinator to pre-book your travel and/or accommodation.
    • We also cover some of the costs if you need someone to travel with you. This person is called an escort.

    How much we will pay

    • The cost of return economy bus tickets or petrol costs for private vehicle travel to and from the medical facility. The petrol costs that we cover are 21 cents per kilometre.
    • If you live on King Island or the Furneaux Islands, we will cover the cost of a return economy airfare (Island Resident rates). We also pay for the most economical and appropriate form of transport from the destination airport to and from the medical facility.
    • If you need accommodation, we will pay a maximum of $66 per night for each approved person.

    Financial assistance for travelling outside of Tasmania

    • We can help you pay for air/sea and road travel, and some accommodation.
    • Your local PTAS Coordinator will make your bookings.

    How much we will pay

    • If you live more than 75 km from the airport/ ferry terminal, we will help you pay for costs to travel between your home and your departure point.
    • Your air/ferry ticket will be paid at economy class.
    • We also pay for the most economical and appropriate form of transport from the destination airport/ferry terminal to and from the medical facility.
    • If you need accommodation, we will pay a maximum of $66 per night for each approved person.

    How much you will pay for your travel and accommodation

    Travel

    • You will pay $82.50 towards the cost of each return journey.
    • If you have a Health Care or Pensioner Concession card, you will pay $16.50 towards the cost of each return journey.
    • In any one financial year (between 1 July and 30 June), the maximum contribution for a non-cardholder is $330, and for a cardholder is $132.
    • You and anyone approved to travel with you must pay additional costs if you choose a more expensive form of transport than that approved.

    Accommodation

    • You and the person approved to travel with must pay any accommodation costs above the rate that we pay outlined above.
    • If you don’t have a Health Care or Pensioner Concession card, you must pay the first two nights’ accommodation costs for each stay for you and anyone travelling with you.
    Components

    Frequently asked questions

    We may help you pay if:

    • transport to and from the health facility is not possible in the same day
    • your specialist doctor advises you to stay
    • there are limited air services to King Island or Furneaux Islands
    • approval has been granted to extend your stay by one or two days to attend other approved health appointments.

    No.

    • We can help cover the costs of someone to travel with you if you are under the age of 18 years. This person is called an escort.
    • If you are aged 18 years or over, an escort may be eligible for financial assistance if you need them to actively assist you during your travel or treatment.
    • Approval may be given for financial assistance for more than one escort in some exceptional circumstances. Please contact your local PTAS Coordinator to discuss.

    If you think you may have problems, please contact your local PTAS Coordinator to discuss.

    • If you are unable to pay up-front, please contact your local PTAS office to discuss alternative options.
    • Some accommodation providers agree to receive the PTAS accommodation allowance directly from us. This means you only pay the extra amount when you check out.
    • Some accommodation providers offer a special daily or weekly rate especially for patients and their carers. Find out more from your local PTAS office.

    • If you think you may have problems, please contact your local PTAS office to discuss.
    • You will be required to prove that you are in financial difficulty.
    • If your claim for hardship consideration is accepted, you will not be refused to access PTAS.

    No. We encourage you to access the service in Tasmania.

    • Yes. You are entitled to two weeks’ accommodation support prior to the birth of your baby.
    • If you have a complicated pregnancy or need medical support before you give birth, you may be able to get more help.
    • We will help you pay some of your travel cost based on a return economy airfare (Island Resident rates)
    • We will also help you pay for the most economical, appropriate form of transport from the destination airport to and from the medical facility.

    • Yes. The donor and recipient are both eligible for the travel and accommodation subsidy.
    • You can also have someone travel with you. This person is called an escort.
    • We will pay for some of your escort’s accommodation from the night prior to the operation until you are cleared to return home.

    • We will only pay for one journey to a medical appointment.
    • If you are unable to travel on a pre-paid journey, you must tell us and cancel at least 24-hours in advance.
    • If you miss the appointment without good reason or do not provide adequate notice, you are not eligible for a second trip unless there are exceptional circumstances.

    Yes, if:

    • a hospital admission for an elective procedure has been postponed
    • a specialist appointment is cancelled or postponed
    • you are not notified until after commencing the journey.

    In these cases, we will provide the level of financial assistance allowable towards the cost of your travel.

    • If your medical specialist requests a further opinion, you may receive the appropriate travel allowance and, if necessary, an accommodation allowance. This will help you travel to and from the second appointment.
    • If you choose to seek a further medical opinion, you are not eligible for travel assistance.

    • Your doctor will provide you with the PTAS application form and complete Section A.
    • Submit your completed form to your local PTAS Coordinator as soon as possible. This allows time for your application to be assessed before you make your bookings.
    • It is important to note that submitting your application form does not mean you will be approved.

    See instructions for applying

    • If you need to travel urgently, please contact the PTAS Coordinator directly for approval and to organise travel arrangements.
    • On your return, please complete the application form and submit it to the PTAS Coordinator together with your receipts.

    Please lodge your claim to be repaid with all paperwork within four months of returning from your treatment.

    We pay you by bank transfer. You can provide your details on your application form.

    You should expect to receive your money within four weeks of lodging your receipts.

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    Publications and resources for patients

    This brochure outlines ways to keep yourself safe when staying in hospital, including:

    • Your rights
    • Preventing falls
    • Preventing infection
    • Your medicines
    • Pressure injuries
    • ID
    • Blood transfusions
    • Preventing blood clots
    • Be involved in your care
    • Leaving hospital

    We aim to provide documents in an accessible format. If you are having problems using a document with your accessibility tools, please contact us for help.

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    We aim to provide documents in an accessible format. If you are having problems using a document with your accessibility tools, please contact us for help.

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    Use this application form for the Patient Travel Assistance Scheme (PTAS).

    Learn about PTAS

    We aim to provide documents in an accessible format. If you are having problems using a document with your accessibility tools, please contact us for help.

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    Coronavirus Tasmania website

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    Keep it Covid Safe text in logo
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    What's the latest

    The Secretary, Department of Health will lead a Child Safe Governance Review to examine the governance of the Launceston General Hospital and Human Resources, in particular with a focus upon the handling of serious misconduct such as institutional child sexual abuse.

    For further information, please refer to the Terms of Reference

    Through the Child Safe Organisation Project, we are implementing key improvements across the Department to build a child safe culture that ensures the rights, safety, and wellbeing of every child and young person accessing our services.

    The project is building on existing patient quality and safety approaches to implement the National Principles for Child Safe Organisations and associated child safe standards to give us the tools to safeguard the health and wellbeing of all children.

    In an important first milestone for the project, we are today releasing a new Department of Health Child Safety and Wellbeing Framework for consultation and stakeholder feedback.

    The framework outlines the proposed approach to safeguarding children and young people accessing our services and facilities, including expressly stating rights of children and young people, a safeguarding definition for the Department of Health, governance arrangements, education and training approaches, and best practice procedures for responding to safeguarding concerns.

    The framework is also supported by guidelines on recognising the signs of harm to children and young people and disclosures of harm.

    We are already making strong progress in implementing immediate changes to ensure the safety of children and young people across health services.

    To support our staff to recognise and respond to child safety concerns, we are introducing mandatory child safety training for all Department of Health staff and volunteers, and this month we are piloting the child safeguarding training program with priority areas of the workforce that work with children and young people.

    Importantly, we have also launched a new “Reporting Concerns of Inappropriate Behaviour Form” for the public and staff to report any behaviour that has occurred in our hospitals and health workplaces and is inappropriate or causes concern. This provides all members of the public and staff with a clear and standardised route to report any concerns to the Department, in addition to existing avenues for reporting.

    Nothing is more important to our hospitals and health services than the safety and wellbeing of children, young people and vulnerable people that come into our care.

    Every one of us has a personal responsibility to uphold the rights of children and young people to safely receive health care.

    We welcome feedback on the Child Safety and Wellbeing Framework from key stakeholders, with comments to [email protected] until 24 July 2022.

    For further information and to download the documents, please visit: https://www.health.tas.gov.au/publications/child-safety-and-wellbeing-consultation-documents


    Contact:  Oliver Ellis

    Phone:  0447 992 509

    What the Department is doing

    The Child Safe Governance Review, announced by the State Government on 3 July 2022 is commencing immediately. 

    While the State Government looks forward to the recommendations from the Commission of Inquiry next year, it is clear that action is needed now.

    The Child Safe Governance Review is about making important and necessary changes which will focus on resetting the organisational structure of the LGH and Human Resources, with a priority focus on the handling of serious misconduct such as institutional child sexual abuse.  This is about safeguarding children.

    An important step has now been taken in the Child Safe Governance Review with the announcement of the appointment of the two Independent Co-Chairs of the Governance Advisory Panel which will conduct the Review. 

    Read the announcement from the Premier and the Secretary

    The Governance Advisory Panel will include other independent experts with qualifications in governance, child safety, hospital administration and human resources management.  Union Representatives have also been invited to participate.

    It is also vitally important that victim-survivors are provided with an opportunity to participate in the Review.  Victim-survivors will be invited to participate in an expert reference group for the Governance Advisory Panel.

    Department of Health staff are also encouraged to participate in the Review.

    Expression of interest

    Applications for the Governance Advisory Panel closed on Friday, 22 July 2022.

    Applicants will be advised of the outcome shortly.

     

    View or download the Terms of Reference for the Governance Advisory Panel 

     

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    Our Healthcare Future will build a sustainable health system in Tasmania. 

    It will connect and rebalance care across acute, subacute, rehabilitation, mental health and primary health to care in the community.

    This is stage two of the Tasmanian Government’s long-term reform to consult, design and build an integrated and sustainable health service.

    We require ongoing collaboration with health consumers, healthcare professionals and stakeholders for these reforms to be successful.  This year there will be opportunity to participate in clinical services and long-term planning.

    For further information about the reform and consultation process, email: [email protected].

    Advancing Tasmania's health

    Our Healthcare Future: Advancing Tasmanian’s Health provides a united vision that all Tasmanians are supported by a world-class, innovative and integrated health system.  

    It provides a policy direction for healthcare in Tasmania over the next 20 years.

    Our Healthcare Future: Advancing Tasmanian’s Health provides six principles to support how the vision will be achieved and guide decision making.

    The Tasmanian health system will be:

    • consumer centred
    • collaborative
    • innovative
    • integrated
    • equitable
    • evidence based

    Based on these principles, six strategic ambitions have been developed for the future health reforms:

    • Better and More Accessible Community Care
    • Strengthening Prevention
    • Partnering with Consumers and Clinicians
    • Building the Health Workforce
    • Delivering the Health Infrastructure of the Future
    • Strengthening Tasmania’s Pandemic Response

    The exposure draft of Our Healthcare Future: Advancing Tasmania’s Health was guided by an Expert Advisory Group.

    The Group represented health consumers, clinicians, academics, primary health and social services to work with senior members of the Department. It concluded in December 2021 and supported:

    • A Literature Review on strengthening healthcare to deliver the right care, in the right place, at the right time. This is being done by the University of Tasmania.
    • A data analysis exercise to model projected demand for healthcare in Tasmania based on population need. The findings of this exercise are presented in the companion document Drivers of Tasmania’s Future Population Health Needs.

    The Department thanks the Expert Advisory Group for their time and expertise guiding this work. 

    For information on how Our Healthcare Future: Advancing Tasmania’s Health will inform future health planning, please refer to the summary of the Strategic Planning Environment.

    Progress Summary Reports

    Progress summary reports are published quarterly.  They provide progress towards the Immediate Actions for the long-term plan for healthcare in Tasmania.

    To find out more about the Immediate Actions see below.

    Immediate actions

    The Department is implementing immediate actions as part of the development and implementation of the long-term plan for healthcare in Tasmania.

    Reform Initiative 1: Increase and better target our investment to the right care, place and time to maximise benefits to patients.

    • Finalise implementation and evaluate the Southern Hospital in the Home Trial.
    • Consult stakeholders on the Urgent Care Centre (UCC) Feasibility Study findings and finalise future delivery models.
    • Develop and implement a service that provides GPs and other primary care health professionals with rapid access to staff specialists in the North and North West to provide care to people with chronic and complex healthcare needs, particularly during early acute exacerbations of chronic conditions.
    • Building on Tasmania's response to COVID-19 which included significant focus on telehealth develop and implement a Telehealth Strategy for Tasmania that provides high quality patient care and integrates service delivery across acute, subacute, primary and community care.

    Reform Initiative 2: Invest in modern ICT infrastructure to digitally transform our hospitals, improve patient information outcomes and better manage our workforce.

    • Procure and implement a new Human Resources Information System (HRIS) to replace payroll, rostering, workplace health and safety, conduct and leave management.
    • Develop a Health ICT Plan 2020 - 2030 encompassing electronic medical records, a new patient information system, electronic tools for managing care for patients in appropriate settings, and the new Human Resource Information System.
    • Partner with Primary Health Tasmania to improve patient care by enhancing the interface between specialist and primary healthcare through: 
      • implementation of a single eReferral system between primary care and the Tasmanian Health Service
      • scoping the requirements to implement a secure web-based application to enable GPs to view key information about patients in the care held by the Tasmanian Health Service
      • a continued partnership-based focus on the development and implementation of jointly agreed clinician led Tasmanian health pathways.

    Reform Initiative 3a: Develop a long-term health infrastructure strategy for Tasmania.

    Reform Initiative 3b: Build a strong health professional workforce, aligned to a highly integrated health service, to meet the needs of Tasmanians.

    • Release Health Workforce 2040 for consultation.
    • Provide an opportunity for health professionals, health services, educational institutions and future health professionals to review and provide further input into the draft Health Workforce 2040 strategy. This will inform the final Focus Areas and Actions in the strategy.
    • Partner with the University of Tasmania to better help support the recruitment of targeted specialists in regional areas through conjoint appointments, with a focus on the North West.
    • Engage with the University of Tasmania to explore the alignment of future course offerings to future identified gaps in the workforce.

    Reform Initiative 3c: Strengthen the clinical and consumer voice in health service planning.

    • Establish a Statewide Clinical Senate to provide expert advice to the Secretary, Department of Health and Ministers on health service planning. The purpose, role and function of the Clinical Senate will be co-designed with key stakeholders.
    • Establish a Future Health Leaders Forum to support and develop emerging health leaders.

    Our Healthcare Future – Next Steps

    Following the release of the exposure draft of Our Healthcare Future: Advancing Tasmania’s Health, the next steps in the Our Healthcare Future reform process are the development of:

    • Regional clinical service plans.  These plans will encompass primary, acute, sub-acute and community health services.
    • An integrated long-term plan for healthcare in Tasmania which incorporates clinical service planning at a statewide level, to be released by December 2022.

    The long-term plan will focus on achieving a more sustainable health system with better outcomes for consumers, their families and carers now and in the future.  It will also build on and bring together the significant pieces of work already done.

    KP Health is working with the Department to develop these plans.

    A Health Planning Oversight Committee, reporting to the Secretary DoH, will oversee the development of the plans through to December 2022

    The Health Planning Oversight Committee is supported by three regional reference groups and a consumer reference group. Other key stakeholders or reference groups will contribute to different phases of the planning, as needed.

    Progress against key planning activities will be monitored to make sure they align with commitments and major service development, infrastructure and masterplanning projects. 

    To keep up to date, refer to the Progress Summary Reports

    Stage 2 - Our Healthcare Future

    Our Healthcare Future will build a sustainable health system in Tasmania. 

    It will connect and rebalance care across acute, subacute, rehabilitation, mental health and primary health to care in the community.

    We know that healthcare demand is increasing in Tasmania due to:

    • Social and demographic features including ageing population and high number of people living with co-morbid health conditions.
    • People being cared for in hospital instead of through subacute, primary, community and home-based services.
    • Care in the wrong place isn’t best for people and comes at a high cost.

    Around $100 million is spent each year on care delivered in hospital that could have been delivered at a lower cost in the community.

    Stage Two reforms will focus on the delivery of better care in the community, as part of a balanced and sustainable health system – right care, in the right place, at the right time.

    Consultation paper and emerging themes

    The release of the Our Healthcare Future Immediate Actions and Consultation Paper in late 2020 marked the start of the Stage Two reforms. The Consultation Paper highlighted key issues impacting healthcare in Tasmania now and in the future, and proposed three key improvement areas:

    1. Better Community Care
    2. Modernising Tasmania’s Health System
    3. Planning for the Future

    The Department would like to thank all the organisations and individuals who prepared submissions in response to the Immediate Actions and Consultation Paper.

    Analysis of submissions – Emerging Themes

    Submissions were received from a broad cross section of the community, including consumers, clinicians, professional groups, service providers, advocacy groups, policy experts and academics.

    The Department’s completed analysis outlines the Emerging Themes (Summary Version) from the submissions, finding:

    • wide support for the overarching proposed themes
    • strong support for patients to be treated in the community where possible, and for greater emphasis on preventative health
    • an acknowledged need for digital transformation, long-term infrastructure and workforce planning to improve access to services and support new models of care.

    The submissions noted the importance of health professionals and consumers being involved in health planning and supported the creation of a statewide Clinical Senate and other consumer and clinical engagement strategies to assist in providing this advice.

    Further themes to emerge against each key improvement area are set out in detail in the Emerging Themes (Full Version) report. The report also maps the key themes from the submissions against improvement activities that the Tasmanian Government has planned or underway, to identify opportunities for further reform under Our Healthcare Future.

    Submissions received in response to the Consultation

    The submissions below were received in response to the Our Healthcare Future Immediate Actions and Consultation Paper and have been published in accordance with the Tasmanian Government’s Public Submissions Policy.

    In line with the Tasmanian Government Guidelines Publication of submissions received by Tasmanian Government Departments in response to consultation on major policy matters, some submissions were appropriately withheld from publication or information was wholly or partly redacted. For example, private phone numbers or information that is confidential or identifies third parties.

    Opinions expressed in the submissions are those of the authors and do not reflect the views of the Tasmanian Government or the Department of Health.

    If you believe your submission has been inappropriately withheld from publication or redacted, please feel free to contact the Department of Health to discuss this.

    ID

    Date Received

    Organisation

    OHF.1.1

    12/02/2021

    Alcohol and Drug Foundation

    OHF.1.2

    12/02/2021

    Alcohol, Tobacco and Other Drugs Council of Tasmania

    OHF.1.3

    21/01/2021

    Asthma Australia

    OHF.1.4

    12/02/2021

    Australasian College for Emergency Medicine

    OHF.1.5

    27/02/2021

    Australian Dental Association (Tasmanian Branch)

    OHF.1.6

    18/01/2021

    Australian Healthcare and Hospitals Association

    OHF.1.7

    19/02/2021

    Australian Medical Association Tasmania

    OHF.1.8

    12/02/2021

    Australian Nursing and Midwifery Federation

    OHF.1.9

    17/02/2021

    Australian Physiotherapy Association

    OHF.1.10

    11/02/2021

    Breastfeeding Coalition Tasmania

    OHF.1.11

    09/02/2021

    Cancer Council Tasmania

    OHF.1.12

    12/02/2021

    Cancer Services, RHH

    OHF.1.13

    09/02/2021

    Central Connect's Connecting Care Chronic Health Action Group

    OHF.1.14

    01/03/2021

    City Mission

    OHF.1.15

    10/02/2021

    Clinical Governance Unit; and Quality Patient and Safety Service Unit, DoH

    OHF.1.16

    12/02/2021

    Community Allied Health, THS North

    OHF.1.17

    12/02/2021

    Consumer and Community Engagement Council, THS North

    OHF.1.18

    04/02/2020

    Consumer and Community Engagement Council, THS South

    OHF.1.19

    15/02/2021

    Council on the Ageing Tasmania

    OHF.1.20

    02/02/2021

    Department of Education

    OHF.1.21

    12/02/2021

    Diabetes Centre, THS North West

    OHF.1.22

    12/02/2021

    Diabetes Tasmania

    OHF.1.23

    12/02/2021

    Drug Education Network

    OHF.1.24

    17/02/2021

    Exercise & Sports Science Australia (ESSA)

    OHF.1.25

    12/02/2021

    Family Planning Tasmania

    OHF.1.26

    10/02/2021

    Friends of the Northern Hospice

    OHF.1.27

    15/02/2021

    General Practice & Primary Care Unit, DoH

    OHF.1.28

    19/02/2021

    Haemophilia Foundation Tasmania

    OHF.1.29

    18/12/2020

    Health Consumers Tasmania

    OHF.1.30

    12/02/2021

    Health Promotion Consultants/Coordinators, THS North West, South and North

    OHF.1.31

    23/02/2021

    Heart Foundation

    OHF.1.32

    10/12/2020

    Massage and Myopathy Australia

    OHF.1.33

    12/02/2021

    Mental Health Council of Tasmania

    OHF.1.34

    04/02/2021

    Mental Health Families and Friends Tasmania

    OHF.1.35

    10/02/2021

    Mersey Community Hospital Support Group

    OHF.1.36

    19/02/2021

    Occupational Therapy Australia

    OHF.1.37

    12/02/2021

    Occupational Therapy Discipline Leads, THS North, THS South, THS North West

    OHF.1.38

    25/02/2021

    Office of the National Rural Health Commissioner

    OHF.1.39

    19/02/2021

    Palliative Care Tasmania

    OHF.1.40

    12/02/2021

    Pharmaceutical Society of Australia

    OHF.1.41

    10/02/2021

    Primary Health North, THS North

    OHF.1.42

    22/02/2021

    Primary Health Tasmania

    OHF.1.43

    11/02/2021

    Public Health Association Australia

    OHF.1.44

    19/02/2021

    Public Health Services, DoH

    OHF.1.45

    17/12/2020

    Royal Australian College of General Practitioners

    OHF.1.46

    15/02/2021

    Royal Flying Doctor Service (Tas Branch)

    OHF.1.47

    11/02/2021

    Rural Doctors Association Tasmania

    OHF.1.48

    12/02/2021

    Stroke Foundation

    OHF.1.49

    12/01/2021

    Tasmania Fire Service

    OHF.1.50

    26/02/2021

    Tasmanian Council of Social Service Inc

    OHF.1.51

    18/02/2021

    Tasmanian Labor Party

    OHF.1.52

    12/02/2021

    The Pharmacy Guild of Australia, Tasmanian Branch

    OHF.1.53

    16/02/2021

    University of Tasmania

    OHF.1.54

    12/02/2021

    Volunteering Tasmania

    OHF.1.55

    13/01/2021

    West Coast Council

    OHF.1.56

    12/02/2021

    Women's Health Tasmania

    ID

    Date Received

    Individual(s)

    OHF.2.1

    19/02/2021

    Andrew Wilkie MP

    OHF.2.2

    19/02/2021

    Bianca St John, Staff Specialist – Endocrinology NWRH

    OHF.2.3

    01/02/2021

    Christine Smith

    OHF.2.4

    09/12/2020

    Diana Taylor

    OHF.2.5

    28/01/2021

    Fran Thompson

    OHF.2.6

    24/12/2020

    Geoff Couser, Staff Specialist – ED, RHH

    OHF.2.7

    19/01/2021

    Jan Randall

    OHF.2.8

    12/02/2021

    Lia Giovanovits, PhysioTas

    OHF.2.9

    12/02/2021

    Luke Rayner, Head of Department, General Surgery, THS

    OHF.2.10

    12/02/2021

    Mohammed Huque

    OHF.2.11

    11/02/2021

    Neroli Newlyn, Diabetes Nurse Practitioner; and Colin Banks, Assistant Director of Nursing; THS South

    OHF.2.12

    18/01/2021

    Pamela Lynam, Registered Nurse, LGH

    OHF.2.13

    25/02/2021

    Private

    OHF.2.14

    02/02/2021

    Robyn Wallace

    OHF.2.15

    12/02/2021

    Sally McLaine, PhysioTas

    OHF.2.16

    09/12/2020

    Trixie Kemp, Manager – Health Information Service – THS

    Stage 1 - One State, One Health System, Better Outcomes

    In 2015 stage 1 of the health reforms begun.  One State, One Health System, Better Outcomes was the  first step of designing and implementing a single, statewide service. The focus was on the four major hospitals and defining their roles within the health system:

    • Over $1 billion dollars has been committed to health system infrastructure, and over $550 million to additional staffing and operational costs across our health system.
    • The reforms were developed through  wide community consultation process.
    • In 2019, the Royal Hobart Hospital (RHH) Access Solutions Action Plan and the Patient’s First Hospital Actions looked at  issues impacting access and patient flow within the major hospitals.
    • Stage One reforms continue to complement Our Healthcare Future (stage 2  reforms).

    One State, One Health System, Better Outcomes has also been complemented by the Patient’s First and RHH Access Solutions initiatives which have focused on increasing access to hospital services.

    The following documents and consultation papers are available:

    One State, One Health System, Better Outcomes

    RHH Access Solutions

    Last updated

    If you feel unsafe or if you are unhappy with how you have been treated by us please let us know. It is always ok to speak up if you are not happy.

    You should speak up...

    • If you don't feel safe.
    • If you're being hurt.
    • If you're unhappy with the way you're being treated.

     

    If you feel unsafe or at risk and need help urgently, call the Police on 000.

