Listen and Learn Series

Tasmania has set itself the goal of having the healthiest population in Australia by 2025

The Listen and Learn series provided six free 90-minute online sessions exploring how you and your organisation can help Tasmanians live longer and healthier lives.

Each session included:

  • local insights from specialist presenters
  • question and answer sessions
  • in-depth group discussions
  • practical ideas you can use to promote health and wellbeing.

Sessions

To find out what happened at each of the sessions view the session and graphic art in the output/resources below:

Session Output / Resources

Session 1 - Solutions in current times  >

The first of the Healthy Tasmania ‘Listen and Learn’ sessions explored practical solutions adopted during COVID 19 restrictions. It covered a range of ideas that will inform our work with communities and organisations.

Leigh Arnold facilitated the interviews with our two guest presenters, before inviting participants to share in small groups their own experiences and examples.

Fiona Miller captured the content in this great graphic. It is one piece of the puzzle when working to improve health and wellbeing. (click on graphic for larger view)

Session Presentations

Watch the interviews with the speakers and see Fiona share her visual representation here.

The first of the speakers was Dr Lynn Jarvis CEO Working It Out (WIO). Lynn spoke about how ‘Working It Out Together’ responded to the needs of the LGBTIQ+ community during COVID-19 in Tasmania. The initiative used networks and publicity to extend their reach and connect volunteers to support members in the LGBTIQ+ community.

The second speaker was Elizabeth Mahnken, Priority Populations Officer Public Health Services (PHS). Liz spoke about strategies for communicating and engaging with a diverse range of people. She shared the lessons learnt in setting up,and engaging with the Migrant Support Network. Liz spoke of the importance of partnerships, involving decision-makers and about tapping into the skills and knowledge within communities.

Speaker

Topic

Time

Leigh Arnold

Introduces Dr Lynn Jarvis, CEO, Working it Out

1:33-2:35

Lynn Jarvis

Lynn discusses:

The Working it out Together project responding to COVID-19

2:48-3:14

How COVID-19 has affected the LGBTQI+ community in Tasmania

3:25-4:55

The loss of safe spaces for LGBTIQ+ people during COVID-19

5:18-6:33

Lessons learnt since the start of the pandemic

7:51-12:06

The importance of taking action and where to put energy

12:54-14:18

Questions raised by participants

14:40-23:02

Leigh Arnold

Introduces Liz Mahnken, Priority Populations Officer Public Health Services

24:02-25:11

Liz Mahnken

Liz talks about:

The Migrant Support Network set up in response to COVID-19

25:24-28:09

The importance of working in partnerships, particularly during COVID-19

28:55-31:20

It’s not about ‘hard to reach’ people but how we communicate

31:36-34:49

Answers questions from participants

36:58-44:55

Fiona Miller

Graphic artist shares her graphic harvest summary of the session

47:15-50:31

Resources

Discussion

Participants discussed the following question. Consider what your response would be?

Based on what you heard today, or what you have done in your organisation, can you share a solution for a health and well-being challenge faced by communities during COVID-19?

Here are just a few responses from session participants:

  • Ensuring sight impaired people included through phone service
  • Adaption... rolling up sleeves and doing things in a different way. For e.g. Neighbourhood Houses did lots of social media to keep people engaged and was a way to inform. So, the whole idea of being adaptive.
  • The Live Well Live Long program moved from face to face sessions to being run via community radio
  • Tasmanian Health Pathways kept all Primary Care health professionals up to date in a rapidly changing environment. Any changes in the care of health conditions could be included here as well as any service changes and referral processes.
  • Group exercise sessions held on FB and Zoom with equipment delivered (thanks to local council support) delivered to participants in all sorts of locations on Flinders Island.
  • Local to local... e.g. local GPs making short videos for locals in their community
  • Chronic Disease sector collaboration on shared risks and concerns about people delaying attending ED or calling 000. Sharing resources and programs to get messages out. Using a cross section of platforms, adapting to on-line from face to face delivery.
  • Funding for volunteer training for people with mental health issues
  • Networks responding to the crisis - moving forward: strengthening government awareness of the assets in the community, local government and NGOs - lessons learned from the pandemic.
  • We put up on website and Facebook a lot of short clips with simple message on unintentional injury. Some interactive for children.

For more information or to register for upcoming sessions visit Healthy Tasmania

Session 2 - Wellbeing in our work  >

- ways to embed mental health promotion and prevention

The second Healthy Tasmania ‘Listen and Learn’ session explored resources and useful examples of how to promote mental wellbeing personally and in the workplace.

Leigh Arnold facilitated the interviews with our two guest presenters, before inviting participants to share in small groups their own tips to stay mentally well.

Fiona Miller captured the content in this great graphic. It is one piece of the puzzle when working to improve health and wellbeing. (click on graphic for larger view)


Session Presentations

Watch the interviews with the speakers and see Fiona share her visual representation here.