    Reporting concerns of inappropriate behaviour

    Use this form to report concerns of inappropriate behaviour by a staff member, volunteer, visitor, patient or other person within Tasmania’s health care services or premises.

    Health topics

    Learn about mental health

    Statewide Mental Health Services delivers care to Tasmanians with mental health conditions.

    • We provide services in inpatient settings, like a hospital, and in the community.
    • We partner with community sector organisations to deliver support services to people with mental illness.
    • Services can also be provided by private specialists and facilities.
    • For many people, their doctor (GP) will be their first point of contact.

    There are a number of private health providers in Tasmania. These include hospital inpatient settings and outpatient clinics, private psychologists, psychiatrists and other mental health professionals.

    Services include

    In an emergency, please call 000.

    For support making a referral, contact Access Mental Health - Helpline 1800 332 388

    We offer a free, confidential service for adults 18-65 with severe and complex mental health problems. This includes assessment, treatment, support and education.

    Who will support you?

    Your assessment and treatment are provided by professional clinical teams and support staff. They may include:

    • mental health nurses
    • clinical psychologists
    • peer workers (consumers and carers)
    • social workers
    • occupational therapists
    • psychiatrists
    • other specialist medical staff.

    Services we provide

    Our Adult Mental Health Services team provides a range of services for people with complex mental health illness including:

    • advice and information about services to assist with mental illness
    • assessment, treatment and rehabilitation for people with serious mental illness
    • extended treatment, support and care for persistent or recurring mental illness.

    We also work with other providers, doctors (GPs), private health care providers and emergency services.

    Services locations

    Community team

    Service areas

    Hobart and Southern Districts

    Hobart, Kingsborough and Huon Valley

    Glenorchy and Northern Districts

    Glenorchy, Derwent Valley and Central Highlands

    Clarence and Eastern Districts

    Eastern Shore and East Coast

    Launceston and Northern Region

    Northern Tasmania (63 and 67 phone areas)

    North West Region

    North West Tasmania (64 and 65 phone areas)

    How to provide feedback

    We welcome your feedback.

    View how to provide feedback to Mental Health Services

    Other helpful services

    Service

    Phone

    Access Mental Health - Helpline

    1800 332 388

    Advocacy Tasmania Inc.

    1800 005 131

    Alcohol and Drug Service Tasmania

    1300 139 641

    Alcohol Drug Information Service [ADIS] (24 hr)

    1800 250 015

    Child Safety Service - Communities Tasmania (24 hr)

    1800 000 123

    Parent Line - Child Health & Parenting Services (24 hr)

    1300 808 178

    Family Violence Counselling and Support

    1800 608 122

    Lifeline (crisis counselling 24 hr)

    13 11 14

    Mental Health Families & Friends Tasmania

    03 6228 7448

    Official Visitors Program

    1800 001 170

    Q Life (LGBTI support)

    1800 184 527

    Relationships Australia (Tasmania)

    1300 364 277

    Sexual Assault Support Service (24 hr)

    1800 697 877

    Suicide Call Back Service (24 hr)

    1300 659 467

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    In an emergency, please call 000.

    For support making a referral to Child and Adolescent Mental Health Services, contact the Access Mental Health - Helpline 1800 332 388

    Child and Adolescent Mental Health Services (CAMHS) support Tasmanian infants, children and young people up to 18 years. Our services also include:

    • Perinatal and Infant Mental Health Service (for women and their families in southern Tasmania)
    • community family therapy.

    Download our Child and Adolescent Mental Health Services fact sheet

    What we do

    We work closely with families to provide support and specialist treatment. This includes assessment, education and treatment services for mental difficulties such as:

    • anxiety disorders
    • attachment disorders
    • autism spectrum disorders (assessment and/or mental health-related symptoms)
    • eating disorders
    • major depression and mood disorders
    • mental health concerns in pregnancy and following birth
    • psychosis
    • severe emotional trauma and adjustment problems
    • suicide risk and self-harm.

    We also provide community family therapy if your child is receiving support from us. 

    How to access our service

    Who will support you?

    We have a diverse team of health professionals experienced in working with young people. Our team work together and consult with each other on a regular basis. You will be supported by:

    • administrative support staff
    • child and perinatal psychiatrists
    • clinical nurse specialists
    • clinical psychologists
    • occupational therapists
    • psychiatric registrars
    • social workers
    • speech pathologist (available in the South only).

    How we help you

    Before we undertake any treatment and support, we consider:

    • your child and your family situation
    • how the treatment may impact their future
    • what other services may help or need to be involved.

    Referral process

    • If your referral is accepted, we allocate your case to a professional clinician.
    • Sometimes you might have to go on a waiting list.
    • If we have yours and your child’s permission, we will request information and reports from other services. For example, your child’s school or GP.

    Treatment process

    • At your first appointment we spend time talking with your child (and in some situations with you) about why they are here.
    • We also ask about school, medical concerns, who is in their family and how everyone gets on.
    • We also like to find out about what they like, skills and strengths.
    • Once we have a good idea of what the problem is, we will work on a care plan.
    • This is called an Individual Service Plan and includes your child’s goals and how to meet them.

    Individual service plans

    Individual service plans (ISPs) are agreements between your/your child and their clinician (case manager) about the diagnosis, treatment and its focus (and your goals). An ISP includes:

    • the major problems
    • treatment goals – how do you and your family want things to be?
    • strategies to achieve goals – what are we going to do to help?
    • people involved and their responsibilities
    • timeframes – how long will we try this for?

    We will regularly review the ISP so that we know we are on the right track.

    Assessments and treatments offered

    The following types of treatments may be offered under an ISP.

    Treatment

    Overview

    Community treatment

    Most treatment occurs in the community.

    It may also involve liaison with your child’s school and other significant people in their life.

    There are several types of treatment that may be recommended by your clinician.

    The decision to choose a particular treatment is usually determined by the type of mental health problem the child or adolescent is experiencing.

    Your clinician will offer treatment(s) known to be the most helpful with this type of problem and will discuss the reasons why these treatments have been chosen. A combination of therapies is often the most appropriate in addressing mental health problems efficiently.

    Treatments other than those outlined here are available.

    If one is recommended by your Clinician, ask for more information.

    Crisis intervention

    Crisis Intervention is a quick response to a serious, perhaps life-threatening, situation.

    This involves a brief assessment and planning so that a further crisis can be avoided.

    Assessment of specific aspects

    Assessment of specific difficulties may be recommended if we need more information to determine the most appropriate treatment plan.

    This may include assessment of sensory/sensory-motor development, and cognitive/thinking or problem-solving abilities.

    Medication

    Medication can be of value in the treatment of certain disorders.

    When medication is recommended it is usually in conjunction with other forms of therapy.

    Family therapy

    We invite close family members to be involved in finding solutions to current problems.

    Group therapy

    Group therapy enables patients to help each other through their interaction and an opportunity to belong under the guidance of experienced staff.

    Parental therapy

    We offer support to parents who have become stuck in negative cycles over their child’s problems on how to parent these children more effectively.

    Individual psychotherapy

    Psychotherapy is where we develop a therapeutic relationship with the patient to promote changes in their mental state and understanding of the world.

    Supportive therapy

    Supportive therapy involves assisting you to develop coping strategies in order to deal with your current situations.

    This may involve seeking out support groups in the community.

    Cognitive Behaviour Therapy

    Cognitive behaviour therapy is a technique used to assist you to overcome problems by thinking about them in a different way.

    Psychoeducation

    This provides information to the client or family about their mental health and answers questions that they may have about their condition.

    Your rights and personal information

    We welcome your feedback.

    View how to provide feedback to Mental Health Services

    Our facilities

    South

    Location

    Opening hours

    Clare House

    26 Clare Street

    New Town

    Monday to Friday

    8:45am - 5:00pm

     

    North

    Location

    Opening hours

    46 Cameron Street

    Launceston

    Monday to Friday

    8:30am – 4:30pm

     

    North West

    Location

    Opening hours

    5th Floor, Reece House

    46 Mount Street

    Burnie

    Monday to Friday

    8.30am - 5.00pm

    Community sector services and resources

    Helpful services

    Service

    Overview

    Contact details

    Taz Kidz Club

    Anglicare Tasmania

    Taz Kidz Clubs provides support to children aged between 7-17 whose parents have a mental illness. The Clubs run after school for eight weeks during the school semester. They provide support and education about mental illness through a variety of creative and artistic projects.

    Phone: 03 6213 3555

    Champs Camps

    Anglicare Tasmania

     

    Champs Camps provide support to children aged between 7-17 whose parents have a mental illness. Camps are held over two nights, five times a year to give young people and opportunity to get away and have fun. 

    Phone: 03 6213 3555

    Parenting Support Programs

    Anglicare Tasmania

    This are early intervention programs designed to support families with parental mental illness. 

    Phone: 03 6213 3555

     

    Helpful resources

    Please visit the following websites for helpful information and support.

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    In an emergency, please call 000.

    For support making a referral to Older Persons Mental Health Services, contact Access Mental Health - Helpline 1800 332 388

    • We offer a free, confidential service for older adults with severe and complex mental health problems.
    • Our Older Persons Mental Health Service (OPMHS) deliver these services.
    • Treatment is provided through community services in support with your family and carers.
    • For dementia services, please visit the Dementia Behaviour Management Advisory Service website or call them on 1800 699 799.

    Download our Older Persons Mental Health Services brochure

    How to access our service

    • Contact Access Mental Health - Helpline on 1800 332 388.
    • This is a free call, confidential phone service available 24 hours, 7 days a week.
    • Referrals can also be made to OPMHS by your doctor or other psychiatric specialists by contacting the MHS Helpline.

    Who will support you?

    • Nurses.
    • Allied health professionals (for example psychologists, physiotherapists).
    • Medical officers.
    • Psychiatrists.
    • Support staff.

    Services we provide

    Our services are:

    • community teams across Tasmania
    • inpatient service for assessment and treatment
    • day centre program in southern Tasmania
    • case management.

    Case management

    • information, support and counselling for individuals and families
    • assessment of mental health problems
    • treatment advice and support in both community and inpatient settings
    • home visits
    • liaison and referrals with other healthcare professionals and service providers
    • community education and health promotion.

    Inpatient and day centre services

    The Roy Fagan Centre is our specialised hospital for older Tasmanians with psychiatric illness or cognitive impairment. The centre is located in Hobart and comprises:

    About the Roy Fagan Centre

    • We aim to provide a safe and secure environment at the Centre.
    • During your stay, your assessment, treatment and care is provided 24 hours a day by qualified staff.
    • If you have an advanced care plan, please let our team know upon your admission.

    For further information, please call 03 6166 6370 or download the brochure.

    About advance care planning

    Where our community services are located

    Location

    Phone

    North

    03 6777 4985

    North West

    03 6477 7737

    South

    03 6166 6783

    How to provide feedback

    We welcome your feedback.

    View how to provide feedback to Mental Health Services

    Other helpful services

    Service

    Phone

    Access Mental Health - Helpline

    1800 332 388

    Advocacy Tasmania Inc.

    1800 005 131

    Alcohol Drug Information Service [ADIS]

    1800 250 015

    Dementia Behaviour Management Advisory Service

    1800 699 799

    Family Violence Counselling and Support

    1800 608 122

    Guardianship and Administration Board

    1300 799 625

    Lifeline (crisis counselling 24 hr)

    13 11 14

    Mental Health Families & Friends Tasmania

    03 6228 7448

    My Aged Care (including carer respite)

    1800 200 422

    National Dementia Helpline

    1800 100 500

    Official Visitors Program

    1800 001 170

    Relationships Australia (Tasmania)

    1300 364 277

     

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    If you or someone you know is experiencing distress, seek help and support from Lifeline 13 11 14 or the Suicide Call Back Service 1300 659 467.

    In an emergency, call Triple Zero 000

     

    Access Mental Health is a mental health support, triage, and referral phone line delivered by the Department of Health, Tasmania in partnership with Lifeline Tasmania.

    It operates from 9am to 10pm every day to support the Tasmanian community and make it easier to access to the Tasmanian mental health system.

    Anyone in Tasmania can call Access Mental Health on 1800 332 388 for:

    • immediate counselling support over the phone
    • information about the Tasmanian mental health system
    • help making a referral to public mental health services.

    If you are a current consumer, you can call Access Mental Health to get in touch with your community team. GPs and other treating health professionals can also call Access Mental Health to make referrals.

    Access Mental Health is operated by skilled and experienced mental health professionals. Wherever you are in Tasmania, you will speak with someone who understands the Tasmanian mental health system and the mental health services available near you.

    Download the Access Mental Health Helpline brochure

    Access Mental Health supersedes the longstanding Mental Health Services Helpline and is now the single referral point for public mental health services. It uses the same phone number, 1800 332 388, and provides the same services.

    Referral Form

    Download the Access Mental Health Referral Form

    Other crisis support services

    Service

    Focus

    Availability

    Contact

    Lifeline

    National phone crisis counselling service and online counselling for people experiencing emotional distress

    24/7

    13 11 14

    Lifeline

    StandBy Support Service 

    Tasmanian phone suicide postvention counselling service

    24/7

    1300 727 247

    StandBy Support Service

    Suicide Call Back Service 

    National phone counselling service for people at risk of suicide, concerned about someone at risk, bereaved by suicide, or experiencing emotional or mental health issues

    24/7

    1300 659 467

    Suicide Call Back Service 

    MensLine Australia

    National phone support and online counselling for men

    24/7

    1300 789 978

    MensLine Australia

    13YARN 

    National phone support for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people

    24/7

    13 92 76

    13YARN

    QLife

    National phone and webchat, LGBTI peer support for people wanting to talk about a range of issues including sexuality, identity, gender, bodies, feelings, or relationships

    3 pm to 12 am, seven days a week

    1800 184 527

    QLife

    Open Arms – Veterans and Families Counselling

    National face-to-face, telephone, and online counselling service for people that have served in the Australian Defence Force and their families 

    24/7

    1800 011 046

    Open Arms – Veterans and Families Counselling

    Kids Helpline

    Phone support and online counselling for young people aged 5 to 25

    24/7

    1800 55 1800

    Kids Helpline

    Beyond Blue

    Phone support and online chat service and links to local services

    24/7

    1300 22 4636

    Beyond Blue

    headspace

    National online counselling service for young people

    24/7

    headspace

    Mental Health Families and Friends Tasmania

    Tasmanian phone support for families and friends supporting someone with their mental ill health, including someone impacted by suicide

    9 am to 5 pm, weekdays

    03 6228 7448

    Mental Health Families and Friends Tasmania

    How to provide feedback

    We welcome your feedback.

    View how to provide feedback to Mental Health Services

     

    Introduction
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    Our inpatient mental health services for Tasmanian adults up to age 65 are located at:

    Extended treatment services and residential rehabilitation for patients from across Tasmania are located at:

    How to access these services

    How much does it cost?

    All services are free.

    The Safewards program

    • We use the Safewards program in our specialist inpatient facilities.
    • It encourages patients and staff to work together to make inpatient units safer for everyone.
    • Safewards uses 10 simple things that decrease conflict in the inpatient environment.
    • Safer means a calmer and more positive place.
    • Download the Safewards fact sheet or visit the Safewards website
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    We work in partnership with the community sector to deliver support services to Tasmanians with moderate to severe mental health conditions.

    Residential rehabilitation services

    • Residential rehabilitation programs provide a safe and secure community living environment for residents with a major mental health diagnosis.
    • They provide opportunities for people to regain social, recreational and personal life skills and to work towards independent living.
    • These community-focused services help create pathways for residents into the wider community. 
    • To be eligible, you must be a Statewide Mental Health Services client aged 18 years or over and be diagnosed with an enduring mental illness and be committed to develop skills for independent living. 
    • Providers include Richmond Fellowship of Tasmania and Anglicare

    How to apply for a program

    Contact Access Mental Health - Helpline to discuss eligibility.

    Community-based recovery and rehabilitation programs

    We fund organisations to deliver recovery and rehabilitation programs around Tasmania for people:

    • aged 18 years or over
    • recovering from a diagnosed mental illness
    • able to live independently in the community
    • actively committed to working on a rehabilitation program.

    Providers include

    • Anglicare Tasmania
    • Baptcare
    • Family Based Care Association North West
    • Life Without Barriers
    • Richmond Fellowship Tasmania

    Consumer support groups

    Group

    Details

    Contact

    Eureka Clubhouse (Colony 47)

    A community-based rehabilitation centre in Moonah run by and for people with mental health problems. Activities may lead to supported employment opportunities like administration, food services, gardening and maintenance.

    Phone: 03 6278 9179

    Visit the Eureka Clubhouse website

    GROW Groups

    GROW operates support groups for people with a mental illness across Tasmania. They are recovery-focussed, community-building educational programs based upon a spirit of genuine love, care and understanding. 

    Phone: 03 6223 6284

    Email: [email protected]

    Visit the GROW Groups website  

    Australian Huntington’s Disease Association Tasmania

    Drop-in centre providing support and advocacy. 

    Phone: 03 6431 3403

    Email: [email protected]

    Visit the Australian Huntington’s Disease Association Tasmania website

    MATES Program

    (Australian Red Cross Society)

    A befriending program that recruits, trains and supports volunteers to offer ongoing friendship to a person with a diagnosed mental illness.

    • You must have a diagnosed mental illness and be over 18.

    • You must work with a mental health care professional on a regular basis

    • You must be isolated and lonely due to mental health issues

    Your mental healthcare professional can refer you to this program or you can refer yourself.

    Email: [email protected]

    South
    Phone: 03 6235 6025
     

    North
    Phone: 03 6331 2522
     

    North West
    Phone: 03 6431 1848

    Migrant Resource Centre

    These groups are run by the Migrant Resource Centre across Tasmania.

    Phone: 03 6221 0999

    The Butterfly Foundation

     

    Visit the Butterfly Foundation website.

    Mental Health Families and Friends Tasmania   Visit the Mental Health Families and Friends Tasmania website.

    Advocacy

    Group

    Details

    Contact

    Mental Health Advocacy

    • Mental Health Advocacy is a free and confidential service helps people with a mental health disorder who have a complaint about existing services or a need to access services.
    • Mental Health Tribunal Representation Scheme offers free and competent representation for people on involuntary mental health orders who are having a hearing before the Mental Health Tribunal.

    Phone: 1800 005 131

    Email: [email protected]

    Visit Advocacy Tasmania website

    Official Visitors

    An independent group that:

    • visit in-patient and other statutory facilities to examine the adequacy of care and treatment provided to patients
    • examine the standard of the hospital environment and activities offered to patients
    • investigate complaints
    • investigate suspected contraventions of the Mental Health Act and report them to the Mental Health Tribunal

    Phone: 03 6233 9262

    Email: [email protected]

    Peak bodies

    Authority

    Details

    Contact

    Mental Health Council of Tasmania (MHCT)

    Peak body representing non-government mental health consumer organisations, carer organisations and service provider organisations. MHCT:

    • provides a public voice for people affected by mental illness and the community organisations that work with them. 

    • advocates for effective public policy on mental health for the benefit of the Tasmanian community as a whole.

    • offer free and competent representation for people on involuntary mental health orders having a hearing before the Mental Health Tribunal.

    Phone: 1800 808 890

    Visit the Mental Health Council of Tasmania website

    Flourish mental health action in our hands

     

    Visit the Flourish website

    Mental health families and friends Tasmania

     

    Visit the Mental Health Families and Friends Tasmania website.

    Statutory authorities

    Authority

    Details

    Contact

    Chief Psychiatrist Tasmania

     

    Visit the OCP website

    Mental Health Tribunal Representation Scheme

    This scheme offers free and competent representation for people on involuntary mental health orders having a hearing before the Mental Health Tribunal.

    Phone: 1800 005 131

    Email: [email protected]

    Visit the Mental Health Tribunal Scheme website

    Guardianship and Administration Board 

    Can make decisions for people with a disability that are unable to make reasonable judgements about lifestyle and financial matters.

    Phone: 1300 799 625

    Email: [email protected] 

    Visit the Guardianship Administration Board website

    Health Complaints Commissioner Tasmania

    Helps to resolve problems between Tasmanians and health services providers.

    Phone 1800 001 170
    Email: [email protected]

    Visit the Health Complaints Commissioner website

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    Most Australians will experience a mental health problem at some time in their lives.

    What is mental illness?

    Mental illness (also called mental health disorder) can significantly affect how you feel, think and behave. 

    Mental illness is a health issue and you can receive support from a range of health professionals, including a GP, psychologist, psychiatrist, neurologist, counsellor through public system services or private providers or community sector organisations.

    Types of mental illness

    There are different types of mental illnesses. These include:

    • depression
    • anxiety
    • schizophrenia
    • bipolar mood disorder
    • personality disorders
    • eating disorders.

    Depression and anxiety

    • The most common mental illnesses are anxiety and depression.
    • It is perfectly normal to experience tension, anxiety or sadness at points.
    • It may become overwhelming to the point where a person has difficulty with daily activities like work or spending time with friends
    • Some people might struggle to get out of bed or care for themselves physically, and if anxiety is really severe, some people feel like they can’t leave the house.
    • If you’re having difficulty coping or are feeling overwhelmed, help is available. As well as family, friends and colleagues, there are trained professionals who can support you.
    • Seeking and accessing help and support is not shameful.  

    What is psychosis?

    • Psychosis is a severe mental illness where you can lose touch with reality.
    • An episode of psychosis is often sudden onset (also sometimes called ‘acute’).
    • During a psychosis episode, a person’s ability to make sense of thoughts, feelings, and the world around them is seriously affected.
    • During a psychotic episode, someone may experience
      • Delusions.
      • Hallucinations – where someone sees, hears, smells or tastes things that are not there.
    • Psychotic episodes can be confusing and frightening to the person experiencing the episode, and the people around them

    How mental illness is treated

    • Most mental illnesses can be effectively treated or managed.
    • Recognising the early signs and symptoms of mental illness is important.
    • This helps you access medical treatment quickly.
    • The earlier treatment starts, the more likely you are to have a positive outcome.
    • Some people experience only one episode of mental illness and fully recover.
    • For other people, mental illness can recur throughout their lives.

    Types treatments for mental illness

    Some types of treatments include:

    • Cognitive, behavioural and psychological therapies
    • Psycho-social support
    • Psychiatric disability rehabilitation
    • Avoiding risk factors.
    • Medication

    Treatment plans should be decided on in partnership between the person and their treating team.

    How to support someone with a mental illness

    • People with a mental illness need support in the same way support is given to people with a physical illness.
    • Ask questions. Listen to their ideas. Most importantly, ask them what you can do to help.
    • Some people don't seek help. They may isolate themselves or hide their symptoms.
    • Include them in your everyday plans, like exercising or going to a café.
    • If they say no, let them know that is OK and invite them again another time.
    • Support them to get the care they need and want.
    • This may include helping them find information, or going to appointments or just listening to how they feel – depending on what they tell you they need.

    What services can I contact?

    Helpful websites with resources

    Links for young children and their parents

    Other helpful websites for families and carers

    Last updated

    In this section

    The involvement of patients, families and carers is essential to support the planning and delivery of mental health services in Tasmania. Your participation is a priority for our mental health services.

    Download the framework

    Consumer and carer liaison consultant

    Our Senior Consumer and Carer Liaison Consultant works with us to:

    • progress patient, family and carer participation in Tasmania
    • enable your input and involvement systematically and strategically into the planning and delivery of mental health services across Tasmania.

    Where to get more information

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    How to provide feedback

    Submit feedback for the Statewide Mental Health Service

    A family member or carer can also provide feedback on your behalf.

    Region

    Phone

    Email

    South/Forensic Health Services

    1800 811 911

    [email protected]

    North

    1800 008 001

    [email protected]

    North West

    1800 062 322

    [email protected]

    What happens if I make a complaint?

    If you, a family member or carer make a complaint, you can be assured that:

    • it will be handled sensitively and confidentially
    • it will not affect the quality of your ongoing care
    • special needs and circumstances will be taken into account
    • we will inform you about the progress and outcome of your complaint.

    Who reviews my complaint?

    • Our senior staff review and investigate any complaints.
    • We may contact you for more information if required.

    How can I get a response?

    Please provide your:

    • phone number
    • email
    • postal address.

    What happens next?

    If you have asked for a response, we will contact you with:

    • details of our process
    • who you can contact
    • when you should hear further from us.

    Where to get more assistance

    If you need further assistance you may wish to contact:

    Advocacy Tasmania – support for you to have your say and ensure your rights are protected.

    Official Visitors Program – for help, queries or concerns about mental health inpatient services.

    Health Complaints Commissioner – if you are not satisfied with a response to your complaint.

    Office of the Chief Psychiatrist.

    Carer and Consumer Liaison.

    CES and YES surveys

    Our services are implementing the YES and the CES under the 5th National Mental health and suicide prevention plan.

    Your Experience Survey (YES)

    The YES survey is designed to collect information from consumers about their experiences of care.

    By helping to identify specific areas where quality improvements can be made, the YES can support collaboration between mental health services and consumers to build better services.

    Learn more about the YES

    Carer Experience Survey (CES)

    The MH CES is about understanding the carer experience. 

    Learn more about the CES

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    • Human rights recognise everyone has the right to have the highest possible standard of physical and mental health.
    • Advocacy means to promote the cause of interest of someone or a group of people. In this case, the rights to mental health care.

    The Australian Charter of Healthcare Rights

    The Australian Charter of Healthcare Rights outlines the rights of what you or someone you care for can expect using Australia’s healthcare system.

    To find out more about your healthcare rights, visit the Australian Commission on Safety and Quality on Healthcare website.

    Your rights and responsibilities

    Your rights

    • Receive quality and professional services.
    • Be consulted about your own or your child’s care.
    • Receive private and confidential services (except when risk to self, others or abuse is reported) in accordance with the Personal information Protection Act.
    • Receive assistance from an interpreter if required.
    • Have somebody support you or speak on your behalf – a friend, family member or advocate.
    • Provide feedback about the service you are receiving.
    • Access information through procedures in the Right to Information Act 2009.

    Your responsibilities

    • Keep your appointment times or notify your treating facility if you are unable to attend
    • Participate in your own or your child’s care and treatment
    • Accept consequences of your informed decisions
    • Inform your treating facility when contact details change
    • Inform your clinician if you are seeking treatment from another service or agency
    • Ensure your child’s and your own conduct does not interfere with the rights of other clients or staff.

    For more information about your healthcare rights and responsibilities, visit For Patients on our website.

    Community engagement and participation

    • It is important you are involved in deciding your own healthcare and treatment.
    • We encourage you, your family and carers to participate in your health, wellbeing and care.
    • This helps achieve a better outcome for you.
    • We have three Consumer Community Engagement Councils (CCEC) in Tasmania. 
    • They provide a community point of view into how we deliver healthcare services.

    How we use and protect your personal information

    • As part of delivering your treatment and healthcare, we collect and hold your personal information.
    • This is in accordance with the Personal Information Protection Act 2004.

    To find out about how we use your personal information, download the:

    Where to get more information

    Office of the Chief Psychiatrist

    The Mental Health Act 2013 provides for the independent statutory positions in Tasmania of:

    • Chief Civil Psychiatrist
    • Chief Forensic Psychiatrist.

    Together with the Mental Health Tribunal and Official Visitors, the Chief Psychiatrists review and oversee how people with mental illness are assessed, treated and cared for in Tasmania.

    Find out more about the Office of the Chief Psychiatrist

    Partnering with Consumers Standard

    • The Australian Commission on Quality and Safety in Healthcare provide guidance about how you, your family and carers can be actively involved in planning and making decisions about care.
    • For more information, download their Partnering with Consumers Standard Fact Sheet.

    National Standards for Mental Health Services 2010

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    Mental health services

    In an emergency, please call 000.

    For support making a referral, contact Access Mental Health - Helpline 1800 332 388

    We offer a free, confidential service for adults 18-65 with severe and complex mental health problems. This includes assessment, treatment, support and education.

    Who will support you?

    Your assessment and treatment are provided by professional clinical teams and support staff. They may include:

    • mental health nurses
    • clinical psychologists
    • peer workers (consumers and carers)
    • social workers
    • occupational therapists
    • psychiatrists
    • other specialist medical staff.

    Services we provide

    Our Adult Mental Health Services team provides a range of services for people with complex mental health illness including:

    • advice and information about services to assist with mental illness
    • assessment, treatment and rehabilitation for people with serious mental illness
    • extended treatment, support and care for persistent or recurring mental illness.

    We also work with other providers, doctors (GPs), private health care providers and emergency services.

    Services locations

    Community team

    Service areas

    Hobart and Southern Districts

    Hobart, Kingsborough and Huon Valley

    Glenorchy and Northern Districts

    Glenorchy, Derwent Valley and Central Highlands

    Clarence and Eastern Districts

    Eastern Shore and East Coast

    Launceston and Northern Region

    Northern Tasmania (63 and 67 phone areas)

    North West Region

    North West Tasmania (64 and 65 phone areas)

    How to provide feedback

    We welcome your feedback.

    View how to provide feedback to Mental Health Services

    Other helpful services

    Service

    Phone

    Access Mental Health - Helpline

    1800 332 388

    Advocacy Tasmania Inc.

    1800 005 131

    Alcohol and Drug Service Tasmania

    1300 139 641

    Alcohol Drug Information Service [ADIS] (24 hr)

    1800 250 015

    Child Safety Service - Communities Tasmania (24 hr)

    1800 000 123

    Parent Line - Child Health & Parenting Services (24 hr)

    1300 808 178

    Family Violence Counselling and Support

    1800 608 122

    Lifeline (crisis counselling 24 hr)

    13 11 14

    Mental Health Families & Friends Tasmania

    03 6228 7448

    Official Visitors Program

    1800 001 170

    Q Life (LGBTI support)

    1800 184 527

    Relationships Australia (Tasmania)

    1300 364 277

    Sexual Assault Support Service (24 hr)

    1800 697 877

    Suicide Call Back Service (24 hr)

    1300 659 467

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    In an emergency, please call 000.

    For support making a referral to Child and Adolescent Mental Health Services, contact the Access Mental Health - Helpline 1800 332 388

    Child and Adolescent Mental Health Services (CAMHS) support Tasmanian infants, children and young people up to 18 years. Our services also include:

    • Perinatal and Infant Mental Health Service (for women and their families in southern Tasmania)
    • community family therapy.

    Download our Child and Adolescent Mental Health Services fact sheet

    What we do

    We work closely with families to provide support and specialist treatment. This includes assessment, education and treatment services for mental difficulties such as:

    • anxiety disorders
    • attachment disorders
    • autism spectrum disorders (assessment and/or mental health-related symptoms)
    • eating disorders
    • major depression and mood disorders
    • mental health concerns in pregnancy and following birth
    • psychosis
    • severe emotional trauma and adjustment problems
    • suicide risk and self-harm.

    We also provide community family therapy if your child is receiving support from us. 

    How to access our service

    Who will support you?

    We have a diverse team of health professionals experienced in working with young people. Our team work together and consult with each other on a regular basis. You will be supported by:

    • administrative support staff
    • child and perinatal psychiatrists
    • clinical nurse specialists
    • clinical psychologists
    • occupational therapists
    • psychiatric registrars
    • social workers
    • speech pathologist (available in the South only).

    How we help you

    Before we undertake any treatment and support, we consider:

    • your child and your family situation
    • how the treatment may impact their future
    • what other services may help or need to be involved.

    Referral process

    • If your referral is accepted, we allocate your case to a professional clinician.
    • Sometimes you might have to go on a waiting list.
    • If we have yours and your child’s permission, we will request information and reports from other services. For example, your child’s school or GP.

    Treatment process

    • At your first appointment we spend time talking with your child (and in some situations with you) about why they are here.
    • We also ask about school, medical concerns, who is in their family and how everyone gets on.
    • We also like to find out about what they like, skills and strengths.
    • Once we have a good idea of what the problem is, we will work on a care plan.
    • This is called an Individual Service Plan and includes your child’s goals and how to meet them.

    Individual service plans

    Individual service plans (ISPs) are agreements between your/your child and their clinician (case manager) about the diagnosis, treatment and its focus (and your goals). An ISP includes:

    • the major problems
    • treatment goals – how do you and your family want things to be?
    • strategies to achieve goals – what are we going to do to help?
    • people involved and their responsibilities
    • timeframes – how long will we try this for?

    We will regularly review the ISP so that we know we are on the right track.

    Assessments and treatments offered

    The following types of treatments may be offered under an ISP.

    Treatment

    Overview

    Community treatment

    Most treatment occurs in the community.

    It may also involve liaison with your child’s school and other significant people in their life.

    There are several types of treatment that may be recommended by your clinician.

    The decision to choose a particular treatment is usually determined by the type of mental health problem the child or adolescent is experiencing.

    Your clinician will offer treatment(s) known to be the most helpful with this type of problem and will discuss the reasons why these treatments have been chosen. A combination of therapies is often the most appropriate in addressing mental health problems efficiently.

    Treatments other than those outlined here are available.

    If one is recommended by your Clinician, ask for more information.

    Crisis intervention

    Crisis Intervention is a quick response to a serious, perhaps life-threatening, situation.

    This involves a brief assessment and planning so that a further crisis can be avoided.

    Assessment of specific aspects

    Assessment of specific difficulties may be recommended if we need more information to determine the most appropriate treatment plan.

    This may include assessment of sensory/sensory-motor development, and cognitive/thinking or problem-solving abilities.

    Medication

    Medication can be of value in the treatment of certain disorders.

    When medication is recommended it is usually in conjunction with other forms of therapy.

    Family therapy

    We invite close family members to be involved in finding solutions to current problems.

    Group therapy

    Group therapy enables patients to help each other through their interaction and an opportunity to belong under the guidance of experienced staff.

    Parental therapy

    We offer support to parents who have become stuck in negative cycles over their child’s problems on how to parent these children more effectively.

    Individual psychotherapy

    Psychotherapy is where we develop a therapeutic relationship with the patient to promote changes in their mental state and understanding of the world.

    Supportive therapy

    Supportive therapy involves assisting you to develop coping strategies in order to deal with your current situations.

    This may involve seeking out support groups in the community.

    Cognitive Behaviour Therapy

    Cognitive behaviour therapy is a technique used to assist you to overcome problems by thinking about them in a different way.

    Psychoeducation

    This provides information to the client or family about their mental health and answers questions that they may have about their condition.

    Your rights and personal information

    We welcome your feedback.

    View how to provide feedback to Mental Health Services

    Our facilities

    South

    Location

    Opening hours

    Clare House

    26 Clare Street

    New Town

    Monday to Friday

    8:45am - 5:00pm

     

    North

    Location

    Opening hours

    46 Cameron Street

    Launceston

    Monday to Friday

    8:30am – 4:30pm

     

    North West

    Location

    Opening hours

    5th Floor, Reece House

    46 Mount Street

    Burnie

    Monday to Friday

    8.30am - 5.00pm

    Community sector services and resources

    Helpful services

    Service

    Overview

    Contact details

    Taz Kidz Club

    Anglicare Tasmania

    Taz Kidz Clubs provides support to children aged between 7-17 whose parents have a mental illness. The Clubs run after school for eight weeks during the school semester. They provide support and education about mental illness through a variety of creative and artistic projects.

    Phone: 03 6213 3555

    Champs Camps

    Anglicare Tasmania

     

    Champs Camps provide support to children aged between 7-17 whose parents have a mental illness. Camps are held over two nights, five times a year to give young people and opportunity to get away and have fun. 

    Phone: 03 6213 3555

    Parenting Support Programs

    Anglicare Tasmania

    This are early intervention programs designed to support families with parental mental illness. 

    Phone: 03 6213 3555

     

    Helpful resources

    Please visit the following websites for helpful information and support.

    Last updated

    In an emergency, please call 000.

    For support making a referral to Older Persons Mental Health Services, contact Access Mental Health - Helpline 1800 332 388

    • We offer a free, confidential service for older adults with severe and complex mental health problems.
    • Our Older Persons Mental Health Service (OPMHS) deliver these services.
    • Treatment is provided through community services in support with your family and carers.
    • For dementia services, please visit the Dementia Behaviour Management Advisory Service website or call them on 1800 699 799.

    Download our Older Persons Mental Health Services brochure

    How to access our service

    • Contact Access Mental Health - Helpline on 1800 332 388.
    • This is a free call, confidential phone service available 24 hours, 7 days a week.
    • Referrals can also be made to OPMHS by your doctor or other psychiatric specialists by contacting the MHS Helpline.

    Who will support you?

    • Nurses.
    • Allied health professionals (for example psychologists, physiotherapists).
    • Medical officers.
    • Psychiatrists.
    • Support staff.

    Services we provide

    Our services are:

    • community teams across Tasmania
    • inpatient service for assessment and treatment
    • day centre program in southern Tasmania
    • case management.

    Case management

    • information, support and counselling for individuals and families
    • assessment of mental health problems
    • treatment advice and support in both community and inpatient settings
    • home visits
    • liaison and referrals with other healthcare professionals and service providers
    • community education and health promotion.

    Inpatient and day centre services

    The Roy Fagan Centre is our specialised hospital for older Tasmanians with psychiatric illness or cognitive impairment. The centre is located in Hobart and comprises:

    About the Roy Fagan Centre

    • We aim to provide a safe and secure environment at the Centre.
    • During your stay, your assessment, treatment and care is provided 24 hours a day by qualified staff.
    • If you have an advanced care plan, please let our team know upon your admission.

    For further information, please call 03 6166 6370 or download the brochure.

    About advance care planning

    Where our community services are located

    Location

    Phone

    North

    03 6777 4985

    North West

    03 6477 7737

    South

    03 6166 6783

    How to provide feedback

    We welcome your feedback.

    View how to provide feedback to Mental Health Services

    Other helpful services

    Service

    Phone

    Access Mental Health - Helpline

    1800 332 388

    Advocacy Tasmania Inc.

    1800 005 131

    Alcohol Drug Information Service [ADIS]

    1800 250 015

    Dementia Behaviour Management Advisory Service

    1800 699 799

    Family Violence Counselling and Support

    1800 608 122

    Guardianship and Administration Board

    1300 799 625

    Lifeline (crisis counselling 24 hr)

    13 11 14

    Mental Health Families & Friends Tasmania

    03 6228 7448

    My Aged Care (including carer respite)

    1800 200 422

    National Dementia Helpline

    1800 100 500

    Official Visitors Program

    1800 001 170

    Relationships Australia (Tasmania)

    1300 364 277

     

    Last updated

    Mental health information for health professionals

    The Mental Health Act 2013:

    • balances consumer rights with the need for treatment
    • recognises the important role carers, family members and friends of people with a mental illness play
    • enables individuals with capacity to make their own treatment choices
    • facilitates treatment for people who lack decision-making capacity and need treatment for their own health or safety or for the safety of others.

    Access the Mental Health Act 2013

    Forms and resources

    All resources and forms continue to be revised and updated. Access current information on:

    Where to get more information

    For immediate assistance, phone Lifeline or the Mental Health Helpline.

    Lifeline - 13 11 14

    Mental Health Helpline - 1800 332 388

    Office of the Chief Psychiatrist

    Contact the Office of the Chief Psychiatrist

    Last updated
    • Standing orders and clinical guidelines help and direct controlling authorities, medical practitioners, nurses, and other persons exercise responsibilities under the Mental Health Act 2013.
    • Each is approved by the Chief Civil Psychiatrist or Chief Forensic Psychiatrist.
    • The clinical guidelines and standing orders may be modified over time.
    • Please check these pages regularly to make sure you are using the most recent version.
    • If you identify any errors, please contact the Office of the Chief Psychiatrist. 

    Access forms and guidelines

    Last updated

    Our projects and initiatives

    Rethink 2020 is Tasmania’s strategic mental health plan. It is a shared approach to improving mental health outcomes for all Tasmanians. It strengthens the Government’s initial 2015 plan and focuses on new areas.

    • suicide prevention
    • improving coordination of services for people with severe and complex mental illness
    • improving the physical health of people with mental illness
    • providing ‘stepped care’ mental health services best suited to a person’s needs.

    Download the Rethink 2020 Strategic Plan.

    Download a summary of Rethink 2020.

    Rethink 2020 Implementation Plan

    • The Rethink 2020 Implementation Plan guides our approach and activities to deliver Rethink 2020.

    Download the Rethink 2020 Implementation Plan

    What’s in the Rethink 2020 Implementation Plan?

    The Plan focuses on critical partnerships. This is to ensure a consistent and integrated approach to best-practice mental health service planning and delivery. It outlines new activities against each reform direction and allocates responsibilities for delivery. It also includes activities under each of the new areas of focus:

    • suicide prevention
    • improving the coordination of services for people with severe and complex mental illness
    • improving the physical health of people with mental illness
    • providing mental health services across a ‘continuum of care’.

    Who is involved?

    The Implementation Plan is a collaboration between:

    It is endorsed by the Mental Health and Alcohol and Drug Leadership Group.

    Other partners and stakeholders

    How will the Plan be monitored?

    A framework for monitoring and evaluating achievements is under development. The Implementation Plan will be reviewed and updated each year to 30 June 2025 to:

    • be flexible and responsive to the changing national mental health and suicide prevention environment
    • reflect the outcomes of ongoing consultations.

    Where to get more information

    Mental Health, Alcohol and Drug Directorate

    Primary Health Tasmania

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    The Tasmanian Eating Disorder Service (TEDS) is an eating disorder treatment service in development in Hobart. It is funded by the Federal Government’s Community Health and Hospitals Program (CHHP) project. TEDS will have a high‑level model of care based on input provided by:

    Where to get more information

    Existing eating disorder treatment services

    Eating Disorder outpatient clinic website.

    Last updated

    If you are, or anyone else is in immediate danger, call 000.
    For crisis support, 24 hours a day, 7 days a week:

    Suicide is a significant issue in Tasmania. Every life lost to suicide comes at a high personal cost to families, friends and communities. The Tasmanian Government has increased funding into suicide prevention to:

    • deliver community action plans
    • take action at places known for repeat suicides.
    • develop a new Tasmanian Suicide Register
    • develop an early intervention referral pathways model following a suicide attempt or self-harm.

    For more information, download:

    Suicide prevention resources and websites

    For a hard copy of any resources, please contact the Mental Health, Alcohol and Drug Directorate

     

    Last updated

    Mental Health publications

    Rethink 2020: A State Plan for Mental Health in Tasmania 2020–2025 (Rethink 2020) is a plan to improve mental health outcomes for Tasmanians. Rethink 2020 represents the basis for a collaborative approach to mental health service planning and delivery that has the consumer and their loved ones at the centre.

    We aim to provide documents in an accessible format. If you are having problems using a document with your accessibility tools, please contact us for help.

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    Rethink 2020 is a state plan for mental health in Tasmania 2020–2025.

    We aim to provide documents in an accessible format. If you are having problems using a document with your accessibility tools, please contact us for help.

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    The Tasmanian Suicide Prevention Strategy (2016–2020) and its companion documents, the new Youth Suicide Prevention Plan for Tasmania (2016-2020) and the new Suicide Prevention Workforce Development and Training Plan for Tasmania (2016-2020), outline this Government’s plan for reducing suicide.

    We aim to provide documents in an accessible format. If you are having problems using a document with your accessibility tools, please contact us for help.

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    Learn about dental health

    • Taking care of your mouth, teeth and gums is important.
    • A healthy mouth helps you to eat, smile and speak.
    • It also helps you feel confident to socialise with other people and feel good about yourself.

    How do I clean my mouth, teeth and gums?

    It is very important to clean your teeth or dentures and your gums twice a day in the morning and at night.

    • Use a small, soft-bristled or powered toothbrush.
    • Use a pea-size amount of fluoride toothpaste. Fluoride helps strengthen teeth and protect against decay.
    • Spit out the toothpaste, but do not rinse.
    • Replace your toothbrush every three months or earlier if the bristles are worn.
    • Have a regular health check for your mouth, teeth and gum.

    Other important dental health tips

    • Drink plenty of tap water. Most tap water in Tasmania has fluoride added to it. This helps strengthen your teeth and prevent decay.
    • Avoid food and drinks containing sugar (like soft drinks) and acid (like fruit juice).
    • Eat a variety of healthy foods, especially vegetables and fruit. Learn more about healthy eating through the Australian Dietary Guidelines.
    • Chew sugar-free gum in between meals to stimulate saliva. This helps protect your teeth from decay.
    • Wear a mouthguard if you play a contact sport. These are sports where you may connect with someone else. Contact sports can include football, rugby, boxing, martial arts, hockey, soccer, netball, basketball, and more. To find out if you can get a mouth guard and for help fitting one, talk to your health professional at your appointment.
    • Try to quit smoking if you are a smoker. If you need help, please call Quitline on 13 78 48. Learn more about how smoking impacts dental health.

    Tips to look after your teeth

    What happens if you don't look after your dental health?

    It is important to take care of your mouth, teeth, and gums to prevent or reduce illness. These include:

    • tooth decay (this can cause your teeth to rot)
    • gum disease (known as gingivitis or periodontitis)
    • oral cancer
    • diabetes
    • heart disease and stroke
    • early onset dementia (symptoms caused by disorders affecting your brain)
    • respiratory conditions in older adults (these are illnesses that affect your breathing)
    • giving birth to pre-term or low-weight babies.

    Make a dental appointment

    Learn about accessing dental health services for adults in Tasmania. This includes costs, locations and other dental information.

    Read more about our dental health services for adults

    Last updated

    It is important to take regular care of your mouth, teeth and gums to prevent disease and illness. This includes if you wear dentures.

    How to clean your teeth

    Use a small soft or powered toothbrush and a pea-sized amount of fluoride toothpaste to brush your teeth twice a day (morning and night). Toothpaste contains fluoride which helps strengthen your teeth and prevent decay.

    • Start with the outside surfaces.
    • Brush the inside surfaces.
    • Brush the chewing surfaces.
    • Brush behind your teeth.
    • Brush your tongue to help freshen your breath.
    • Spit, don't rinse.

    Download a poster for how to clean your teeth

     You can also download an Easy Read fact sheet on Caring for your teeth from the Council for Intellectual Disability

    How to care for your dentures

    • Clean full or partial dentures every day with mild soap and a soft brush
    • Use another soft toothbrush to clean your gums, tongue, and roof of your mouth
    • Brush any natural teeth with a soft toothbrush and fluoride toothpaste
    • Spit, don’t rinse.

    Learn about dentures

    Other important dental health tips

    Learn more ways take care of your mouth, teeth and gums.

    Make a dental appointment

    Learn about accessing dental health services for adults in Tasmania. This includes costs, locations and other dental information.

    Read more about our dental health services for adults

    Last updated

    Helping your kids develop healthy habits can help prevent tooth decay and protect their teeth for life.

    Having healthy baby teeth is important

    This will help your baby with:

    • eating, biting, chewing and grinding foods
    • learning to speak
    • having the right space for adult teeth to grow
    • developing jaw and mouth muscles.

    Give your children's teeth a healthy start

    You can download our Personal Health Record Book insert.

    Caring for your child’s mouth, teeth and gums

    • Your child will grow teeth at different ages. They may still have their back baby molar teeth at age 11-12.
    • Start cleaning your baby’s teeth as soon as they start to get teeth.
    • You will need to help your children to brush their teeth until 7–8 years of age.

    How to clean your child’s teeth

    A healthy mouth is important for the whole family. Be a role model for your children by brushing your teeth morning and night.

    • Every family member must have their own toothbrush.
    • Help your child to brush their teeth until 7–8 years of age.
    • Don’t encourage thumb and finger sucking. After age four, this can affect the position of your child’s teeth and their speech.

    What to use

    • Use a small, soft toothbrush to help your child to brush their teeth morning and night.
    • Use water only until your baby is 17 months. Do not use toothpaste.
    • Use a pea-sized amount of low fluoride children’s toothpaste between 18 months and five years.
    • Use a pea-sized amount of adult fluoride toothpaste when your child turns five.

    How to clean

    • Start with a damp soft cloth to gently wipe the gums and teeth if your baby’s teeth have just started to come through.
    • Sit your child either on your lap facing away or sideways to you or stand behind them.
    • Tilt your child’s head back against your body so you can see all the surfaces of the teeth.
    • Brush in gentle circles on the inside and outside surfaces of the teeth and gums.
    • Use a light back and forth motion on the chewing surfaces of the teeth.
    • Encourage your child to spit out the toothpaste and not to swallow it. Do not rinse.

    The following video from Dental Health Services Victoria shows how to care for children’s teeth and tips for successful toothbrushing sessions.

    View our poster on how to clean your child's teeth here

    How to prevent tooth decay

    What is tooth decay?

    • Tooth decay occurs when a hole forms in a tooth. This is called a cavity.
    • Tooth decay can affect people of all ages. Baby teeth can decay as soon as they appear.
    • Tooth decay is very common in children. It is the main reason for avoidable hospital visits of children under five.

    Checking for tooth decay

    • It is important to lift your child’s top lip regularly to check for signs.
    • White lines along the gum line can be the beginning of tooth decay.
    • If you notice any changes, please visit an oral health professional quickly. They can help reverse early stages of tooth decay.

    Learn how to recognise signs of decay

    Preventing tooth decay

    Tooth decay is easy to avoid by ensuring your child:

    • has good teeth cleaning habits
    • enjoys healthy meals and drinks
    • starts regular dental care from a professional from 12-months of age.

    Dental health for babies

    Healthy baby teeth are important. Baby teeth can decay as soon as they appear. Make your baby’s first dental appointment at around 12 months of age.

    Learn more about healthy teeth for babies

    Teething

    If your child has a fever (above 38 degrees Celsius) and diarrhoea, seek medical advice urgently. If you have any concerns get advice from your medical practitioner.

    If your baby seems more irritable, is dribbling, has red cheeks or swollen gums, they may be growing teeth. You can make them more comfortable by:

    • gently massaging their gums with clean fingers or a soft, wet cloth
    • giving them chilled (but never frozen) teething rings or unsweetened rusks (after the age of six months).

    Bottle feeding

    Healthy food and drinks

    • Breast milk and infant formula are the best drinks.
    • Tap water should be boiled and cooled before drinking.
    • Fruit juice and other sweet drinks are not recommended.
    • The best meals are those made at home from simple ingredients with no added sugar, honey or salt.
    • Avoid sharing spoons with your child.

    Dummies

    • If you are breastfeeding, don't start using a dummy until you are comfortable with how to breast feed.
    • Don’t put anything sweet on a dummy.
    • Clean the dummy under running water. Do not put in your own mouth as you may pass on decay-producing germs to your child.
    • Avoid using a dummy during play hours as it prevents your baby from babbling and sound making. This is important for their speech development.
    • You can start helping your child to give up their dummy from 12-months. Speak to your doctor or oral health professional for advice.

    Dental health for children aged 12-months and older

    Healthy teeth are important every age.

    Download our flyer on stopping tooth decay for 2-5 year old kids.

    Healthy food and drinks

    • From 12 months, children can enjoy the healthy foods you feed your whole family. Touching, chewing, tasting and texture experience is very important.
    • Plain, full-cream milk and tap water are the best drinks for children. They do not need baby formula.
    • Most tap water has fluoride added. This helps strengthen teeth and protect them from decay.
    • The best healthy snacks are fresh fruit, chopped vegetables, plain yoghurt with no added sugar, cheese, wholemeal or wholegrain sandwiches and wholegrain dry biscuits.
    • It is better to offer whole fruit instead of juice.
    • Allow one-and-a-half hours break between each meal and snack.

    Things to avoid

    • Don’t give your children sugar. It increases risk of tooth decay. This includes food and drinks that say ‘no added sugar’ on the label. Learn how much sugar is in common foods.
    • Do not give your children sweet drinks. These are flavoured milks, soft drinks, flavoured cordials, 100% orange juice and other fruit drinks.
    • Limit use of food pouches. Chewing food helps make jaw muscles strong for talking and eating.
    • Avoid sharing spoons with your child.

    View a poster showing which drinks to give and to not give your child for good oral health

    Your child’s first trip to the dentist

    Our dental staff are very experienced in managing young children. You can help by letting them be the focus of your child's attention.

    Helping your child prepare for their appointment

    • Be positive about the dental visit
    • Treat it just like an everyday outing
    • Take time at home to pretend to count their teeth
    • Talk about the special chair ride and the cool sunglasses
    • Bring along their favourite toy for a ride

    What to do on the day

    • Try to arrive a little early so your child can get used to the new surroundings
    • Appointments work much better when your child is not tired. Try an appointment early in the day
    • If you have any worries about your child's visit, talk to our staff before the appointment
    • Don't worry!

    Who will do the treatment?

    • Dental and oral health therapists provide most of the dental care in a friendly and caring environment.
    • Occasionally we may refer your child to see a dentist, should this be required it will be discussed with you.

    How to book a dental appointment for your child

    We provide free dental care to children under 18 years of age if you have a Medicare Card.
    We have clinics available across Tasmania.

    Read more about our Dental Health Service for Babies, Children and Teens or call 1300 011 013 to make an appointment.

    Other resources

    We have a range of partners who can provide more information on good dental health for children and families.

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    Dental health services

    Dental services for adults are provided from six major dental centres:

    • Burnie
    • Devonport
    • Launceston
    • Clarence
    • Glenorchy
    • Hobart.

    Accessing adult dental health services

    • You must hold a current Pensioner Concession Card or Health Care Card.
    • If you don’t have one of these cards, you will need to book a private dentist.

    How to make an appointment

    • Call 1300 011 013 and speak to one of our friendly team.
    • We will ask you questions about what you need. This is called ‘triaging’.
    • If your problem is urgent, you will be offered an appointment to treat this problem only.
    • If your treatment is not urgent, you may be placed on a waiting list.
    • Once you reach the top of the waitlist, all your work is scheduled
    • We will book you as many appointments as you need to complete your treatment.

    If you are not feeling well, please call 1300 011 013 to cancel or reschedule.

    How much appointments cost

    You will need to pay for some of your treatment. This is called a co-payment contribution.

    Find out co-payment costs for different services below or download this information sheet on co-payment costs.

    Our staff will discuss co-payments with you before treatment is provided.

    Co-payments for adults (applicable from 1 July 2022)

    Type of dental care Co-payment amount
    General dental care, such as a check-up, scale and clean and fillings. $45 per appointment
    Priority dental care to treat an urgent single dental problem. $45
    Some high-cost treatments incur additional co-payments. These will be discussed at your appointment.
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    We offer dental health services for babies, children and teens up until the age of 18 living in Tasmania.

    • We help Australian citizens, permanent residents and asylum seekers.
    • Non-Medicare cardholders (including international students living in Tasmania) will need to contact a private dentist.
    • We can help in an emergency if you are in a remote area and there is no private dentist.

    What services we can provide

    Our dental and oral health therapists provide most of the dental care. These include:

    • examination and check-up of the mouth, teeth and gums
    • any necessary treatment decided upon when you have your check-up
    • any preventative treatment (for example cleaning and x-rays)
    • advice on healthy eating
    • tips on how to care for your mouth, teeth and gums
    • mouthguards (for eligible children/teens)

    If you need to be referred to a dentist, we will discuss this with you.

    How much dental services cost?

    What happens when you turn 18?

    • If you or your child turns 18 during treatment, your planned treatment will be completed.
    • Once you or your child turn 18, any new or further dental care can continue at one of our major centres.
    • You need to have a current Health Care Card or Pensioner Concession Card. Learn more about Dental Health Services for Adults or call 1300 011 013 to make an appointment.
    • If you or your child are no longer eligible to use our service, any new treatment will need to be through a private dental provider.

    How to make an appointment

    Dental and oral health services for children are available across Tasmania.

    How to make a telehealth appointment

    To help support you, we invite you to chat with one of our friendly dental team members via telephone or video link from the comfort of your own home.

    • Fill out the telehealth appointment form or call us on 1300 011 013 and a member of our dental team will arrange a time with you.
    • Telehealth appointments will be made between 9:00am and 4:30pm Monday to Friday (except public holidays).

    If you or your child are not feeling well, please call 1300 011 013 to cancel, reschedule or to make a telehealth appointment.

    Some of our clinics have varied opening hours after Covid-19 restrictions. You can view the full list of clinics and make an appointment.

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    Special care dental services are provided in hospitals. They are available:

    Special care dental health appointments

    • Special care dental services are available to you by referral only.
    • A referral means that the person treating you will tell us that you need this service.
    • We will contact you to make an appointment.
    • It is important to understand that if you go to the Emergency Department after hours or on the weekend, you cannot receive a referral and you will need to contact us yourself on opening hours to get an appointment. You can contact us on 1300 011 013.

    Waiting times for special care dental health services

    • We prioritise appointments according to urgency.
    • You may experience some waiting time for treatment.
    • We will let you know how long you may have to wait.

    Special care dental health unit locations

    In Tasmania, these services are provided at:

    Region Address
    North

    Launceston General Hospital (map)
    Level 2, Launceston General Hospital
    274-280 Charles Street, Launceston

    Learn more about Launceston General Hospital parking and access

    North West

    North West Regional Hospital (map)
    North West Regional Hospital
    23 Brickport Road, Burnie

    Learn more about North West Regional Hospital parking and access

    South

    Royal Hobart Hospital (map)
    Royal Hobart Hospital, Wellington Clinics
    Level 11, 42 Argyle Street, Hobart

    Learn more about the Royal Hobart Hospital parking and access

    Special care dental health service costs

    • There is no cost if you are under 18 or are already admitted to hospital.
    • All other patients may need to pay some of the costs towards your treatment.
    • If you need dentures there will also be some costs to pay.
    • Your dentist will discuss any costs with you at the appointment.

    How to pay for treatment

    If you must pay any costs, we will send you an invoice after your appointment. This tells you:

    • how much you need to pay
    • when the fee is due
    • how to pay.

    You can read more about how to pay for dental health services here.

    Last updated

    For health professionals

    You can use this form to refer adults to Dental Health Services for adults.

    Fill it out and fax or email it to the appropriate address.

    Referring children to dental health services

    • Tell the child’s parent or guardian that their child would benefit from a dental appointment with us or with a private dentist.
    • If the parent or guardian consents, you can refer the patient to us, and we will contact the parent to make an appointment. We provide free dental treatment for ALL children under 18 years of age if parents present their Medicare card for bulk billing.
    • Complete our referral form and email it to us.

    See our Lift The Lip Screening and Referral Pathway Tool
    Download the Lift The Lip Child referral form

    What happens after you make you referral?

    • We contact the parent or guardian to arrange a dental appointment.
    • We provide you feedback when the child completes their dental care
    • We will tell you if they fail to attend the scheduled appointment if we can’t contact their parent or guardian.

    How to refer a pregnant woman

    • Pregnant women living in Tasmania are eligible for a priority appointment with us if they have a current Health Care Card or Pensioner Concession Card or are aged under 18.
    • Advise all other pregnant adult women to visit a private dentist for treatment.
    • If a pregnant woman is eligible for priority dental care, please complete a referral form.
    • Pregnant women can also self-refer by ringing 1300 011 013 and letting us know that they are pregnant.

    Download the Healthy Smiles for Two referral form

    Referring to Special Dental Services

    • Referrals can be made using the Special Care Dental Services Referral Form.
    • Hospital inpatient referrals can be made on the Hospital’s Consultation Request Form.
    • Referrals should provide enough detail for the Regional Senior Clinician to assess clinical need and prioritise patients accordingly.
    • We may decide that the patient does not need to be seen at the Special Care Dental Unit. We will then arrange for the patient to be seen at a one of our major dental centres.
    • Each referral is valid for 3 months from acceptance by Oral Health Services Tasmania.
    • You can email or fax the form to us.

    Medical treatments or conditions that may lead to referral include (but are not limited to):

    • Radiation oncology/Head and neck radiotherapy
    • Medical oncology (including medications to slow bone metabolism)
    • Organ transplant
    • Heart valve replacement
    • Patients at risk of medication related osteonecrosis of the jaws (MRONJ)
    • Poorly controlled diabetes
    • Haemophilia or significant coagulopathy
    • Hepatitis C
    • Confirmed anaphylactic reactions to dental drugs and materials
    • Endocrinology
    • HIV
    • Inpatients of the hospital with dental emergencies, dental infections, or dental condition/s impacting on their recovery.

    Download the special dental care services fact sheet
    Download the special dental care services referral form

    Last updated

    We support a program designed to help you stop smoking. It is important to consider quitting smoking to improve your oral and general health.

    Why you should stop smoking

    Smoking and tobacco use can increase your chance of:

    • developing gum disease and bone loss
    • developing oral cancers
    • developing abnormal spots or sores that may lead to cancer
    • poor wound healing after surgery or extractions
    • tooth loss and sensitivity
    • bad breath
    • loss of taste sensation
    • stained teeth.

    Learn more about smoking and your dental health

    Learn more about quitting smoking and the program

    Last updated

    Selected eligible patients who have reached the top of our denture waiting list are offered a voucher to have their dentures made by a contracted private provider. 

    • The patient will contact us in person or via telephone to accept the offer.
    • They will collect their voucher and list of participating private providers.
    • They will select a provider and make an appointment.
    • We will email or fax the Authority & Claim to you or they will bring it to their appointment.
    • When the patient receives their dentures, they must send the completed Authority & Claim Form back to us for payment. Please include any treatment notes. 
    • Payment is at the current DVA rates for Dental Prosthetists.

    For further information, please refer to Part D of the OHST Outsourcing Programs Contract, or contact Oral Health Services Tasmania.

    Last updated

    What the Department is doing

    We run a fissure sealant and fluoride varnish program for school-aged children who are getting their new back adult teeth. This preventive program offers a safe, easy and painless way of protecting their teeth from decay.

    Why we run this program

    • Fissure sealants can help prevent and reduce tooth decay on the biting surfaces of the back adult teeth.
    • Fluoride varnish can prevent decay and strengthen both the baby and adult teeth.

    How to enrol your child

    If your child attends one of the priority schools and is in Kindergarten, Prep or Grade 1, 2, 6 or 7, you will receive a consent form from your school. Please fill it in, sign it, and return it to the school office.

    How the program works

    • A Dental or Oral Health Therapist and a Dental Assistant will treat your child.
    • They bring all equipment needed to your child’s school.
    • They use a room at the school or set up the dental van on the school grounds. 
    • All treatment is done during school hours.
    • Your child is collected from their classroom to be seen by our dental team.
    • After your child has been seen, they will return to their classroom.
    • We will let you know what treatment your child has received.

    How to enrol your child

    If your child attends one of the participating schools and is in one of the eligible grades they will receive a consent form from the school to take part.

    Current schools taking part

    For a full list of the schools taking part in this program, click your region below:

    Frequently asked questions

    We will bulk bill Medicare for the treatments provided in the program. There is no cost to you, even if you have reached your dental cap?

    Children without a Medicare Card can participate in the program for free. Any ongoing treatment will need to be provided by a private dentist.

    • The program provides preventive interventions only. It is not a dental check-up.
    • If we notice that your child has any dental needs, we will contact you and help you book an appointment at one of our clinics if your child is eligible for public dental care.
    Last updated

    This program provides priority access to dental care for eligible pregnant women in Tasmania.

    • Keeping your mouth, teeth and gums healthy during and after your pregnancy is important for your health and your unborn baby.
    • Your baby will have less chance of developing tooth decay if your mouth is healthy during pregnancy. This is because once the baby is born; decay-producing bacteria can be passed from the mother to the baby.
    • It is very safe and strongly recommended to have dental treatment during pregnancy.

    Learn more about the program
    Learn what to expect at your appointment

    How much the program costs

    • You will need to pay for some of the cost. This is called a co-payment.
    • The co-payment is $45 per appointment.
    • If you are under 18, you will be bulk billed through Medicare.

    What the program involves

    • If you are pregnant, you receive priority general dental treatment with us without going on a waiting list.
    • When treatment is completed, we plan a 12-month follow-up appointment for you and your baby.
    • Your baby’s first dental visit is an important time, and we’ll help you establish healthy habits for your baby.

    How to take part

    • If you are eligible, your midwife, GP or other health professional will contact us. This is called a referral.
    • You can also refer yourself by ringing 1300 011 013 and letting us know that you are pregnant.
    • On receipt of the referral, we will contact you to schedule a priority appointment at your nearest clinic.

    How to find out if you are eligible

    If you are pregnant and live in Tasmania, you are eligible for a priority appointment if:

    •  you have a current Health Care Card or Pensioner Concession Card
    • are under 18 years of age.

    If you are a pregnant adult, and do not have a concession card, please visit a private dentist for treatment.

    Last updated

    Tooth decay can affect babies and young children. This decay is preventable.

    • You can check your child’s teeth for early signs of decay by lifting your child's top lip and checking the surfaces of their top front teeth.
    • Preventive measures like applying fluoride can help stop tooth decay if found early.
    • Speak to your health professional for more advice or a referral to this program.

    Learn about dental health for children
    See our Lift the Lip Referral Tool for Health professionals

    Last updated

    Dental health publications and resources

    We aim to provide documents in an accessible format. If you are having problems using a document with your accessibility tools, please contact us for help.

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    Oral Health Promotion Strategic Plan 2017-2022
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    We aim to provide documents in an accessible format. If you are having problems using a document with your accessibility tools, please contact us for help.

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    Smoking and your oral health
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    We aim to provide documents in an accessible format. If you are having problems using a document with your accessibility tools, please contact us for help.

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    Lift the Lip – Anticipatory Guidance
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    Learn about ageing and aged care

    As you age, it is important to be aware of:

    • common health conditions
    • their signs
    • how to prevent them.

    Common conditions are listed below.

    For information about other health conditions you may experience as you age, please visit the HealthDirect website.

    Alzheimer's disease and dementia

    Bone health and osteoporosis

    From your 40’s onwards, your bones gradually lose their density. Learn more about how to keep your bones healthy and avoid osteoporosis on the HealthDirect website.

    Falls

    Anyone can be at risk of having a fall, but some older adults are more vulnerable than others. Learn more about preventing falls.

    Glaucoma and eye health

    Glaucoma is a group of eye diseases that damage the optic nerve. Learn more on the:

    Hearing loss

    Hearing loss is usually permanent. You can protect your hearing by avoiding loud noise. Learn more on the:

    High blood pressure (hypertension)

    High blood pressure is common but often has no symptoms. Learn how to keep your blood pressure under control on the HealthDirect website.

    Incontinence

    Incontinence can be treated, managed and even cured. Learn more about incontinence on the HealthDirect website.

    Mental health and depression

    Parkinson's disease

    Parkinson’s disease results from damage to nerve cells in the brain, which impacts the smooth control of muscles and movement. Learn more about Parkinson's disease on the HealthDirect website.

    Community transport services

    Community Transport Services Tasmania (CTST) provides transport assistance to aged, disabled and disadvantaged people in Tasmania.

    • We provide transport for social and non-emergency medical needs.
    • Our service is delivered by volunteers.
    • We operate an accredited fleet of vehicles across Tasmania.

    Where to get more information

    Seniors cards

    • The Tasmanian Government provides a card giving business and government discounts to seniors. This is called the Seniors Card. 
    • Almost 600 businesses and services support the Seniors Card Program.
    • They offer you a diverse range of discounted products and services throughout Tasmania.

    Where to get more information

    As you get older, living independently in your own home can become more difficult. If you’re finding it harder to do the things you used to, you can ask for some help. There are different types of aged care including:

    • help at home (to allow you to stay at home but support you with some tasks)
    • short-term and respite care (after a hospital stay or if your carer needs a break)
    • residential aged care (you move and live at the facility for full-time care).

    Learn more on the My Aged Care website.

    Being assessed

    • To find out if you are eligible for subsidised aged care you need to be assessed.
    • This process works out your needs and what services could help you.
    • The first step is an eligibility check. You can do this online or over the phone.
    • Then you will have an in-person assessment.

    Check your eligibility at the My Aged Care website.

    Residential aged care

    Residential aged care (also known as a nursing home) is a place for older people to live if they:

    • can no longer live at home
    • need ongoing help with everyday tasks or health care.

    The Australian government funds a range of aged care homes across Australia. Learn more about residential aged care on the My Aged Care website.

    We have Department-funded state residential aged care services in Tasmania:

    • Beaconsfield District Health Service: Residential Aged Care
    • Campbell Town Health and Community Service: Residential Aged Care
    • Flinders Island Multi-Purpose Centre - Residential Aged Care
    • King Island District Hospital and Health Centre - Residential Aged Care
    • Lyell House (West Cost District Hospital) - Residential Aged Care
    • Midlands Multi-Purpose Health Centre - Residential Aged Care

    To access these services Visit My Aged Care or call 1800 200 422 for information about respite care services in your area.

    Home care packages

    Home Care Packages (HCP) can provide affordable care services to get some help at home. They can help if you have complex care needs beyond the Commonwealth Home Support Programme. Depending on your package, you can get assistance with:

    • bathing, hygiene, and grooming
    • nursing
    • podiatry, physiotherapy, and other therapies
    • meals and food preparation
    • impairments or continence
    • cleaning, laundry, and other chores
    • home or garden maintenance
    • changes to your home
    • aids to stay independent
    • transport
    • social outings, groups and visitors.

    Learn more about home care packages on the My Aged Care website.

    Commonwealth Home Support Programme

    The Commonwealth Home Support Programme (CHSP) helps you access entry-level support services to live independently and safely at home. This helps you maintain your independence rather than doing things for you.

    Learn more about the CHSP on the My Aged Care website.

    Learn more about services provided in Tasmania on our website.

    Learn about healthy ageing

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    Learn more about healthy ageing

    Please note

    The information on this page is of a general nature. If you have any health concerns or need individualised advice, talk to your GP or an Accredited Practising Dietitian.

    Eating well is important as you get older. It helps you to: 

    • stay healthy 
    • be independent (this means to look after yourself) 
    • live in your own home. 

    Appetite for Life Manual

    • The Appetite for Life Manual helps health and community workers support independent living older people. 
    • It provides nutrition advice and guidelines.

    View the Appetite for Life Manual

    Learn more about supporting older people to eat well

    Please note

    The information on this page is of a general nature. For older people with existing health conditions, it is a good idea to see your GP for a check-up before starting a physical activity.

    What is physical activity?

    • Physical activity is anything that gets your body moving, makes you breathe faster and speeds up your heart rate. 
    • Physical activity includes incidental exercise (eg walking to a bus stop), exercise (eg going to the gym), sport (eg playing tennis) and muscle strengthening activities.  
    • Physical activity can be either light (eg stretching or walking), moderate (eg a brisk walk) or vigorous (eg jogging).  
    •  Staying active as you get older is important for good mental and physical health and wellbeing.

    Benefits of being physically active

    Physical benefits

    • Reduce the risk of health issues (for example high blood pressure, high cholesterol, type 2 diabetes, bone and joint problems, heart disease and some cancers)
    • Reduce the risk of having a fall
    • Make it easier to live by yourself in your own home for longer
    • Improves energy levels and sleep
    • Helps to manage health conditions

    Mental benefits

    • Helps manage stress 
    • Reduces the risk of anxiety and depression 
    • Improves concentration 
    • Improves memory 

    Social benefits

    • Getting out and being active is a great way to connect with your friends and family 
    • Spend time playing with your grandchildren 
    • Encourage each other by walking with friends 
    • Join a physical activity group to meet new people 

    Other benefits

    • Walking instead of driving can help save the cost of petrol and parking fees  
    • Staying healthy can reduce your healthcare costs in the long-term 
    • Walking and cycling reduces your impact on the environment

    Appetite for Life Manual

    • This information is from the Appetite for Life Manual.  
    • It has practical fact sheets to help health and community workers support clients.  
    • It includes information on physical activity. 

    View the Appetite for Life Manual here

    • During very hot weather, you have a greater risk of getting sick.  
    • Some people may experience the effects of hot weather more than others. 
    • It’s important to know what these effects are, who is at risk and what you can do. 
    • Heatstroke is a medical emergency. 
    • Get treatment straight away. 

    Read more about extreme heat

     

    Extreme heat risks for older people

    You may have a greater risk of heat-related illness if: 

    • you live alone 
    • have a medical condition  
    • take certain medicines 
    • are frail 
    • can’t move easily 
    • have dementia 
    • have a mental illness. 

    Caring for an older person during extreme heat

    • Check on an older person twice a day during extreme heat. Especially if they live alone.  
    • Visit them if you can, rather than just talking on the phone.  
    • Ensure they are drinking enough water 
    • Look for any changes to their physical condition. 
    • Have plans to keep them cool if there is a power failure. 
    • Check if their phone and safety alarm pendant work if there is no electricity. 
    • It is very important to take care of yourself too. 

    Heat-related symptoms in older people

    Lookout for symptoms of heat-related illness such as: 

    • increased thirst 
    • tiredness 
    • feeling dizzy or faint 
    • muscle spasms or cramps 
    • headache 
    • loss of appetite. 

    What to do if they have heat stress

    • Help cool them down straight away. 
    • Use cool baths or showers, or place cool, wet towels on their neck and underarms. 
    • Call a doctor or an ambulance (000) if their condition does not improve within an hour. 
    • Access two free online training packages with videos, interactive activities and practical tips. 
    • These are for community and health care workers and volunteers who work with older people. 
    • They can help you increase your confidence in understanding the nutrition needs of clients. 
    • The training takes about one hour to complete all at once.  
    • You can break it up into shorter sections. 
    • See the online fact sheet for important instructions to help the training run properly.

    Download the online training fact sheet

    Nutrition for older people online training 

    Learn about the nutrition needs of older people, common nutrition issues and how to manage them. 

    Malnutrition in older people online training 

    Practice using resources and tools to screen for malnutrition and reduce malnutrition risk. 

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    Aged Care Services

    Our Community Health Services Centres offer a range of local services including:

    • home-based nursing
    • help with household tasks and personal care
    • home maintenance
    • referrals to other health and community services.

    View service pricing information.

    The Australian Government Department of Health funds these programs for older people. To access these services, you need to apply for assessment through My Aged Care or call 1800 200 422.

    Types of services you can access

    Domestic Assistance (Help in the Home)

    These service supports domestic chores, including but not limited to, assistance with:

    • cleaning
    • dish washing
    • clothes washing
    • ironing
    • shopping
    • paying bills.

    Personal care

    This service helps you with daily self-care tasks, including but not limited to:

    • eating
    • bathing
    • toileting
    • dressing
    • grooming
    • getting in and out of bed
    • moving about the house.

    Home maintenance and modification

    This service supports you to maintain your home, garden and/or yard to keep it in a safe condition. Home maintenance includes minor repairs and maintenance, including but not limited to:

    • changing light bulbs
    • carpentry
    • painting
    • replacing tap washers.

    This service can also support you in making changes to your home so you can continue to live and move safely about the house. Home modifications may include:

    • grab rails
    • handrails
    • ramps
    • shower rails
    • installation of emergency alarms
    • and other items as prescribed.

    Transport

    Transport services help you with shopping and keeping appointments and may include travel for social activities and visiting friends. Community transport may also be provided to help you to get to:

    • doctor’s appointments
    • x-rays and other diagnostic services
    • the chemist for prescriptions.
    • Other appointments as required.

    Food services

    If you have difficulty preparing meals, food services deliver them to your home. They also provide meals at a community or day centre. Food services may include help with:

    • food shopping
    • food storage
    • meal preparation.

    Some services include traditional, culturally appropriate meals.

    Community nursing

    Nursing services may be provided in your home or at a community health centre by a qualified nurse. These services may be provided to you on a semi-regular or occasional basis.

    Allied health services

    Allied health services help you to remain mobile and lead an independent life. They can be provided at home, day centre or a community health service. These services include but are not limited to:

    • physiotherapy
    • podiatry
    • speech therapy
    • occupational therapy.

    Social Support

    Social Support services assist people to participate in community life helping people to engage in their communities. Services may include but not limited to:

    • Visiting services
    • Telephone services
    • Helping people with shopping or other activities.

    How much you pay for aged care services depends on: 

    • the type of help you need
    • the provider you choose
    • your financial situation
    • the services you receive.

    For general costs and pricing, please use the calculator tool on the MyAgedCare website.

    To find a Tasmanian provider and their costs please visit the MyAgedCare website.

    Residential aged care costs

    View the costs and key features of residential aged care services across Tasmania.

    Commonwealth Home Support Programme (CHSP) Costs

    The tables below outline the costs you will contribute to any CHSP services.

    Allied health services help you to remain mobile and lead an independent life. They can be provided at home, day centre or a community health service.

    Service Basis Pensioner

    Pensioner cap

    (per week)

    Non-pensioner

    Non-pensioner cap

    (per week)

    Individual Visit n/a n/a n/a n/a

    Group session prices are determined by activity provided. 

    These services support domestic chores, daily self-care tasks, maintenance of your home, garden and/or yard to keep it in a safe condition and making changes to your home so you can continue to live and move safely about the house.

    Service Basis Pensioner

    Pensioner cap

    (per week)

    Non-pensioner

    Non-pensioner cap

    (per week)

    Domestic Assistance Visit $5.00 $10.00 $20.00 $30.00
    Personal Care Visit $5.00 $10.00 $20.00 $30.00
    Home Maintenance^ Visit $5.00 $10.00 $20.00 $30.00

    Home Modification visit prices are quoted by service at the time of initial assessment/review.

    ^In addition to the standard fee, all goods and services required to complete the job including materials will be invoiced to you.

    If you have difficulty preparing meals, food services can deliver them to your home.

    Meal Basis Pensioner

    Pensioner cap

    (per week)

    Non-pensioner

    Non-pensioner cap

    (per week)

    Main Course Meal $7.80 n/a $7.80 n/a
    Soup Meal $1.70 n/a $1.70 n/a
    Sweets Meal $2.20 n/a $2.20 n/a
    Sandwiches Meal $4.50 n/a $4.50 n/a
    Fruit Meal $1.50 n/a $1.50 n/a

    Nursing services may be provided in your home or at a community health centre by a qualified nurse.

    Basis Pensioner

    Pensioner cap

    (per week)

    Non-pensioner

    Non-pensioner cap

    (per week)

    Visit $5.00 $10.00 $20.00 $30.00

    Social Support services assist people to participate in community life helping people to engage in their communities.

    Service Basis Pensioner

    Pensioner cap

    (per week)

    Non-pensioner

    Non-pensioner cap

    (per week)

    Individual/ Flexible Respite Visit $5.00 $10.00 $20.00 $30.00

    Group/Centre-based Respite session prices are determined by service and activity provided.

    Transport services help you with shopping and keeping appointments and may include travel for social activities and visiting friends. 

    Trip prices are determined by service and distance travelled.

    What if I can’t afford my care?

    If you’re worried that you may not be able to afford your care costs, you can ask to be considered for financial hardship assistance.

    • If you are eligible, the Australian Government will pay some or all your aged care costs.
    • If you are receiving care through another aged care program, please speak to your provider.
    • You can learn more about financial hardship assistance by visiting the My Aged Care website.

    How to get financial advice

    Last updated

    Our Community Dementia Service provide:

    • consultation, assessment, information and nursing care services to people with dementia.
    • education and support for families, carers and other healthcare providers.

    We aim to provide quality care, valuing the worth of every person. We work closely with the person with dementia, their families, carers and other health care providers.

    The Community Dementia Service operates from 7:30 am to 9:30 pm, seven days a week.

    We accept referrals from:

    • family members
    • care providers
    • doctors
    • hospitals
    • service providers
    • self-referrals.

    Service costs

    Person

    One Visit per Week 

    Two or more visits per week (capped) 

    Pensioner

    $5.00

    $10.00

    Non-pensioner

    $20.00

    $30.00

    Referrals to us

    Referrals can be made by:

    Ageing and aged care publications

    We aim to provide documents in an accessible format. If you are having problems using a document with your accessibility tools, please contact us for help.

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    Major hospitals

    Address

    48 Liverpool Street
    Hobart TAS 7000

    Postal address

    GPO Box 1061
    Hobart TAS 7001

    Contact us

    Phone: 03 6166 8308

    Emergencies: 000

    Information about Royal Hobart Hospital

    Information for visitors

    COVID-19 visitor restrictions

    • The safety of you and all patients, visitors and staff is very important.
    • Restrictions means limiting the number of people in the hospital.
    • This will help prevent any spread of coronavirus (COVID-19).

    All visitors need to be fully vaccinated. Exemptions are available on compassionate grounds. Please contact the hospital for further information.

    Please do not visit the hospital, outpatient clinic or community centres if you or anyone you live with:

    • has a cold, diarrhoea, vomiting or any infectious condition
    • is unwell
    • has a fever, cough, sore throat, runny nose or shortness of breath
    • has lost their sense of taste or smell
    • has been diagnosed with COVID-19 and is in isolation
    • is awaiting a COVID-19 test result and is in isolation
    • is a close contact, and is not permitted to enter or remain on the premises of a high-risk facility

    You may also be asked to leave while clinical and personal care procedures are being carried out.

    For patient admission information, visit the For Patients section on our website.

    For more information, go to Coronavirus.tas.gov.au.

    Visitor changes due to COVID-19

    To help prevent the spread of COVID-19 and protect you, our patients and our staff, we are limiting the number of visitors to our facilities.

    Visitor restrictions

    Until further notice, we ask that patients and visitors follow visiting restrictions and social distancing rules, including:

    • 1 visitor per patient at a time.
    • Visitors must not stay for longer than 30 minutes.
    • Visiting hours are 2:00 pm to 6:00 pm.
    • Requests for exceptions to these guidelines can be discussed with the in-charge ward nurse. 
    • Approved visitors will be screened before they are allowed in the hospital. 

    If you are an approved visitor, you must:

    • Wear a mask at all times while in the Hospital.
    • Wash your hands upon entry and exit of each ward or service areas.
    • Not share food.

    We recommend children do not visit patients unless the patient is critically unwell.

    Visiting hours

    You may visit a patient between 2 pm and 6 pm daily.

    Number of visitors

    • You may be accompanied by a caregiver or support person if required however if you are independent and attending an appointment, it is recommended that the person bringing you does not attend the facility unless required.
    • One person only may visit a patient at any one time.
    • Exceptions are listed below for certain wards and parts of the hospital.

    Area of hospital

    Number of visitors

    Department of Critical Care Medicine
    (specialist care of patients whose conditions are life-threatening)
    • One visitor at a time (Exemptions for increase in visitors if the patient needs end-of-life support or is critically unwell)
    Emergency Department
    (part of hospital for people who have an accident or need immediate treatment)
    • One parent or guardian if the patient is a child
    • One support person if the patient needs help to move, talk or understand information
    • Exemptions for increase in visitors if the patient needs end-of-life support or is critically unwell
    Neonatal Intensive Care Unit
    (specialist staff and equipment to care for premature and sick newborn babies)
    • One parent or guardians at any time
    • Siblings with approval if the baby is critically unwell
    Paediatric Unit
    (specialist medical care for children)
    • One parent or carer at any time
    Maternity Unit
    (specialist care for women and babies during pregnancy and childbirth)
    • Mother's partner (if they are present).
    Operating Theatre and Recovery Room
    (rooms where surgeries happen and where patients go immediately after)
    • No visitors
    • Parents or guardians may visit children post-surgery
    Short Stay Surgical Unit
    (For Planned Surgery And Medical Procedures Where Patient Needs To Stay For Up To 72 Hours)
    • One visitor at a time
    Palliative Care
    (specialist care for a patient who is terminally ill. This means they will pass away soon.)
    • Four visitors for patients receiving end-of-life care
    • Overnight visits approved on case by case basis
    • Pets may visit (if appropriate)

    Rules for visiting a patient

    COVID-19 visitor restrictions

    All visitors need to be fully vaccinated. Exemptions are available on compassionate grounds. Please contact the hospital for further information.

    • Always wear a fresh surgical facemask if you are 12 or older.
    • Complete the visitor screening tool on arrival.
    • Wash your hands.
    • Maintain a safe social distance from others.
    • Cover your cough or sneeze and then wash and dry your hands.

    Patient information shared with visitors

    • Details of your illness is confidential. This means it is private.
    • We will not share your personal information without you telling us it is OK. This is called giving consent.
    • We may provide information to the person you tell us is your next-of-kin on your admission form.
    • Next-of-kin may be your spouse, de facto partner, children or a blood relative like grandparent or sibling.

    Other ways to keep in touch with a patient

    • We understand that this is a very challenging time for everyone.
    • You can use other ways to keep in touch like phone or text.
    • You may ask the Nurse Unit Manager about a ‘compassionate exemption’ if the patient is critically unwell.
    • This means we may allow you to visit under special rules.

    How to call to ask about a patient

    • You may call to ask about a patient between 9 am to 5 pm.
    • Outside these hours, please try to not call unless it is for an urgent reason.
    • The hospital phone number is 03 6166 8308.
    • Please ask for the ward that the patient is in.
    • To help our staff, please provide the name of one family member to be the main contact for information.

    Supporting children as in-patients

    • It is important to spend lots of time with your child in hospital.
    • You can help your child by assisting the hospital team if they ask.
    • Sometimes nurses may need to limit part of your visit during treatment. Thank you for helping us.

     

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    You may drop off and pick-up patients at Royal Hobart Hospital and the Wellington Clinics.

    Where to access the hospital

    • There are two entrances to the Royal Hobart Hospital and the Wellington Clinics
    • Their location and opening hours are below.
    • Some areas may be closed at times for construction work.
    Components

    24 hours a day, seven days per week

    6:30am and 6.00pm

    Entrance map

    Parking

    Download an entrance map for Royal Hobart Hospital
    Download an entrance map for Wellington Clinics

    Where to park

    • There is plenty of parking near the hospital.
    • Parking information can change.
    • It is important to check the Hobart City Council website before parking.
    • The council may issue you a ticket and fine if you do not park correctly.
    • We cannot pay for any parking fines. These are your responsibility.

    Location
    38 Argyle Street

    Opening hours
    7:00am to 10:00pm
    7 days a week

    Location
    58 Collins Street

    Opening hours
    24 hours a day
    7 days a week

    Corner of Argyle and Bathurst Street

    Location
    Street parking is available a short walk from the hospital in Campbell, Collins, Argyle and Liverpool Streets

    Opening hours
    24 hours a day
    7 days a week

    • for people with disabilities
    • for patient drop off/ pick up

    Location
    Outside the hospital entrances:

    • Liverpool Street
    • Argyle Street
    • Campbell Street K Block

    Opening hours
    Limited

    Where to catch public transport

    How to make your way around the hospital

    Thumbnail image of the Royal Hobart Hospital – Main Campus Directory document

     

    G    WP Holman Clinic

    1     Oncology and Haematology Clinics, Cancer Support Centre

    2     Medical Specialties

    3     General Medicine, RHH Volunteers

    4     Short Stay Endoscopy

    5     Acute Older Person Unit

    6    Trauma and Acute Surgical Unit

    7     Medical Specialties, including Stroke Unit

    8     Day Chemotherapy Unit, Acute Nephrology (Renal Unit)

    9     Oncology Inpatients Unit

      G      Integrated Operations Centre

      1      Aboriginal Health Liaison, Chapel, Pathology Laboratories, Consumer Liaison Unit (Complaints and Feedback)

      2      Ambulatory Care Centre, Cardiothoracic/Cardiology Clinics

      3     Neurology and Neurophysiology Clinics

      4     Theatre Reception, Short Stay Suite

      5     Pharmacy

        G    Hospital Cafeteria

        2     Cardiothoracic and Cardiology Units

        3     Paediatric Outpatient Clinics, Jack Jumper Allergy Clinic

        2     Clozapine Clinic

        G     Grief Counsellor, Clinical Library, Keith Millingen Lecture Theatre

        LG    Argyle entry closed. Emergency Medical Unit (EMU)

        G      Medical Imaging, Nuclear Medicine

        1       Intensive Care Unit

        2       Physiotherapy. Access to Wellington Clinics via airbridge

        LG    Emergency Department

        G      RHH Central Auxiliary Kiosk

        3      Mental Health Short Stay Unit

        G     Reception, Patient Admissions, Patient Travel Assistance Scheme (PTAS), Transit Lounge, Automatic Teller Machine (ATM), Baby Feeding Room, Pounds and Ounces, Green Panda

        2     Inpatient Mental Health Services (K-2W), Allied Health Therapy, Staff Lounge

        3     Inpatient Mental Health Services (K-3W), Diving & Hyperbaric Medicine (K-3E)

        4     Operating Theatres, Short Stay (K-4W)

        5     Central Sterilising Department

        6     Adolescents Ward (K-6W), Transition to Home (K-6W), Children’s Ward (K-6E)

        7     Queen Alexandra Maternity Unit

        8     Neurosurgery (K-8W), Neonatal and Paediatric Intensive Care Unit (NPICU) (K-8E), Special Care Nursery (K-8E)

        9     General and Vascular Surgery (K-9W), Orthopaedic & Surgical Specialties (inc. Burns) (K-9E)

        10   General & Respiratory Medicine (K-10W), Rapid Assessment Medical Unit (RAMU) (K-10E)

        1     Outpatient Pharmacy, Accounts/Cashier

        2     Pathology South

        3     Access to hospital via airbridge, Entry/exit to from Level 3 of car park

        8     Women’s Clinics

        9     Specialist Clinics (Adult), Preadmission Clinic, Hand Physiotherapy, Staff Health

        10   Specialist Clinics (Adult), Respiratory Function Unit, Cardiology Clinics, Pacemaker Clinic, Holter Monitoring, Refugee Health Services

        11    Dental Clinics, Ear Nose & Throat Clinic, Oral & Maxillofacial, Audiology, Eye Clinic

        12    Orthopaedic Clinic, Burns Clinic

        5     Diabetes Centre, Persistent Pain Service, Tasmanian Adult Cystic Fibrosis Service

        TasEquip

        Peacock Garden

          LG   Whittle Unit

          G    Community Rehabilitation Unit

          1     Peacock 1

          2     Peacock 2 - Acute Rehabilitation Unit

          3     Peacock 3

            Community Palliative Care

            Lower Aged and Rehab Clinics

            Upper Hobart Community Nursing Service

            Orthotic Prosthetic Services Tasmania (OPST)

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            Learn about all the facilities and services available for patients and visitors at the hospital.

            Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander services

            • An Aboriginal Health Liaison Officer (AHLO) is available at the hospital.
            • They can help you and your family if you are an Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander patient.
            • They provide emotional, social and cultural support.
            • They also help you with discharge planning, accessing other services and follow-up care.

            How to contact the AHLO

            • The AHLO is available Monday to Friday.
            • Speak to your nurse.
            • Phone: 03 6166 8264

            Other services the AHLO provide

            • They help improve healthcare services and relationships within the Aboriginal community.
            • They work with Aboriginal organisations, other service providers and government departments.
            • They educate hospital staff about Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander culture.

            Read more about AHLOs

            Multicultural health services

            • A Multicultural Health Liaison Officer (MHLO) is available at the hospital.
            • They can help you and your family if you are a refugee, international student or migrant.
            • They provide emotional and practical support.
            • This includes helping you access culturally safe healthcare services and information.
            • The MHLO service is confidential. This means your information is kept private.
            • Our MHLO also trains our staff on ‘culturally safe’ practices for a wide variety of cultures.

            Help if you don't speak English

            • We have a person available to help you understand health information if you don’t speak English.
            • This person is called an ‘interpreter’.
            • This service is free.

            How to contact the MHLO

            Chaplaincy services

            • Our chaplaincy service provides compassionate emotional and spiritual support.
            • This support is available to you and your family and visitors.
            • We are available 24 hours a day.
            • Chaplains are assigned to wards/units and visit patients where appropriate
            • We can arrange a specific religious faith or denomination representative/clergy to visit you.
            • Please phone the chaplaincy service on 03 6166 8487 to arrange this.
            • If you are phone outside office hours and need urgent spiritual assistance please phone the chaplaincy service switchboard on 03 6166 8308.

            Hospital chapel and services

            • The chapel is located on the first floor of C Block.
            • It is open 24 hours a day for your quiet prayers and reflections.
            • Notifications of services are made over the public address system.

            Service type

            Time

            Morning prayer services Weekday mornings
            Weekly chapel services Sundays at 11am
            Catholic mass Wednesdays at 5pm
            Saturdays at 5pm
            Sundays at 4.30pm
            First Friday of each month at 5pm

            ATM facilities

            Onsite ATM is located on the ground floor near main reception in K Block.

            Dining room

            • Visitors may purchase meals in the hospital dining room between 7:00 am and 7:00 pm.
            • The dining room is located on the ground floor in D Block.

            Meals and dietary requirements

            • As a patient, you will be provided with a choice of meals and menu plans.
            • Menu plans are delivered with breakfast and collected between 9:30 am and 12:00-midday.
            • You may be prescribed a special diet as part of your treatment.
            • If you are on a special diet at home or have a food allergy, please tell the nursing staff.
            • A hot beverage is served at mealtimes.

            Meal type

            Time

            Breakfast 7:00am to 8:00am
            Morning Tea 10:00am
            Lunch 12:00-midday to 1:00pm
            Afternoon Tea 3:00pm
            Evening Meal 5:00pm to 6:00pm
            Supper 7:00pm

             

            Kiosk services

            • The Central Auxiliary Kiosk and Coffee Shop is open every day.
            • It is located in the forecourt, outside Liverpool Street entrance.
            • It serves hot food, sandwiches, fruit, cakes, hot and cold drinks.
            • You can also buy gifts, flowers and balloons.
            • The kiosk also operates a trolley service to wards (Monday to Friday)
            • The trolley service sells newspapers, magazines, fruit, drinks and personal items.
            • All profits go towards buying special equipment for the RHH.

            Hours of opening

            • Monday – Friday: 8.30 am to 6.30 pm.
            • Saturday, Sunday and Public Holidays: 11.00 am to 6.30 pm.

            Laundry

            • The hospital is unable to do any laundry for your personal clothing.
            • We can supply pyjamas or gowns if you come in as an emergency patient.

            Library service

            • A mobile library service visits the hospital wards every week.
            • This service is provided by our volunteers.

            Internet access, TVs and electronics

            • There is no public internet access available within the hospital.
            • Overhead televisions are available for hire. Please ask when you come to hospital.
            • Please avoid bringing your own electronic device.
            • You may use your own handheld device (like a tablet) if you are staying in hospital for.
            • Our staff will talk to you about our safety policy for handheld devices.
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            Download the visitor handbook

            You can download our handbook for more information on visiting Royal Hobart Hospital.

            View the handbook

            Last updated

            You may drop off and pick-up patients at Royal Hobart Hospital and the Wellington Clinics.

            Where to access the hospital

            • There are two entrances to the Royal Hobart Hospital and the Wellington Clinics
            • Their location and opening hours are below.
            • Some areas may be closed at times for construction work.

            24 hours a day, seven days per week

            6:30am and 6.00pm

            Entrance map

            Parking

            Download an entrance map for Royal Hobart Hospital
            Download an entrance map for Wellington Clinics

            Where to park

            • There is plenty of parking near the hospital.
            • Parking information can change.
            • It is important to check the Hobart City Council website before parking.
            • The council may issue you a ticket and fine if you do not park correctly.
            • We cannot pay for any parking fines. These are your responsibility.

            Location
            38 Argyle Street

            Opening hours
            7:00am to 10:00pm
            7 days a week

            Location
            58 Collins Street

            Opening hours
            24 hours a day
            7 days a week

            Corner of Argyle and Bathurst Street

            Location
            Street parking is available a short walk from the hospital in Campbell, Collins, Argyle and Liverpool Streets

            Opening hours
            24 hours a day
            7 days a week

            • for people with disabilities
            • for patient drop off/ pick up

            Location
            Outside the hospital entrances:

            • Liverpool Street
            • Argyle Street
            • Campbell Street K Block

            Opening hours
            Limited

            Where to catch public transport

            How to make your way around the hospital

            Thumbnail image of the Royal Hobart Hospital – Main Campus Directory document

             

            G    WP Holman Clinic

            1     Oncology and Haematology Clinics, Cancer Support Centre

            2     Medical Specialties

            3     General Medicine, RHH Volunteers

            4     Short Stay Endoscopy

            5     Acute Older Person Unit

            6    Trauma and Acute Surgical Unit

            7     Medical Specialties, including Stroke Unit

            8     Day Chemotherapy Unit, Acute Nephrology (Renal Unit)

            9     Oncology Inpatients Unit

              G      Integrated Operations Centre

              1      Aboriginal Health Liaison, Chapel, Pathology Laboratories, Consumer Liaison Unit (Complaints and Feedback)

              2      Ambulatory Care Centre, Cardiothoracic/Cardiology Clinics

              3     Neurology and Neurophysiology Clinics

              4     Theatre Reception, Short Stay Suite

              5     Pharmacy

                G    Hospital Cafeteria

                2     Cardiothoracic and Cardiology Units

                3     Paediatric Outpatient Clinics, Jack Jumper Allergy Clinic

                2     Clozapine Clinic

                G     Grief Counsellor, Clinical Library, Keith Millingen Lecture Theatre

                LG    Argyle entry closed. Emergency Medical Unit (EMU)

                G      Medical Imaging, Nuclear Medicine

                1       Intensive Care Unit

                2       Physiotherapy. Access to Wellington Clinics via airbridge

                LG    Emergency Department

                G      RHH Central Auxiliary Kiosk

                3      Mental Health Short Stay Unit

                G     Reception, Patient Admissions, Patient Travel Assistance Scheme (PTAS), Transit Lounge, Automatic Teller Machine (ATM), Baby Feeding Room, Pounds and Ounces, Green Panda

                2     Inpatient Mental Health Services (K-2W), Allied Health Therapy, Staff Lounge

                3     Inpatient Mental Health Services (K-3W), Diving & Hyperbaric Medicine (K-3E)

                4     Operating Theatres, Short Stay (K-4W)

                5     Central Sterilising Department

                6     Adolescents Ward (K-6W), Transition to Home (K-6W), Children’s Ward (K-6E)

                7     Queen Alexandra Maternity Unit

                8     Neurosurgery (K-8W), Neonatal and Paediatric Intensive Care Unit (NPICU) (K-8E), Special Care Nursery (K-8E)

                9     General and Vascular Surgery (K-9W), Orthopaedic & Surgical Specialties (inc. Burns) (K-9E)

                10   General & Respiratory Medicine (K-10W), Rapid Assessment Medical Unit (RAMU) (K-10E)

                1     Outpatient Pharmacy, Accounts/Cashier

                2     Pathology South

                3     Access to hospital via airbridge, Entry/exit to from Level 3 of car park

                8     Women’s Clinics

                9     Specialist Clinics (Adult), Preadmission Clinic, Hand Physiotherapy, Staff Health

                10   Specialist Clinics (Adult), Respiratory Function Unit, Cardiology Clinics, Pacemaker Clinic, Holter Monitoring, Refugee Health Services

                11    Dental Clinics, Ear Nose & Throat Clinic, Oral & Maxillofacial, Audiology, Eye Clinic

                12    Orthopaedic Clinic, Burns Clinic

                5     Diabetes Centre, Persistent Pain Service, Tasmanian Adult Cystic Fibrosis Service

                TasEquip

                Peacock Garden

                  LG   Whittle Unit

                  G    Community Rehabilitation Unit

                  1     Peacock 1

                  2     Peacock 2 - Acute Rehabilitation Unit

                  3     Peacock 3

                    Community Palliative Care

                    Lower Aged and Rehab Clinics

                    Upper Hobart Community Nursing Service

                    Orthotic Prosthetic Services Tasmania (OPST)

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                    Learn about all the facilities and services available for patients and visitors at the hospital.

                    Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander services

                    • An Aboriginal Health Liaison Officer (AHLO) is available at the hospital.
                    • They can help you and your family if you are an Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander patient.
                    • They provide emotional, social and cultural support.
                    • They also help you with discharge planning, accessing other services and follow-up care.

                    How to contact the AHLO

                    • The AHLO is available Monday to Friday.
                    • Speak to your nurse.
                    • Phone: 03 6166 8264

                    Other services the AHLO provide

                    • They help improve healthcare services and relationships within the Aboriginal community.
                    • They work with Aboriginal organisations, other service providers and government departments.
                    • They educate hospital staff about Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander culture.

                    Read more about AHLOs

                    Multicultural health services

                    • A Multicultural Health Liaison Officer (MHLO) is available at the hospital.
                    • They can help you and your family if you are a refugee, international student or migrant.
                    • They provide emotional and practical support.
                    • This includes helping you access culturally safe healthcare services and information.
                    • The MHLO service is confidential. This means your information is kept private.
                    • Our MHLO also trains our staff on ‘culturally safe’ practices for a wide variety of cultures.

                    Help if you don't speak English

                    • We have a person available to help you understand health information if you don’t speak English.
                    • This person is called an ‘interpreter’.
                    • This service is free.

                    How to contact the MHLO

                    Chaplaincy services

                    • Our chaplaincy service provides compassionate emotional and spiritual support.
                    • This support is available to you and your family and visitors.
                    • We are available 24 hours a day.
                    • Chaplains are assigned to wards/units and visit patients where appropriate
                    • We can arrange a specific religious faith or denomination representative/clergy to visit you.
                    • Please phone the chaplaincy service on 03 6166 8487 to arrange this.
                    • If you are phone outside office hours and need urgent spiritual assistance please phone the chaplaincy service switchboard on 03 6166 8308.

                    Hospital chapel and services

                    • The chapel is located on the first floor of C Block.
                    • It is open 24 hours a day for your quiet prayers and reflections.
                    • Notifications of services are made over the public address system.

                    Service type

                    Time

                    Morning prayer services Weekday mornings
                    Weekly chapel services Sundays at 11am
                    Catholic mass Wednesdays at 5pm
                    Saturdays at 5pm
                    Sundays at 4.30pm
                    First Friday of each month at 5pm

                    ATM facilities

                    Onsite ATM is located on the ground floor near main reception in K Block.

                    Dining room

                    • Visitors may purchase meals in the hospital dining room between 7:00 am and 7:00 pm.
                    • The dining room is located on the ground floor in D Block.

                    Meals and dietary requirements

                    • As a patient, you will be provided with a choice of meals and menu plans.
                    • Menu plans are delivered with breakfast and collected between 9:30 am and 12:00-midday.
                    • You may be prescribed a special diet as part of your treatment.
                    • If you are on a special diet at home or have a food allergy, please tell the nursing staff.
                    • A hot beverage is served at mealtimes.

                    Meal type

                    Time

                    Breakfast 7:00am to 8:00am
                    Morning Tea 10:00am
                    Lunch 12:00-midday to 1:00pm
                    Afternoon Tea 3:00pm
                    Evening Meal 5:00pm to 6:00pm
                    Supper 7:00pm

                     

                    Kiosk services

                    • The Central Auxiliary Kiosk and Coffee Shop is open every day.
                    • It is located in the forecourt, outside Liverpool Street entrance.
                    • It serves hot food, sandwiches, fruit, cakes, hot and cold drinks.
                    • You can also buy gifts, flowers and balloons.
                    • The kiosk also operates a trolley service to wards (Monday to Friday)
                    • The trolley service sells newspapers, magazines, fruit, drinks and personal items.
                    • All profits go towards buying special equipment for the RHH.

                    Hours of opening

                    • Monday – Friday: 8.30 am to 6.30 pm.
                    • Saturday, Sunday and Public Holidays: 11.00 am to 6.30 pm.

                    Laundry

                    • The hospital is unable to do any laundry for your personal clothing.
                    • We can supply pyjamas or gowns if you come in as an emergency patient.

                    Library service

                    • A mobile library service visits the hospital wards every week.
                    • This service is provided by our volunteers.

                    Internet access, TVs and electronics

                    • There is no public internet access available within the hospital.
                    • Overhead televisions are available for hire. Please ask when you come to hospital.
                    • Please avoid bringing your own electronic device.
                    • You may use your own handheld device (like a tablet) if you are staying in hospital for.
                    • Our staff will talk to you about our safety policy for handheld devices.
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                    At the Royal Hobart Hospital, we provide you with many treatments and services including:

                    • medical care if you are in hospital
                    • services to help you when you leave the hospital
                    • emergency care in our Emergency Department
                    • care at specialist clinics if your doctor provides a referral letter.

                    Our services

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                    We acknowledge and respect Tasmanian Aboriginal people as the traditional owners and ongoing custodians of the land on which we work and live, and pay respect to Elders past, present and emerging.

                    About us

                    • The Royal Hobart Hospital is Tasmania’s largest hospital and the major referral centre.
                    • We provide acute, sub-acute, mental health and aged care inpatient and ambulatory services.
                    • We support around 250,000 Tasmanians in the southern region.
                    • We are a major clinical teaching and research site for The University of Tasmania and other institutions.
                    • We have been helping Tasmanians from our current site for over 200 years.
                    • We employ around 3,000 people.
                    • View our current hospital statistics.

                    Types of services

                    We provide a comprehensive range of general, specialty medical and surgical services. These include:

                    • 24-hour, seven-day-a-week Emergency Department
                    • 24-hour, seven-day-a-week critical care Intensive Care Unit (including cardiothoracic intensive care),
                    • High Dependency Unit
                    • cardiac surgery
                    • neurosurgery
                    • extensive burns treatment
                    • hyperbaric medicine
                    • neonatal and paediatric intensive care
                    • high-risk obstetrics.

                    Donations, gifts and bequests

                    • We appreciate the generosity of Tasmanians, small businesses and large corporations.
                    • Each year we are well-supported by fundraising to purchase medical equipment.
                    • If you would like to make a donation, gift or bequest, please contact our Community Relations Unit.

                    Read more about Royal Hobart Hospital

                    “Outstanding care with compassion every time”

                    Our values

                    • We are caring
                    • We are respectful
                    • We are compassionate
                    • We are person and family centred

                    Our goals 2020 - 2021

                    • Improved consumer experience and health outcomes
                      Safe, compassionate, evidenced-based care, centred on the needs of consumers and provided in partnership with them.
                    • Connected and coordinated services
                      Right care, right place, right time, with seamless, timely and smooth connections for people moving between care settings
                    • Efficient and sustainable services
                      Evidence-based health care and services provided in the most appropriate setting to deliver the best consumer outcomes and value to the Tasmanian community
                    • Strong partnerships with consumers and the community
                      Informed and empowered consumers and community, actively participating in health service planning, design, delivery, evaluation and improvement
                    • Improved health and wellbeing
                      Informed, involved consumers, supported to self-manage and be partners in improving their health outcomes
                    • A great place to work
                      Attract and retain high quality staff who are valued and support to excel.
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                    Our history

                    Watch: Our history through Tasmanian Museum and Art Gallery images

                    • 1811
                      Lachlan Macquarie ordered construction of the first purpose-built hospital for Hobart.
                    • 1820
                      The two-storey ‘new general hospital’ opened with four wards and 56 beds.
                    • 1880s
                      The ‘convict hospital’ redeveloped with new buildings and clean wards.
                    • 1910
                      The children's block opened, and the number of beds reached 175.
                    • 1925
                      The number of beds grew to 250 beds by 1925.
                    • 1935
                      Premier Albert Ogilvie spent 10 days in the hospital.
                      He then persuaded the government to develop a more modern building.
                    • Late-1930s
                      The original sandstone buildings were demolished.
                      A new acute building (C Block) of 304 beds was built.
                      Royal Hobart Hospital became one of the most up-to-date hospitals in Australia.
                    • 1937
                      The hospital received a ‘Royal’ title, coat of arms and Latin motto.
                      The motto means 'To Care with Compassion'.
                    • Post-war decades
                      Further building work occurred.
                      The hospital became an undergraduate teaching hospital.
                      The hospital also gained postgraduate recognition.
                    • 1970
                      The North East Building (A Block) was opened by HRH Queen Elizabeth II.
                    • 1995-1999
                      Almost 80 per cent of the hospital was upgraded.
                      This was to support the teaching centre.
                    • 1999
                      Hobart Private Hospital moved to the Royal Hobart Hospital in the Queen Alexandra Wing.
                    • 2007
                      The $15.4 million Emergency Department opened in March.
                      It comprises Tasmania’s first combined neonatal and paediatric intensive care unit.
                      It also has a pain management clinic, two operating theatres and recovery rooms and other support areas.
                    Introduction

                    Learn all about the history and milestones of the Royal Hobart Hospital in Tasmania.

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                    • The Royal Hobart Hospital (RHH) Volunteer Service started in February 1967.
                    • It began after people in the community offered help during the tragic ‘Black Tuesday’ bushfires.
                    • It is a valued and respected community service supporting patients, families and staff.
                    • Over 110 volunteers deliver 30 individual services to help the hospital.
                    • Many people choose to volunteer to help others.
                    • Some people choose to volunteer after a personal experience at the hospital.

                    Types of volunteer roles

                    • Pharmacy Courier Service
                      Delivering medications and prescriptions to patients and staff across the hospital.
                    • Hospital Guide
                      Helping people find their way around the hospital.
                    • Refreshment Service
                      Offering snacks and support to people waiting to attend appointments.
                    • Emergency Department Support
                      Helping people when they arrive in the emergency department.

                    How to become a volunteer

                    We run a training program to help you learn about the different roles.

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                    • Delivering safe and compassionate care is important to us.
                    • We work together with our staff and the community to continuously improve our service.

                    How we work to improve our service

                    There are many ways we strive to improve our service and care for patients. These include:

                    • participating in accreditation processes of the Australian Council on Healthcare Standards
                    • connecting with the community
                    • listening to your recommendations and suggestions
                    • measuring the care that we provide
                    • comparing this information to other like hospitals around Australia
                    • learning from when things do go wrong and making changes
                    • making sure that all our staff have the skills and qualifications needed to perform their job
                    • regularly reviewing staff qualifications
                    • having appropriate processes for appointing staff and developing their skills
                    • actively participating in research to provide the most up-to-date care available
                    • supporting ongoing learning for our staff.

                    Our rights and responsibilities

                    The Australian government endorse the Australian Charter of Healthcare Rights as the benchmark for healthcare standards in Australia. This means holding healthcare to the highest standards in Australia.

                    We support the promotion and use of this important charter through:

                    • the prominent display of the charter across the hospital
                    • ensuring our own complaint and feedback protocols align with the charter
                    • ensuring our rights and responsibilities documents align with the charter
                    • using the same healthcare terminology (words and definitions) in our patient information and brochures.

                    Learn more at the Australian Commission on Safety and Quality in Healthcare

                    Learn about your rights and responsibilities as a patient

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                    Last updated

                    The main contact details for the Royal Hobart Hospital are listed below.

                    Emergency/After Hours:

                    For emergency medical treatment phone 000

                    Hospital switchboard:

                    03 6166 8308

                    Mailing Address:

                    Royal Hobart Hospital
                    48 Liverpool Street
                    Hobart, TAS 7000   

                    Postal Address:

                    GPO Box 1061
                    Hobart, TAS 7001   

                    Email:

                    To send us an email please complete the online Contact Us form
                    (select 'Hospital - Royal Hobart' in the subject field).

                    General feedback

                    Department feedback

                    Auxiliary Liaison 03 6166 8846
                    Donations/Bequests 03 6166 8846
                    Media requests David Bauche
                    03 6166 8037
                    [email protected]
                    Outpatients Clinics www.outpatients.tas.gov.au
                    Patient Travel Assistance Scheme 03 6166 8225
                    Visits/Events and Public Relations 03 6166 8846
                    Volunteer Service Coordinator 03 6166 8270
                    Wellington Clinic 03 6166 0000

                    Compliments, suggestions and complaints

                    • We appreciate your feedback on services and care we have provided.
                    • You can make a suggestion, say thank you to staff, or make a complaint.
                    • You can write a letter, send an email or complete a feedback form.
                    • You can ask for a feedback form in the ward.
                    • If you have concerns or a complaint, we encourage you to discuss these with staff.
                    • You can also phone our Quality and Patient Safety Service Consumer Liaison Unit on 1800 811 911.
                    • We review all complaints.
                    • If you make a complaint, we will carry out a full investigation.
                    Thumbnail
                    Image of the outside of the Royal Hobart Hospital Campbell St entrance.
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                    Address

                    274-280 Charles Street
                    Launceston, 7250

                    Postal address

                    PO Box 1963
                    Launceston, 7250

                    Contact us

                    Phone: 03 6777 6777

                    Emergencies: 000

                    Information for visitors

                    COVID-19 visitor restrictions

                    Until further notice, we ask that patients and visitors follow visiting restrictions and social distancing rules, including:

                    • 1 visitor per patient at a time.
                    • Visitors must not stay for longer than 30 minutes.
                    • Visiting hours are 2:00 pm to 6:00 pm.
                    • Requests for exceptions to these guidelines can be discussed with the in-charge ward nurse.
                    • Approved visitors will be screened before they are allowed in the hospital.

                    If you are an approved visitor, you must:

                    • Wear a mask at all times while in the Hospital.
                    • Wash your hands upon entry and exit of each ward or service areas.
                    • No food or drink to be consumed by visitors at patient bedside.

                    We recommend children do not visit patients unless the patient is critically unwell.

                    Please do not visit the hospital, specialists clinic or other services if you or anyone you live with:

                    • has a cold, diarrhoea, vomiting or any infectious condition
                    • is unwell
                    • has a fever, cough, sore throat, runny nose or shortness of breath
                    • has lost their sense of taste or smell
                    • has been diagnosed with COVID-19 and is in isolation
                    • is awaiting a COVID-19 test result and is in isolation
                    • is a close contact and is not permitted to enter or remain on the premises of a high-risk facility.

                    You may also be asked to leave while clinical and personal care procedures are being carried out.

                    For patient admission information, visit the For Patients section on our website.

                    For more information, go to coronavirus.tas.gov.au

                    Visiting hours

                    • You may visit a patient between 2pm and 6pm daily
                    • Visiting hours and rest periods may be different in some wards
                    • Nursing staff may change these times as needed
                    • Patients can decide whether they wish to receive visitors
                    • Patients can ask us to exclude their details from the enquiry information database
                    • In some situations, we may stop you from visiting. This may be for medical, social or legal reasons
                    • Sometimes we may ask you to leave while treatment and care are happening.

                    Number of visitors

                    • You may be accompanied by a caregiver or support person if required however if you are independent and attending an appointment, it is recommended that the person bringing you does not attend the facility unless required.
                    • Only one visitor per patient for a maximum of 30 minutes per day.
                    • Exceptions are below.

                    Area of hospital

                    Number of visitors

                    Emergency Department
                    • One parent or guardian if the patient is a child
                    • One support person if the patient needs help to move, talk or understand information
                    • One visitor on compassionate grounds. This means in very special cases.  
                    Neonatal Intensive Care
                    • Two parents or guardians at any time
                    • Siblings with approval if the baby is critically unwell
                    Paediatric Unit
                    • Two parents or carers at any time
                    Maternity Ward
                    • One visitor at a time. Exemptions may be applied for siblings – one at a time.
                    Birth Suite
                    • An upper limit of two people to support mothers in the maternity unit (this limit of two includes the partner if the partner is present). 
                    Pregnancy & Gynaecology Outpatient Clinics
                    • It is recommended that if the patient attending the appointment is independent that the person bringing the patient to their appointment does not attend.
                    • A support person may attend if their presence is needed for interpreting, understanding or help with any legal or administrative requirements only
                    Operating Theatre and Recovery Room
                    • No visitors
                    • Parents or guardians may visit children post-surgery
                    Short Stay Surgical Unit
                    • One support person
                    Palliative Care
                    • Four visitors for patients receiving end-of-life care
                    • One visitor may stay overnight
                    • Pets may visit (if appropriate)
                    Specialists clinics and other services
                    • No visitors. One Support person only if needed.

                    Rules for visiting a patient

                    COVID-19 visitor restrictions

                    All visitors need to be fully vaccinated. Exemptions are available on compassionate grounds. Please contact the hospital for further information.

                    • Always wear a facemask if you are 12 or older
                    • Complete the visitor screening tool on arrival
                    • Wash your hands
                    • Maintain a safe social distance from others
                    • Cover your cough or sneeze and then wash and dry your hands
                    • Please be respectful to staff, other patients and other visitors
                    • If you act aggressively, we will not allow you to visit in the future

                    Other ways to keep in touch with a patient

                    • We understand that this is a very challenging time for everyone
                    • You can use other ways to keep in touch like phone or text
                    • The hospital phone number is 03 6777 6777
                    • Please ask for the ward that the patient is in
                    • You may call to ask about a patient between 9 am to 5 pm
                    • Outside these hours, please don’t call unless it is urgent
                    • To help our staff, please provide the name of one family member to be the main contact for information on your admission form

                    Type of information we share with your visitors

                    • Details of your illness are confidential. This means it is private.
                    • We will not share your personal information without you telling us it is OK. This is called giving consent.
                    • We may provide information to the person you tell us is your next-of-kin on your admission form.
                    • Next-of-kin may be your spouse, de facto partner, children or a blood relative like grandparent or sibling. 

                    Supporting children as in-patients

                    • It is important to spend lots of time with your child in hospital.
                    • You can help your child by assisting the hospital team if they ask.
                    • Sometimes nurse may need to limit part of your visit during treatment.
                    Introduction

                    Get information about visiting a patient at the Launceston General Hospital in Tasmania. This includes visiting hours and visitor restrictions.

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                    There is no long-term parking at the hospital. Please have a friend or relative bring you to the hospital if possible.

                    Parking at the hospital

                    • Cleveland Street Car Park – reserved for Allied Health Patients
                    • Viewpoint Car Park - Frankland Street
                    • Holman Clinic Car Park
                    • Howick Street Car Park
                    • Parking fees apply 24 hours
                    • Any vehicle left unattended may receive an infringement notice

                    Disabled parking access

                    Disabled parking spaces are available:

                    • near the Queen Victoria entrance
                    • in the Cleveland Street Car Park – reserved for Allied Health Patients
                    • In the Holman Clinic Car Park
                    • Near the main entrance on Charles Street
                    • Under the 4K extension in the Howick Street car park

                    Parking and entrance map

                    Launceston General Hospital Parking map. See page content for full image description, including parking locations.

                    Download the parking and entrance map for the Launceston General Hospital

                    On-street parking

                    Time-limited free on-street parking, is available near the hospital in Charles, Frankland and Howick streets.

                    • The council may issue you a ticket and fine if you do not park correctly.
                    • We cannot pay for any parking fines. These are your responsibility.

                    Other transport options

                    • There is a taxi rank outside the hospital’s main entrance on Charles Street.
                    • A metro bus stop is near the corner of Charles and Frankland Streets.
                    • A free city bus service known as the Tiger Bus also stops here.

                    Where to access the hospital

                    There are two drop off/pick up zones for patients:

                    • near the main entrance in Charles Street (near the Post Box)
                    • Queen Victoria Maternity entrance off Howick Street
                    • However, access to the hospital for visitors is limited to the main entrance during the declared COVID-19 emergency
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                    Learn about all the facilities and services available for patients and visitors at the hospital

                    Food Services Department

                    Caféteria

                    • Cafe on Frankland, located on level 2 and is open to staff, patients and visitors.
                    • Hot and cold meals are available for breakfast, lunch and dinner 7 days a week, 365 days a year
                    • Snacks and hot and cold beverages including barista-made coffee is available

                    Opening Hours

                    • Monday to Friday: 6:15 am to 6:45 pm
                    • Saturday and Sunday: 8:30 am to 4:00 pm and 5.00 pm to 6.45 pm
                    • Public Holidays: 8:30 am to 4:00 pm and 5:00 pm to 6:45 pm (minor changes to the range of items available).

                    Catering

                    • The Food Service Department can supply catering for events large and small. For further information or orders please contact us via [email protected] or phone 03 6777 6526.

                    COVID-19 changes

                    During the declared COVID-19 emergency due to social distancing requirements the Cafeteria is only open to hospital staff for dine-in meals. Patients and approved hospital visitors (in-line with the COVID-19 visitor restrictions) are able to access the cafeteria for takeaway only.

                    Meals and dietary requirements for patients

                    • As a patient, you will enjoy a choice of meals from the menu you are assigned.
                    • Your doctor, nurse, dietician or speech pathologist may choose a special diet as part of your treatment.
                    • You will receive your menu about 8:00 am daily to select your meals for the following day. It will be collected between 9:00 am and 11:00 am.
                    • If you have special dietary requirements including religious and cultural, food allergies or intolerances please tell your nurse or admissions staff.
                    • If you are in isolation, a nurse will deliver your meal.
                    Meal type Time
                    Water refill 6:30 am
                    Breakfast 8:00 am
                    Morning Tea 10:00 am to 10.15 am
                    Lunch 12:00 pm to 1:00 pm
                    Afternoon Tea 2:00 pm
                    Evening Meal 5:10 pm to 6:10 pm
                    Supper 7:15 pm to 7:30 pm

                    Kiosk

                    • The kiosk is on Level 3.
                    • The kiosk is run by volunteers.
                    • It is open between Monday to Friday from 11:00 am to 5.30 pm.
                    • It serves a variety of hot and cold food, drinks, sweets, and ice creams.
                    • It also sells toys, newspapers flowers, and toiletry items.
                    • EFTPOS is available for payment.
                    • The kiosk is run by volunteers.
                    • All profits go to buying hospital equipment and patient amenities.

                    Flowers

                    • Flowers are available from the kiosk.
                    • Please check with nursing staff or the ward clerk whether flowers are allowed on your ward. Flowers are not permitted in the Intensive Care Unit and Acute Medical Unit.

                    Radio/Television

                    Each bed has a personal overhead television. Radio access is also available. No outside televisions or radios can be used within the hospital.

                    Rental agreements can be made for a period of one day, one week, two weeks or longer and the charge is dependent on the term of the rental. Payment should be made to the ward clerk.

                    Public Telephones

                    Public telephones are in the hospital’s main foyer, outside of the Emergency Department and on Level 4. Phone cards can be bought at the kiosk.

                    Mobile Phones

                    • Mobile phone charge stations are available near the front reception on Charles Street, ICU waiting room, Emergency Department and cafeteria. 
                    • Mobile phones can be used within the hospital. As a courtesy you should switch your phone to silent. Taking photos of staff, other patients and visitors without permission is strictly prohibited.

                    ATM

                    • An ATM is on Level 3 near the Volunteer Office.

                    Religion and chaplaincy services

                    • Chaplains are always available 24 hours per day, 7 days a week.
                    • They provide spiritual and emotional care and pastoral support for patients, carers, staff and families.
                    • They are available to listen and support all people in challenging situations.
                    • They support people of all faiths and people who do not share a faith.
                    • We can arrange pastoral visitors from other denominations and faiths.
                    • We can help with baptisms, naming ceremonies, weddings, and funerals.
                    • You can ask for a chaplain by asking nursing staff or hospital reception.

                    St Paul’s Chapel

                    • St Paul’s Chapel is on Level 3.
                    • It is a quiet place in the hospital.
                    • It is open to everyone regardless of your faith.
                    • We have a service every Sunday at 3:00 pm.

                    Social workers

                    • Social workers provide counselling, support and practical help.
                    • They can help you and your family if you are dealing with illness, hospitalisation or disability.
                    • You can ask for a social worker by visiting the Allied Health Department on Level 2 or phoning 6777 6245.
                    • You can also ask the ward staff to organise a social worker for you.

                    How social workers can help you

                    Our social workers can help you and your family with:

                    • planning for your admission and discharge from hospital
                    • grief, loss and trauma
                    • adjusting to illness, treatment and rehabilitation
                    • family and relationship concerns
                    • support for your carers and family
                    • work, money and legal issues (such as Centrelink, DVA, MAIB, Workers' Compensation)
                    • information and options for aged care
                    • support for chronic illness
                    • helping you and your family with your rights
                    • cultural issues and needs
                    • talking through your worries and plans.

                    Aboriginal Health Liaison Officer

                    We have an Aboriginal Health Liaison Officer available at the hospital. They can help you:

                    • if you identify as Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander
                    • access hospital and health services
                    • connect with services and people who can help support your cultural and other needs.

                    How to find the Aboriginal Health Liaison Officer

                    • The office is on Level 2 near the cafeteria.
                    • You can also contact them via the Social Work department.
                    • Or you can ask the admission or ward staff to do this for you.

                    Read more about Aboriginal Health Liason Officers

                    PTAS office

                    You may be able to apply for financial help towards travel and accommodation costs. This is through the Patient Travel Assistance Scheme (PTAS). It is available to you if you:

                    • must travel outside of Tasmania for specialist medical services
                    • have to get specialist help away from home
                    • are receiving oncology or dialysis within Tasmania
                    • need to travel more than 50 kilometres in distance one way.

                    How to find out more about PTAS

                    Learn more about travel support for patients

                    Refugee Health Social Work Services

                    • The Refugee Health Social Worker (RHSW) provides ongoing support to our refugee arrived community, temporary visa holders, seasonal workers and can offer support to the migrant community.
                    • This support is offered individually, as a family group or at a community level and it can be short or long term.
                    • The RHSW will help you to access hospital and interpreter services as well as other health services in the community.
                    • The RHSW will provide information and help you to access other services you may be entitled to if you are living with a disability or caring for someone with a disability.
                    • The social worker can offer you or your family counselling support.
                    • You do not have to be a patient in the hospital for the social worker to support you. The social worker offers support to new arrivals as well as to those who have lived in Tasmania for a while.

                    How to find the Refugee Health Social Worker

                    • The office is in the Northern Integrated Care Service building in the refugee health office on the ground floor where you will have already met the nurse and the social worker.
                    • You are very welcome to walk into the building and ask for the social worker.
                    • You can also contact them via the Social Work department.  
                    • Or you can ask the admission or ward staff to do this for you.

                    Cancer Information and Support Centre

                    • If you or a family member has cancer, there is a free information and support service.
                    • This is provided by the Cancer Council Tasmania and Leukemia Foundation.
                    • Address: 69 Howick Street, Launceston
                    • Phone: 03 6779 1100
                    • Hours: Monday to Friday, 9:30 am to 4:30 pm

                    McGrath Breast Care Nurses

                    • The McGrath Breast Care Nurse provides support to people with breast cancer.
                    • This service is also available to help your family, friends and carers.
                    • This is a free service.
                    • You can ask for the McGrath Breast Care Nurse while you are in hospital.
                    • You can also refer yourself.

                    Learn about breast care nurses

                    Spurr Wing and Spurr Wing House

                    Spurr Wing and Spurr Wing House is a ‘home away from home’ for patients receiving treatment and their families.

                    Who can stay here?

                    This accommodation is available for:

                    • country patients receiving daily treatments
                    • country patients undergoing procedures who need somewhere to stay overnight.
                    • parents of children who are inpatients.
                    • country and interstate immediate family members of inpatients.

                    Location and size

                    It is at 268 and 270 Charles Street, Launceston. This is a one-minute walk from the hospital. It has:

                    • single rooms
                    • twin-share rooms
                    • a flat for families with children
                    • a unit for people with disabilities
                    • self-contained two-bedroom unit.

                    Costs and how to book  

                    • Phone: 03 6331 2457
                    • You can also contact them via the Social Work department.

                    Quiet Room and Prayer Room

                    • There is a quiet room on Level 2 near the cafeteria.
                    • This room is open 24 hours a day, 7 days a week.
                    • Staff and patients can use this room.
                    • Please be respectful of others when using this space.

                    Baby Change and Feeding Facilities

                    There is a baby change and feeding room available for visitors and staff on Level 2. It is on the corridor between the cafeteria and the pre-admission clinic. There are also baby change facilities on Level 3 (near the Renal Unit).

                    Public Toilets

                    There are public toilets available throughout the hospital. They are clearly marked. Visitors must not use patient toilets on wards.

                    Smoking

                    Smoking is prohibited in all buildings and on the grounds of the LGH. The Public Health Act imposes financial penalties for anyone who fails to follow the no smoking rules. 

                    Transit Lounge

                    • The Transit Lounge is on Level 2, near the set of four lifts and the same level as the cafeteria.
                    • It is a waiting area for patients being admitted to or discharged from hospital – like when you arrive early at a hotel and your room isn’t ready, or you must check out early and need somewhere to wait.
                    • If you are being discharged or transferred to another hospital and waiting on the ward for a script, someone to pick you up or paperwork you can wait in the Transit Lounge.
                    • If you are being admitted from Emergency or a clinic and your ward bed isn’t ready you can wait in the Lounge.
                    • The Transit Lounge is open Monday to Friday from 9:30 am until 6:00 pm.
                    Introduction

                    Discover facilities at Launceston General Hospital for patients and visitors. This includes indigenous and multicultural support, chaplaincy, food and internet.

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                    There is no long-term parking at the hospital. Please have a friend or relative bring you to the hospital if possible.

                    Parking at the hospital

                    • Cleveland Street Car Park – reserved for Allied Health Patients
                    • Viewpoint Car Park - Frankland Street
                    • Holman Clinic Car Park
                    • Howick Street Car Park
                    • Parking fees apply 24 hours
                    • Any vehicle left unattended may receive an infringement notice

                    Disabled parking access

                    Disabled parking spaces are available:

                    • near the Queen Victoria entrance
                    • in the Cleveland Street Car Park – reserved for Allied Health Patients
                    • In the Holman Clinic Car Park
                    • Near the main entrance on Charles Street
                    • Under the 4K extension in the Howick Street car park

                    Parking and entrance map

                    Launceston General Hospital Parking map. See page content for full image description, including parking locations.

                    Download the parking and entrance map for the Launceston General Hospital

                    On-street parking

                    Time-limited free on-street parking, is available near the hospital in Charles, Frankland and Howick streets.

                    • The council may issue you a ticket and fine if you do not park correctly.
                    • We cannot pay for any parking fines. These are your responsibility.

                    Other transport options

                    • There is a taxi rank outside the hospital’s main entrance on Charles Street.
                    • A metro bus stop is near the corner of Charles and Frankland Streets.
                    • A free city bus service known as the Tiger Bus also stops here.

                    Where to access the hospital

                    There are two drop off/pick up zones for patients:

                    • near the main entrance in Charles Street (near the Post Box)
                    • Queen Victoria Maternity entrance off Howick Street
                    • However, access to the hospital for visitors is limited to the main entrance during the declared COVID-19 emergency
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                    Learn about all the facilities and services available for patients and visitors at the hospital

                    Food Services Department

                    Caféteria

                    • Cafe on Frankland, located on level 2 and is open to staff, patients and visitors.
                    • Hot and cold meals are available for breakfast, lunch and dinner 7 days a week, 365 days a year
                    • Snacks and hot and cold beverages including barista-made coffee is available

                    Opening Hours

                    • Monday to Friday: 6:15 am to 6:45 pm
                    • Saturday and Sunday: 8:30 am to 4:00 pm and 5.00 pm to 6.45 pm
                    • Public Holidays: 8:30 am to 4:00 pm and 5:00 pm to 6:45 pm (minor changes to the range of items available).

                    Catering

                    • The Food Service Department can supply catering for events large and small. For further information or orders please contact us via [email protected] or phone 03 6777 6526.

                    COVID-19 changes

                    During the declared COVID-19 emergency due to social distancing requirements the Cafeteria is only open to hospital staff for dine-in meals. Patients and approved hospital visitors (in-line with the COVID-19 visitor restrictions) are able to access the cafeteria for takeaway only.

                    Meals and dietary requirements for patients

                    • As a patient, you will enjoy a choice of meals from the menu you are assigned.
                    • Your doctor, nurse, dietician or speech pathologist may choose a special diet as part of your treatment.
                    • You will receive your menu about 8:00 am daily to select your meals for the following day. It will be collected between 9:00 am and 11:00 am.
                    • If you have special dietary requirements including religious and cultural, food allergies or intolerances please tell your nurse or admissions staff.
                    • If you are in isolation, a nurse will deliver your meal.
                    Meal type Time
                    Water refill 6:30 am
                    Breakfast 8:00 am
                    Morning Tea 10:00 am to 10.15 am
                    Lunch 12:00 pm to 1:00 pm
                    Afternoon Tea 2:00 pm
                    Evening Meal 5:10 pm to 6:10 pm
                    Supper 7:15 pm to 7:30 pm

                    Kiosk

                    • The kiosk is on Level 3.
                    • The kiosk is run by volunteers.
                    • It is open between Monday to Friday from 11:00 am to 5.30 pm.
                    • It serves a variety of hot and cold food, drinks, sweets, and ice creams.
                    • It also sells toys, newspapers flowers, and toiletry items.
                    • EFTPOS is available for payment.
                    • The kiosk is run by volunteers.
                    • All profits go to buying hospital equipment and patient amenities.

                    Flowers

                    • Flowers are available from the kiosk.
                    • Please check with nursing staff or the ward clerk whether flowers are allowed on your ward. Flowers are not permitted in the Intensive Care Unit and Acute Medical Unit.

                    Radio/Television

                    Each bed has a personal overhead television. Radio access is also available. No outside televisions or radios can be used within the hospital.

                    Rental agreements can be made for a period of one day, one week, two weeks or longer and the charge is dependent on the term of the rental. Payment should be made to the ward clerk.

                    Public Telephones

                    Public telephones are in the hospital’s main foyer, outside of the Emergency Department and on Level 4. Phone cards can be bought at the kiosk.

                    Mobile Phones

                    • Mobile phone charge stations are available near the front reception on Charles Street, ICU waiting room, Emergency Department and cafeteria. 
                    • Mobile phones can be used within the hospital. As a courtesy you should switch your phone to silent. Taking photos of staff, other patients and visitors without permission is strictly prohibited.

                    ATM

                    • An ATM is on Level 3 near the Volunteer Office.

                    Religion and chaplaincy services

                    • Chaplains are always available 24 hours per day, 7 days a week.
                    • They provide spiritual and emotional care and pastoral support for patients, carers, staff and families.
                    • They are available to listen and support all people in challenging situations.
                    • They support people of all faiths and people who do not share a faith.
                    • We can arrange pastoral visitors from other denominations and faiths.
                    • We can help with baptisms, naming ceremonies, weddings, and funerals.
                    • You can ask for a chaplain by asking nursing staff or hospital reception.

                    St Paul’s Chapel

                    • St Paul’s Chapel is on Level 3.
                    • It is a quiet place in the hospital.
                    • It is open to everyone regardless of your faith.
                    • We have a service every Sunday at 3:00 pm.

                    Social workers

                    • Social workers provide counselling, support and practical help.
                    • They can help you and your family if you are dealing with illness, hospitalisation or disability.
                    • You can ask for a social worker by visiting the Allied Health Department on Level 2 or phoning 6777 6245.
                    • You can also ask the ward staff to organise a social worker for you.

                    How social workers can help you

                    Our social workers can help you and your family with:

                    • planning for your admission and discharge from hospital
                    • grief, loss and trauma
                    • adjusting to illness, treatment and rehabilitation
                    • family and relationship concerns
                    • support for your carers and family
                    • work, money and legal issues (such as Centrelink, DVA, MAIB, Workers' Compensation)
                    • information and options for aged care
                    • support for chronic illness
                    • helping you and your family with your rights
                    • cultural issues and needs
                    • talking through your worries and plans.

                    Aboriginal Health Liaison Officer

                    We have an Aboriginal Health Liaison Officer available at the hospital. They can help you:

                    • if you identify as Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander
                    • access hospital and health services
                    • connect with services and people who can help support your cultural and other needs.

                    How to find the Aboriginal Health Liaison Officer

                    • The office is on Level 2 near the cafeteria.
                    • You can also contact them via the Social Work department.
                    • Or you can ask the admission or ward staff to do this for you.

                    Read more about Aboriginal Health Liason Officers

                    PTAS office

                    You may be able to apply for financial help towards travel and accommodation costs. This is through the Patient Travel Assistance Scheme (PTAS). It is available to you if you:

                    • must travel outside of Tasmania for specialist medical services
                    • have to get specialist help away from home
                    • are receiving oncology or dialysis within Tasmania
                    • need to travel more than 50 kilometres in distance one way.

                    How to find out more about PTAS

                    Learn more about travel support for patients

                    Refugee Health Social Work Services

                    • The Refugee Health Social Worker (RHSW) provides ongoing support to our refugee arrived community, temporary visa holders, seasonal workers and can offer support to the migrant community.
                    • This support is offered individually, as a family group or at a community level and it can be short or long term.
                    • The RHSW will help you to access hospital and interpreter services as well as other health services in the community.
                    • The RHSW will provide information and help you to access other services you may be entitled to if you are living with a disability or caring for someone with a disability.
                    • The social worker can offer you or your family counselling support.
                    • You do not have to be a patient in the hospital for the social worker to support you. The social worker offers support to new arrivals as well as to those who have lived in Tasmania for a while.

                    How to find the Refugee Health Social Worker

                    • The office is in the Northern Integrated Care Service building in the refugee health office on the ground floor where you will have already met the nurse and the social worker.
                    • You are very welcome to walk into the building and ask for the social worker.
                    • You can also contact them via the Social Work department.  
                    • Or you can ask the admission or ward staff to do this for you.

                    Cancer Information and Support Centre

                    • If you or a family member has cancer, there is a free information and support service.
                    • This is provided by the Cancer Council Tasmania and Leukemia Foundation.
                    • Address: 69 Howick Street, Launceston
                    • Phone: 03 6779 1100
                    • Hours: Monday to Friday, 9:30 am to 4:30 pm

                    McGrath Breast Care Nurses

                    • The McGrath Breast Care Nurse provides support to people with breast cancer.
                    • This service is also available to help your family, friends and carers.
                    • This is a free service.
                    • You can ask for the McGrath Breast Care Nurse while you are in hospital.
                    • You can also refer yourself.

                    Learn about breast care nurses

                    Spurr Wing and Spurr Wing House

                    Spurr Wing and Spurr Wing House is a ‘home away from home’ for patients receiving treatment and their families.

                    Who can stay here?

                    This accommodation is available for:

                    • country patients receiving daily treatments
                    • country patients undergoing procedures who need somewhere to stay overnight.
                    • parents of children who are inpatients.
                    • country and interstate immediate family members of inpatients.

                    Location and size

                    It is at 268 and 270 Charles Street, Launceston. This is a one-minute walk from the hospital. It has:

                    • single rooms
                    • twin-share rooms
                    • a flat for families with children
                    • a unit for people with disabilities
                    • self-contained two-bedroom unit.

                    Costs and how to book  

                    • Phone: 03 6331 2457
                    • You can also contact them via the Social Work department.

                    Quiet Room and Prayer Room

                    • There is a quiet room on Level 2 near the cafeteria.
                    • This room is open 24 hours a day, 7 days a week.
                    • Staff and patients can use this room.
                    • Please be respectful of others when using this space.

                    Baby Change and Feeding Facilities

                    There is a baby change and feeding room available for visitors and staff on Level 2. It is on the corridor between the cafeteria and the pre-admission clinic. There are also baby change facilities on Level 3 (near the Renal Unit).

                    Public Toilets

                    There are public toilets available throughout the hospital. They are clearly marked. Visitors must not use patient toilets on wards.

                    Smoking

                    Smoking is prohibited in all buildings and on the grounds of the LGH. The Public Health Act imposes financial penalties for anyone who fails to follow the no smoking rules. 

                    Transit Lounge

                    • The Transit Lounge is on Level 2, near the set of four lifts and the same level as the cafeteria.
                    • It is a waiting area for patients being admitted to or discharged from hospital – like when you arrive early at a hotel and your room isn’t ready, or you must check out early and need somewhere to wait.
                    • If you are being discharged or transferred to another hospital and waiting on the ward for a script, someone to pick you up or paperwork you can wait in the Transit Lounge.
                    • If you are being admitted from Emergency or a clinic and your ward bed isn’t ready you can wait in the Lounge.
                    • The Transit Lounge is open Monday to Friday from 9:30 am until 6:00 pm.
                    Last updated

                    At the Launceston General Hospital, we provide you with many treatments and services including:

                    • Medical care if you are in hospital
                    • services to help you when you leave the hospital
                    • emergency care in our Emergency Department
                    • care at specialist clinics if your doctor provides a referral letter.

                    Our services

                    Last updated

                    Welcome to the Launceston General Hospital.

                    • We provide inpatient and ambulatory services to Launceston and surrounding areas.
                    • We are the largest employer in the region with around 2,000 staff.
                    • We provide quality services in a culture of respect and trust.
                    • We always provide high levels of professionalism and a focus on performance and achieving results.
                    • We focus on teamwork within the hospital and with community providers.

                    Read more about Launceston General Hospital

                    • We are an accredited teaching hospital.
                    • We work with many universities to provide clinical experience in practice for students within different areas of medicine. nursing & midwifery, Allied Health and Pharmacy
                    • We have a close working partnership with the University of Tasmania.
                    • We have students from the schools of Medicine, Nursing and Midwifery, Pharmacy and Allied Health.
                    • The students are able to learn skills in a clinical environment.
                    • We are also a major teaching hospital for postgraduate trainees.
                    • The students work in specialty medicine, surgery and post-graduate nursing programs.

                    Receiving care from a medical student

                    • It is important for students to get as much clinical experience with real patients as they can.
                    • We encourage you to participate if you are comfortable.
                    • You have the right to refuse to have a student be part of your care.

                    Research and innovation at the hospital

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                    • The Volunteer Program at Launceston General Hospital provides many extra and complementary services that supplement the care and treatment of patients while in hospital.
                    • Volunteers add to our quality of health care by helping support patients, their families, the staff, visitors and the community within the hospital.
                    • Your contribution makes a huge impact on the Tasmanian community, and becoming a volunteer is a fantastic opportunity for you to play an important part in providing vital services to our community. Volunteers are recognisable in our hospital by their red striped shirts.

                    How to become a volunteer

                    The volunteer office is on Level 3 near the main entrance. If you are interested in volunteering please email volunteer services officer [email protected].

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                    Address:

                    274-280 Charles Street
                    Launceston, 7250

                    Postal address:

                    PO Box 1963
                    Launceston, 7250

                    Phone: 03 6777 6777

                    You can identify our staff by their official identification badge.

                    Key contacts

                    In an emergency or life threatening situation always call 000.

                    Feedback, compliments and complaints

                    • We are happy to receive feedback from you.
                    • This helps us to improve our services.
                    • We acknowledge, review and investigate all complaints. 
                    • We will respond by a phone call, email or letter.

                    How to provide feedback

                    You can provide a query, comment/suggestion, compliment or complaint through our Quality and Safety Unit

                    Your healthcare rights

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                    Address and contact information

                    Address

                    23 Brickport Road,
                    Burnie TAS 7320

                    Postal address

                    PO Box 258,
                    Burnie TAS 7320

                    Contact us

                    Phone: 03 6493 6000

                    Emergencies: Call 000

                    Temporary access information for outpatients

                    Construction of the antenatal clinic has commenced and is expected to take 10-12 months.

                    Paediatric outpatients can enter through the door on the right in the main entrance foyer.

                    Adult and allied health outpatients can access the outpatient department via the main corridor.

                    Information about North West Regional Hospital

                    COVID-19 visitor restrictions

                    • The safety of you and all patients, visitors and staff is very important.
                    • Restrictions means limiting the number of people in the hospital.
                    • This will help prevent any spread of coronavirus (COVID-19).

                    All visitors need to be fully vaccinated. Exemptions are available on compassionate grounds. Please contact the hospital for further information.

                    Please don’t visit the hospital if you or anyone you live with:

                    • has a cold, diarrhoea, vomiting or any infectious condition
                    • is unwell
                    • has a fever, cough, sore throat, runny nose or shortness of breath
                    • has lost their sense of taste or smell
                    • has been diagnosed with COVID-19 and is in isolation
                    • is awaiting a COVID-19 test result and is in isolation
                    • is a close contact, and is not permitted to enter or remain on the premises of a high-risk facility.

                    You may also be asked to leave while clinical and personal care procedures are being carried out.

                    For patient admission information, visit the For Patients section on our website.

                    For more information, go to Coronavirus.tas.gov.au.

                    Temporary access information for outpatients

                    • Construction of the antenatal clinic has commenced and is expected to take 10-12 months.
                    • Paediatric outpatients can enter through the door on the right in the main entrance foyer.
                    • Adult and allied health outpatients can access the outpatient department via the main corridor.

                    Visiting hours

                    • You may usually visit a patient between 2:30 pm and 6 pm daily.
                    • If you can’t get to the hospital during visiting hours, we may be able to arrange another time for you.
                    • Talk to the staff in charge of the ward if you want to visit outside normal visiting hours.
                    • It is recommended to contact us ahead of visiting to confirm any changes to rules and visiting hours.

                    Hand hygiene

                    • Please clean your hands using soap and water or a hand sanitiser. 
                    • You need to do this when you enter or leave the patient’s room or other areas of the hospital.

                    Visitor numbers

                    • You may be accompanied by a caregiver or support person if required however if you are independent and attending an appointment, it is recommended that the person bringing you does not attend the facility unless required.
                    • One visitor per patient per day for a maximum period of 30 mins between the hours of 2:30 pm and 6:00 pm.
                    • Exceptions are listed below for certain wards and parts of the hospital.

                    Visitors allowed:

                    Area / Ward

                    Number of visitors

                    Acute Medical Unit

                    Two support persons permitted

                    Department of Critical Care Medicine

                    Two visitors will be allowed at any one time

                    Emergency Department

                    A single visitor is permitted in the following circumstances:

                    • A parent/guardian of a dependent child
                    • A support person for a patient requiring significant physical, communication or comprehension assistance.
                    • On compassionate grounds.

                    We understand that coming to an Emergency Department can be very stressful, but these restrictions are necessary to reduce crowding in the busy Emergency Department and waiting areas.

                    Maternity Unit

                    An upper limit of two people to support mothers in the maternity unit (this limit of two includes the partner, if the partner is present).

                    Medical C Ward

                    Visitors are not permitted unless by exemption

                    Medical Ward

                    Medical Ward closed to visitors from 1800hrs 19th July 2022 until further notice. Exemptions under exceptional circumstances.

                    Surgical Ward One visitor per patient, for a maximum of 30 minutes per visit.

                    Paediatric Unit

                    Visitor numbers to the NWRH Paediatric Ward are restricted to two (2) visitors/support people (inclusive of parents).

                    Palliative Care

                    An upper limit of four visitor for patients receiving end-of-life care, and the capacity for one visitor to stay overnight and for pets to visit where appropriate.

                    Operating Theatre and Recovery Room

                    Visitors not routinely allowed. Parents may visit children post-surgery

                    Outpatient clinics and community centres

                    Support person only

                    What can I bring?

                    • You can bring patients things like books, magazines and fruit. 
                    • Some wards like the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) do not allow flowers. 
                    • Please contact us before bringing or sending someone flowers.
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                    • We have drop off and pick up zones in front of the main entrance and emergency department.
                    • If you need to borrow a wheelchair, please ask a volunteer at the main entrance.     

                    Parking

                    • We have a multi-story car park at the hospital. 
                    • You access the car park from Hospital Street. 
                    • The car park is open 24/7.
                    • There are disabled parking spaces in several locations around the hospital and in the car park.

                    Public transport

                    • There is a bus stop outside the hospital in Hospital Street
                    • Visit the Metro Tasmania website for current bus information and timetables.

                    Taxis

                    • You'll have to call your own taxi as we do not provide them at the hospital.
                    • Taxi pick-up is at the front of the main entrance.
                    • Burnie Taxi Service – phone 03 6431 2199
                    • Latrobe Taxi Service – phone 03 6424 1431

                    Help with parking costs

                    You can get discounted parking if you meet certain criteria. This is called concessional parking. To get concessional parking or permit for you or your carer, you must:

                    • be staying in hospital patient accommodation
                    • be a hospital volunteer or driver

                    If you go to hospital for renal dialysis or oncology (cancer) treatment, you’ll get free parking by displaying your hospital permit.

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                    • Learn about all the facilities and services available for patients and visitors at the hospital.
                    • For patient admission information, visit the For Patients section on our website.

                    Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander services

                    • A hospital liaison officer (HLO)is available at the hospital.
                    • They can help you and your family if you are an Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander patient.
                    • They provide emotional, social and cultural support.
                    • They also help you with discharge planning, accessing other services and follow-up care.
                    • Please contact uto arrange an HLO.

                    Admission Discharge Unit (ADU)

                    • The North West Regional Admission Discharge Unit is the central hub for patients being discharged.
                    • The ADU team will help with your discharge arrangements.
                    • The ADU is located on the ground floor of the hospital in the Medical Ward. 
                    • It’s a designated pick-up zone for patients, families and carers.
                    • Patients may also be transported to the main entrance by our staff for pick up.

                    Counselling and spiritual care

                    • Illness, injury and time in hospital can be difficult for you and your family.
                    • We have social workers and multi-faith hospital chaplains who can help you.
                    • Please contact us to arrange these services.

                    Interpreter services

                    • We have a person available to help you understand health information if you don’t speak English or have hearing difficulties.
                    • This person is called an ‘interpreter’.
                    • This service is free and available 24 hours a day.
                    • Your interpreter can help by being with you in person, through video conference or over the phone.

                    How to book an interpreter

                    • Phone: 03 6166 7000
                    • Email: [email protected]
                    • After-hours and on-call (emergency): point to the interpreter or Auslan symbol at hospital reception.

                    Kiosk services

                    • Our hospital kiosk is on the ground floor of hospital, opposite pre-admission.
                    • We sell food, drinks, toiletries and gifts.
                    • There are indoor and outdoor eating area. 
                    • A trolley is taken around the wards daily for patients to buy newspapers, magazines and snacks.

                    Opening hours

                    • Monday to Friday, 10 am to 4:30 pm
                    • Saturday to Sunday, 2 pm to 4 pm
                    • Public holidays, 2 pm to 4 pm

                    No smoking, alcohol and drugs

                    • You can’t smoke, use alcohol or illicit drugs at any of our hospitals or health centres.
                    • This includes in any building or facility, the grounds, or within five metres of their boundaries.
                    • Don’t bring them to hospital and ask your visitors not to bring them to hospital.
                    • This applies to staff, patients, visitors, contractors and anyone entering our buildings, grounds or vehicles.

                    Security

                    • All external doors are alarmed after evening visiting.
                    • Entrance and exit to the hospital during 8.00pm to 8.00am will be via the Emergency Department.

                    Telephones

                    • Mobile phones can be used in most areas of the hospital, including your room. 
                    • We’ll let you know if you can’t use them.
                    • Bedside phones for patients are supplied. 
                    • Instructions on how to use these are on the telephone handset.
                    • Public telephones are located at convenient positions around the hospital.

                    TV and radio

                    • Due to safety reasons, private electrical appliances, including television and radios aren’t allowed.
                    • Private battery-operated radios, mobile phones, iPads, iPods and tables are allowed.
                    • They must be used with headphones. 
                    • We don’t accept any responsibility if any of your items are lost.
                    • There’s usually an interactive patient station at your bedside. 
                    • You may have to pay for the television.

                        

                    Last updated

                    At the North West Regional Hospital, we provide you with many treatments and services including:

                    • medical care if you are in hospital
                    • services to help you when you leave hospital
                    • emergency care in our Emergency Department
                    • care at specialist clinics if your doctor provides a referral letter.           

                    For information about the Northern Cancer Service, please visit their website.

                    Services

                    Last updated

                    We acknowledge and respect Tasmanian Aboriginal people as the traditional owners and ongoing custodians of the land on which we work and live, and pay respect to Elders past, present and emerging.

                    North West Regional Hospital is a modern 160-bed facility servicing North West Tasmania and King Island.

                    • We provide high-quality healthcare and specialist services in medical, surgical and allied health specialties through inpatient and outpatient departments.
                    • We also cater for the emergency resuscitation, surgery and intensive care of most trauma patients and other medical conditions.
                    • As a secondary level service, we transfer patients to comprehensive tertiary hospitals for some injuries and illnesses.
                    • We are the largest major hospital in North West Tasmania.
                    • We provide acute general hospital services to King Island, West Coast, Latrobe and Kentish.

                    Donations, gifts and bequests

                    • We appreciate the generosity of Tasmanians, small businesses and large corporations.
                    • All donations enable us to maintain high standards of patient care through equipment purchases and upgrading of facilities and services.
                    • We follow strict rules to ensure gifts are safe, appropriate and free of infection.
                    • All soft or fluffy toys, wooden items, games and other donated items must be new.
                    • To make a donation, gift or bequest, please contact us.

                    Volunteering at the hospital

                    For information about volunteering at North West Regional Hospital, please contact us.

                    Our history

                    The North West Regional Hospital was built in 1994 and was originally owned privately by Burnie Hospital Limited and leased to the Tasmanian Government.

                    The Tasmanian Government entered an agreement to buy the North West Regional Hospital in 2010, to invest in and expand the facility.

                    The hospital now offers services in medical, surgical and allied health specialities through inpatient and outpatient departments, as well as catering for the emergency resuscitation, surgery and intensive care of most trauma patients and other medical conditions.

                    Last updated

                    In an emergency, call 000.

                    Opening hours

                    • Hospital hours: 24-hours, 7-days a week
                    • Office hours (general enquiries): 8:00am to 5:00pm

                    Address

                    • Street address: 23 Brickport Road, Burnie TAS 7320
                    • Postal address: PO Box 258, Burnie TAS 7320

                    Contact us

                    Feedback, compliments and complaints

                    • We are happy to receive feedback from you.
                    • This helps us to improve our services.
                    • We acknowledge, review and investigate all complaints. 
                    • We will respond by a phone call, email or letter.

                    How to provide feedback

                    You can provide a query, comment/suggestion, compliment or complaint through our Quality and Safety Unit

                    • Phone: 1800 062 322
                    • Write to: Quality and Patient Safety Service, Tasmanian Health Service North West, PO Box 21, Latrobe, 7307
                    • Email: [email protected]
                    • Ask a staff member for a feedback form
                    • Use the online feedback form.

                    Your healthcare rights

                    Last updated
                    Last updated

                    Address and contact information

                    Address

                    Torquay Road,
                    Latrobe TAS 7307

                    Postal address

                    PO Box 21,
                    Latrobe TAS 7307

                    Contact us

                    Phone: 03 6478 5500

                    Emergencies: Call 000

                    Information about Mersey Community Hospital

                    COVID-19 visitor restrictions

                    • The safety of you and all patients, visitors and staff is very important.
                    • Restrictions means limiting the number of people in the hospital.
                    • This will help prevent any spread of coronavirus (COVID-19).

                    All visitors need to be fully vaccinated. Exemptions are available on compassionate grounds. Please contact the hospital for further information.

                    Please don’t visit the hospital if you or anyone you live with:

                    • has a cold, diarrhoea, vomiting or any infectious condition
                    • is unwell
                    • has a fever, cough, sore throat, runny nose or shortness of breath
                    • has lost their sense of taste or smell
                    • has been diagnosed with COVID-19 and is in isolation
                    • is awaiting a COVID-19 test result and is in isolation
                    • is a close contact, and is not permitted to enter or remain on the premises of a high-risk facility.

                    You may also be asked to leave while clinical and personal care procedures are being carried out.

                    For patient admission information, visit the For Patients section on our website.

                    For more information, go to Coronavirus.tas.gov.au.

                    Visiting hours

                    • You may usually visit a patient between 2 pm and 6 pm daily.
                    • If you can’t get to the hospital during visiting hours, we may be able to arrange another time for you.
                    • Talk to the staff in charge of the ward if you want to visit outside normal visiting hours.
                    • It is recommended to contact us ahead of visiting to confirm any changes to rules and visiting hours.

                    Hand hygiene

                    • Please clean your hands using soap and water or a hand sanitiser. 
                    • You need to do this when you enter or leave the patient’s room or other areas of the hospital.

                    Visitor numbers

                    • You may be accompanied by a caregiver or support person if required however if you are independent and attending an appointment, it is recommended that the person bringing you does not attend the facility unless required.
                    • One visitor per patient per day for a maximum period of 30 mins between the hours of 2:00 pm and 6:00 pm.
                    • Exceptions are listed below for certain wards and parts of the hospital.

                    Area/Ward

                    Number of visitors

                    Outpatient clinics and community centres

                    Support person only

                    Department of Critical Care Medicine

                    Two visitors will be allowed at any one time

                    Emergency Department

                    A single visitor is permitted in the following circumstances:

                    • A parent/guardian of a dependent child.
                    • A support person for a patient requiring significant physical, communication or comprehension assistance.
                    • On compassionate grounds.

                    We understand that coming to an Emergency Department can be very stressful, but these restrictions are necessary to reduce crowding in the busy Emergency Department and waiting areas.

                    Neonatal Intensive Care

                    Parents / Carers have unrestricted visiting with a maximum of two people visiting.

                    Compassionate situation – exemptions may be applied for siblings.

                    Paediatric Unit

                    Parents / Carers have unrestricted visiting with a maximum of two people visiting.

                    Maternity Unit

                    An upper limit of two people to support mothers in the maternity unit (this limit of two includes the partner, if the partner is present).

                    Operating Theatre and Recovery Room

                    Visitors not routinely allowed. Parents may visit children post-surgery

                    Short Stay Surgical Unit

                    One support person permitted

                    Palliative Care

                    An upper limit of four visitors for patients receiving end-of-life care, and the capacity for one visitor to stay overnight and for pets to visit where appropriate.

                    What can I bring?

                    • You can bring patients things like books, magazines and fruit. 
                    • Some wards like the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) do not allow flowers. 
                    • Please contact us before bringing or sending someone flowers.
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                    We have drop off and pick up zones in front of the main entrance and emergency department.

                    Parking

                    • We have free parking for patients and visitors at the car park located on Torquay Road. 
                    • We also have disabled parking in front of the hospital.
                    • If you need to borrow a wheelchair, please ask an attendant at the main entrance.

                    Public transport

                    • There is a bus stop outside the Mersey Community Hospital in Torquay Road Street.
                    • Visit the Metro Tasmania website for current bus information and timetables.

                    Taxis

                    • You'll have to call your own taxi as we do not provide them at the hospital.
                    • Taxi pick-up is at the front of the main entrance and emergency department.

                     

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                    • Learn about all the facilities and services available for patients and visitors at the hospital.
                    • For patient admission information, visit the For Patients section on our website.

                    Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander services

                    • A hospital liaison officer (HLO) is available at the hospital.
                    • They can help you and your family if you are an Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander patient.
                    • They provide emotional, social and cultural support.
                    • They also help you with discharge planning, accessing other services and follow-up care.
                    • Please contact us to arrange an HLO.

                    Counselling and spiritual care

                    • Illness, injury and time in hospital can be difficult for you and your family.
                    • We have social workers and multi-faith hospital chaplains who can help you.
                    • Please contact us to arrange these services.

                    Interpreter services

                    • We have a person available to help you understand health information if you don’t speak English or have hearing difficulties.
                    • This person is called an ‘interpreter’.
                    • This service is free and available 24 hours a day.
                    • Your interpreter can help by being with you in person, through video conference or over the phone.

                    How to book an interpreter

                    • Phone: 03 6166 7000
                    • Email: [email protected]
                    • After-hours and on-call (emergency): point to the interpreter or Auslan symbol at hospital reception.

                    Kiosk services

                    • Our hospital kiosk is on the ground floor of hospital, opposite the emergency department.
                    • We sell food, drinks, toiletries and gifts.
                    • There are indoor and outdoor eating area. 
                    • A trolley is taken around the wards daily for patients to buy newspapers, magazines and snacks.

                    Opening hours

                    • Monday to Friday, 9 am to 6 pm
                    • Saturday to Sunday, 1:30 pm to 6:00 pm
                    • Closed all public holidays

                    No smoking, alcohol and drugs

                    • You can’t smoke, use alcohol or illicit drugs at any of our hospitals or health centres.
                    • This includes in any building or facility, the grounds, or within five metres of their boundaries.
                    • Don’t bring them to hospital and ask your visitors not to bring them to hospital.
                    • This applies to staff, patients, visitors, contractors and anyone entering our buildings, grounds or vehicles.

                    Telephones

                    • Mobile phones can be used in most areas of the hospital, including your room. 
                    • We’ll let you know if you can’t use them.
                    • Bedside phones for patients are supplied. 
                    • Instructions on how to use these are on the telephone handset.
                    • Public telephones are located at convenient positions around the hospital.

                    Transit Lounge

                    • Our Transit Lounge is the central hub for patients being discharged.
                    • The lounge team will help with your discharge arrangements.
                    • The transit lounge is located on the ground floor of the hospital opposite the Emergency Department.
                    • It’s a designated drop off and pick up zone for patients, families and carers.

                    TV and radio

                    • Due to safety reasons, private electrical appliances, including television and radios aren’t allowed.
                    • Private battery-operated radios, mobile phones, iPads, iPods and tables are allowed.
                    • They must be used with headphones. 
                    • We don’t accept any responsibility if any of your items are lost.
                    • There’s usually an interactive patient station at your bedside. 
                    • You may have to pay for the television.
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                    At the Mersey Community Hospital, we provide you with many treatments and services including:

                    • medical care if you are in hospital
                    • services to help you when you leave hospital
                    • emergency care in our Emergency Department
                    • care at specialist clinics if your doctor provides a referral letter.  

                    For information about the Northern Cancer Service, please visit their website.

                    Services

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                    We acknowledge and respect Tasmanian Aboriginal people as the traditional owners and ongoing custodians of the land on which we work and live, and pay respect to Elders past, present and emerging.

                    Mersey Community Hospital is highly regarded for timely, safe and high-quality services. For over 120 years, we have enjoyed the very strong staff and community support.

                    • We have 95 beds and over 610 staff providing quality general and specialist healthcare services to our community.
                    • We are fully accredited by the Australian Council on Healthcare Standards.
                    • We have a comprehensive undergraduate and graduate clinical training program and close ties with the University of Tasmania Rural Clinical School and with TAFE Tasmania.
                    • We work closely with other hospitals and primary health services to support patients across the region.

                    Donations, gifts and bequests

                    • We appreciate the generosity of Tasmanians, small businesses and large corporations.
                    • All donations enable us to maintain high standards of patient care through equipment purchases and upgrading of facilities and services.
                    • We follow strict rules to ensure gifts are safe, appropriate and free of infection.
                    • All soft or fluffy toys, wooden items, games and other donated items must be new.
                    • To make a donation, gift or bequest, please contact us

                    Our history

                    A hospital was first opened at Latrobe in 1889 called the Devon Cottage Hospital. It relocated to a larger site in 1903 and was renamed the Devon Public Hospital.

                    In 1961 the Mersey General Hospital was opened at the current site and was later named the Mersey Community Hospital.

                    The Australian Government purchased the Mersey Community Hospital in 2007 amid community concern about the delivery of health services.  The hospital was then funded by the Australian Government under successive Heads of Agreement’s with the Tasmanian Government.

                    On 1 July 2017, the Australian Government transferred ownership of the Mersey Community Hospital to the Tasmanian Government with a ten year funding deal, after which it will be fully funded and operated by the Department of Health.

                    The Mersey Community Hospital is highly regarded for its delivery of timely, safe and high quality services and for the past 120 years has enjoyed very strong staff and community support

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                    In an emergency, call 000

                    We are a large hospital with 24-hour accident and emergency care.  We offer dedicated elective surgery and a mix of general hospital services to the local community.

                    Opening hours:

                    • Hospital hours: 24-hours, 7-days a week
                    • Office hours (general enquiries): 8 am to 5 pm

                    Address:

                    • Street address: Torquay Road, Latrobe TAS 7307
                    • Postal address: PO Box 21, Latrobe TAS 7307

                    Contact details:

                    Feedback, compliments and complaints

                    • We are happy to receive feedback from you.
                    • This helps us to improve our services.
                    • We acknowledge, review and investigate all complaints. 
                    • We will respond by a phone call, email or letter.

                    How to provide feedback

                    You can provide a query, comment/suggestion, compliment or complaint through our Quality and Safety Unit

                    • Phone: 1800 062 322
                    • Write to: Quality and Patient Safety Service, Tasmanian Health Service North West, PO Box 21, Latrobe, 7307
                    • Email: [email protected]
                    • Ask a staff member for a feedback form
                    • Use the online feedback form.

                    Your healthcare rights

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                    See our public health campaigns

                    Support in Tasmania

                    If you are at immediate risk or in danger call Tasmania Police on 000.

                    Sexual Assault Support Services

                    24-hour crisis support is available from various services around Tasmania. It is free to access.
                    They can provide support in a number of ways, including

                    • Attending the hospital with the survivor should they wish to undergo medical or forensic examination
                    • Attending the police station should they wish to make a statement
                    • Assisting the survivor to connect with counselling services for ongoing counselling and support

                     

                    24-hour crisis support phone:

                    1800 MYSUPPORT (1800 697 877)

                     

                    North West

                    Laurel House
                    Phone: (03) 6431 9711
                    Website: www.laurelhouse.org.au (this website has a QUICK EXIT button)

                    North

                    Laurel House
                    Phone: (03) 6334 2740
                    Website: www.laurelhouse.org.au (this website has a QUICK EXIT button)

                    South

                    Sexual Assault Support Service (SASS)
                    Phone: (03) 6231 0044
                    Website: www.sass.org.au (this website has a QUICK EXIT button)

                    Family Violence Counselling and Support Service (FVCSS)

                    All FVCSS services are voluntary and free of cost.
                     
                    Services include:
                    • Information, counselling, and support
                    • Safety planning
                    • Assistance to access a police response to intimate partner family violence matters
                    • Referrals and advocacy


                    Family Violence Counselling and Support Service

                    9:00am – midnight on weekdays
                    4:00pm – midnight on weekends and public holidays
                     

                    24/7 phone and online counselling

                    1800 RESPECT

                    Phone: 1800 737 732

                     

                    Lifeline counselling and support

                    Phone: 13 11 14

                    More information

                    Organisation Website QUICK EXIT button
                    Alcohol and Drug Foundation www.adf.org.au No
                    Youth, Family and Community Connections www.yfcc.com.au No
                    Tasmania Police www.police.tas.gov.au Yes
                    White Ribbon www.whiteribbon.org.au Yes
                    Safe at home www.safeathome.tas.gov.au Yes
                     
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                    Sexual Assault and Family Violence Forensic Services logo
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                    If you are at immediate risk or in danger call Tasmania Police on 000.

                    What is sexual assault?

                    Sexual Assault is any unwanted behaviour of a sexual nature that makes a person feel uncomfortable, frightened, or threatened. It can occur when a person is forced, tricked, or coerced into sexual behaviour without agreeing to it.

                    Sexual assault includes inappropriate touching or kissing of a person's body, even through clothes (indecent assault), or having sex with someone without their consent (rape).

                    Rape typically refers to sexual intercourse with another person without their consent. It involves penetration of a person's vagina, genitalia, anus or mouth by a penis, other body part, or an object.

                    Sexual assault can also involve exposing another person to sexual behaviour without their consent, such as masturbating in front of them or forcing the person to watch pornography.

                    It is a crime to use threats or intimidation to force another person to have sexual Intercourse.

                    It is a crime to have sexual intercourse with a person under the age of 17 or to involve them in any sexual act.

                    Sexual assault can occur to anyone. All ages, genders, and backgrounds.

                    What is consent?

                    Consent means that a person freely agrees to the sexual activity.

                    Someone does NOT consent if they do not say or do anything to communicate consent.

                    There are some situations where, even if the person says “yes”, they cannot consent. These include if;

                    • they under the influence of drugs or alcohol,
                    • they have a serious mental or intellectual disability which affects their ability to understand what is happening,
                    • they are forced, threatened, or kept against their will,
                    • they are coerced,
                    • they are confused about the act or who the person was.

                    A person cannot consent to sexual activity if they are under 17, unless the similar age defence applies. This is where two young people have sex or do a sexual act together and they both consent , and

                    • both are over 15 years old and the age gap between them is not more than 5 years, or
                    • both are over 12 years old, and the age gap is not more than 3 years. If you have been sexually assaulted it is never your fault.

                    If you have been sexually assaulted it is never your fault.

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                    Your options following an assault

                    As a survivor of a recent sexual assault or family violence assault there are various options available to you.

                     

                    1. Support organisations

                    You can seek information, advice or counselling from a Sexual Assault or Family Violence Support organisation.

                     

                    2. Medical examination

                    You can have a medical examination. This can include assessment and treatment of injuries and provision of emergency contraception and antibiotics for STI if needed.

                     

                    3. Forensic Medical Examination (FME)

                    You can also choose to have a Forensic Medical Examination (FME). As well as a medical examination this will involve recording of injuries and collection of biological samples which can be used as evidence. You can have an FME without reporting the assault to the police.

                     

                    4. Report to the police

                    You can report the assault to the police for information only (informal) or for investigation (formal). Learn about the difference on our reporting to police page.

                     

                    5. Don't report to the police

                    You can choose not to report the assault to the police.

                     

                    6. Any combination of the above

                    You can choose several of the above options to support you as a survivor of a recent sexual assault or family violence.

                     

                    7. To do nothing at all

                    You can choose not to do anything.

                    Forensic Medical Examinations (FME)

                    What is an FME?

                    Forensic Medical Examinations are a free service provided at Royal Hobart Hospital, Launceston General Hospital and the North West Regional Hospital. All Tasmanian hospitals are able to refer you if you need help. An FME is done to document injuries and to collect evidence that may be used in a court.

                    FMEs are done by qualified Forensic Examiners, doctors or nurses/midwives who have been trained in the field of forensic evidence gathering. The FME record is kept separate from your medical records and only released with your consent.

                    Please note

                    A Forensic Medical Examination cannot confirm or deny whether a sexual assault took place.

                     

                    What do I need to do?

                    If you have had a recent sexual assault and are going to have a forensic examination and/or report to the police there are some things you can do to make it more likely that evidence will be collected. If possible:

                    • Don’t wash or have a shower
                    • Don’t change your clothes
                    • Don’t eat, drink or clean your teeth
                    • Don’t go to the toilet

                     

                    What happens at an FME?

                    If you choose to have an FME the Forensic Examiner will meet with you to explain what will happen during the examination. You will be asked to sign a consent form to proceed. Your consent can be withdrawn at any time, it is up to you.

                    The Forensic Examiner will ask you about the assault and what happened to you in order to guide the examination. They will then check your body for any injuries, and take swabs and samples if necessary. They will explain what they are doing at each step and you may decline any or all parts of the examination at any stage if you wish. You will be offered emergency contraception and STI treatment and follow up if required.

                     

                    Will the police be involved?

                    A FME can be done with or without a report to the police. The samples will be stored until you decide whether you would like to proceed with a report. They will not be processed or released to the police without your consent.

                     

                    Is there a time limit?

                    The sooner an FME is done, the more likely it is that evidence will be collected. Ideally an FME should be done within 24 hours of the assault. However, examinations can be done up to 7 days after the assault in some cases.

                    Even if you are unsure whether to proceed with a report to the police, having the FME done will give you more options in the future.

                     

                    How do I get an FME?

                    If you choose to have an FME you can arrange one by contacting either the Emergency Department at any hospital, Tasmania Police, or one of the Crisis Support Organisations listed on our where to find support page.

                    More information

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                    Common symptoms and reactions

                    • It is normal to feel anxious, trembling or shaking, rapid breathing, or experience stomach tightening, churning or nausea. Please contact a crisis support service for counselling and follow up.
                    • You may notice some bruising or mild discomfort. Apply ice to the sore areas for 20 minutes at a time, 4 times a day if needed for up to 2 days. Use of over the counter pain medication may also be helpful.
                    • If you notice new bruising or injury you should follow up with the hospital or your doctor. It is also recommended that you contact the forensic service or police and arrange further examination or photographs if needed.

                    Dangerous symptoms and reactions to watch for

                    If you have been strangled or choked there are some important signs you should watch for over the next few days.

                    Symptoms of internal injuries may appear quickly or develop over a few days after the assault. Internal injuries can be serious and even fatal.

                    Make sure someone you trust stays with you for the next 24-72 hours.

                     

                    If you notice any of the following symptoms, you should call 000 or go to the nearest Emergency Department immediately.

                     

                    • Difficulty breathing, shortness of breath, persistent cough, or coughing up blood
                    • Increasing or severe headache, not relieved by pain medication
                    • Difficulty speaking or understanding speech, changes to your voice
                    • Swelling to your throat, neck or tongue, or increasing pain
                    • Difficulty swallowing or a lump in throat, muscle spasm in throat or neck
                    • Loss of consciousness or ‘passing out’, confusion, dizziness or light-headedness, seizures, ringing in the ears
                    • Drooping eyelid or sudden vision problems, one pupil larger than the other
                    • Difficulty walking, right or left sided weakness, numbness or tingling, loss of balance
                    • Vomiting up blood, or persistent vomiting
                    • Prolonged nose bleed (greater than 10 minutes)
                    • Loss of control of bladder or bowel
                    • Thoughts of harming yourself or others
                    • Behavioural changes or memory loss

                     

                    If you are pregnant, report the strangulation and any of the following symptoms to your doctor/antenatal clinic immediately.

                    • Decreased baby movements
                    • Vaginal spotting or bleeding, or fluid loss
                    • Stomach pain
                    • Contractions

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                    Please note

                    This information is provided as a guideline only. Timeline and process may vary depending on individual circumstances.

                    Informal

                    An informal police report is for information only and no investigation is conducted. Your statement and the information provided is recorded and filed but not acted on.

                    Notifications can be made to relevant agencies, if needed, based on risk (for example, Child Safety, Work with Vulnerable Persons etc.)

                    A referral can be made to a Sexual Assault Support Service based on your location. This cannot be made without your consent.

                    Formal

                    A formal report will allow police to conduct an investigation.

                    The investigation will include:

                    • A vulnerable witness interview (or a Statutory Declaration in the presence of a witness intermediary for children or adults with communication needs).
                    • A Forensic Medical Examination (if appropriate) with support provided by a Sexual Assault Support Service based on your location. This cannot be done without your consent.
                    • Collection of exhibits (such as physical exhibits, CCTV, electronic evidence etc.)
                    • Completion and submission of medical release forms (if relevant)
                    • Statutory Declarations provided by witnesses
                    • Identification/interview of the alleged offender
                    • Other enquiries as necessary/relevant

                     

                    Evidence threshold

                    If the evidence threshold is met:

                    • The offender is charged. The offender may be bailed or detained for court
                    • A request will be made for bail conditions to protect the reporting person (where necessary)

                    If the evidence threshold is NOT met:

                    • A Restraint Order/Family Violence Order may be applied for to protect the reporting person (where necessary)
                    • The matter will be reviewed by the Detective Inspector
                    • If further independent review is required the matter will be referred to the Director of Public Prosecution to recommend how to proceed

                    More information

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                    Publications and resources

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