The first of the speakers was Suzanne Schultz, Community Planning and Development Officer from Clarence City Council who shared the tool ‘My Wellbeing Kit’, that has been developed to build resilience and support mental wellbeing. Suzanne explained how the resource cards have been effectively used in multiple settings by a diverse range of people to help them work out ways to improve their wellbeing.

Dr Astrid Wooton, CEO of Flourish Tasmania, spoke about the mental health continuum and the importance of self-reflection and checking in with yourself and others. Astrid provided practical advice and a great analogy of not allowing your emotional stress jug to get too full by actively using strategies to reduce stress and maintain mental wellness.

Speaker

Topic

Time

Leigh Arnold

Introduces Suzanne Schultz Community Planning and Development Officer with Clarence City Council

2:09-2:55

Suzanne Schultz

Suzanne speaks about:

The development of ‘My Wellbeing Kit’ and explains the process they went through to produce the cards

3:10-7:05

The importance of a visual wellbeing resource

7:20-8:00

Discusses the evaluation and ways the My Wellbeing Kit has been used

8:53-49:46

Responds to questions from participants

15:05-21:37

Leigh Arnold

Introduces Dr Astrid Wooton CEO of Flourish Tasmania

22:50-23:50

Astrid Wooton

Explains what she means by mental health

24:16-26:13

Discuss what people can do to look after their mental health

26:46-34:50

Shares how this technique can be used when working with clients and staff members

35:13-38:40

Answers questions from participants

39:28-45:25

Fiona Miller

Graphic artist shares her graphic harvest summary of the session

47:16- 49:37

Resources

Discussion

Participants discussed the following question. Consider what your response would be?

Based on what you heard today or what you have seen in practice, what is one idea/technique you will use to promote mental wellbeing in your work?

Here are just a few responses from session participants:

  • Dance breaks at work
  • Self-reflection and check in (How am I feeling today?)
  • Turn off the phone and laptop etc. on days off
  • Taking time out during a work day. It might only be 10mins
  • I would share the water jug (s) analogy with staff at a meeting, and then see where the discussion takes us
  • Loved peer support training idea for colleagues and participants wanting to become mentors and or peer support
  • In the work place set the ground rules early, communication is all important. Ensure there are safe places to talk to people without consequences
  • I think that the important message to promote is that we are not stuck with our beliefs about how our brains work. We can explore and re-evaluate, an enterprise that is best done in a supportive environment of others working on similar endeavours. I do this through a peer-support weekly group
  • Communication between supervisors and co-workers along with self-reflection and reflection of the issues at hand
  • Lunch time walk- reflection
  • Self-reflection and using supervision sessions if they are available
  • Remembering for myself, and to share with others, the evidence/reasons for doing things that improve mental wellbeing. For example, offices have lots of positive ions and too much time under fluoro lights, on computers etc not good for us. So getting fresh air, taking a break, going somewhere green. Regular moments out throughout the day.
  • Maintaining clear boundaries, journaling and self- reflection
  • Putting up visual reminders to stop and share your "cup" with someone else in the team. Also, we might try to fill in and share some of those Wellbeing cards to give us insights into each other's stress jugs so we can better support each other to de-stress in a way that works for us as we aren't all the same.
  • My colleague and I do a 30 second dance party (no music) throughout the day to encourage movement
  • One idea is to have a soft gentle exercise program available at lunch or before work eg Quigong
  • Have more walking meetings
  • Identify your stress relievers, prioritise practicing these relievers and maintain boundaries. Advocate for a work culture which prioritises individual stress relievers and practice in the workplace.
  • Making time to check in with oneself and colleagues. Take time to process our emotions and thoughts.
  • Encourage non-work related activities - going out for a meal or coffee together where there is no work related talk allowed!
  • Get into body awareness, mindfulness of sensations, watch them come & go

For more information or to register for upcoming sessions visit Healthy Tasmania

Session 3 - Strong partnerships  >

- working from a partnerships model

Healthy Tasmania ‘Listen and Learn’ session three considered the key ingredients needed to form and sustain effective and respectful project partnerships.

Leigh Arnold facilitated the interviews with our two guest presenters, before inviting participants to share in small groups what they could do to strengthen or form a successful partnership.

Fiona Miller captured the content in this great graphic. It is one piece of the puzzle when working to improve health and wellbeing. (click on graphic for larger view)

Session Presentations

Helen Manser, Manager of Jordan River Services spoke about the partnership building process that led to the establishment of Waterbridge Food Coop. She talked of the importance of respect and authenticity.  Helen explained some of the keys to successful partnerships are having clear purpose, careful planning, equal contributions and clear, respectful, regular communication between organisations.

Hayley Tristram, Health Promotion Consultant with the Tasmanian Health Service, introduced the partnership spectrum – that we have informal and formal partnerships, and these are based on relationships. She shared some tips on what works and doesn’t in partnerships, and the non-negotiable elements required to help them thrive.

Speaker

Topic

Time

Leigh Arnold

Introduces Helen Manser, Manager of Jordan River Services

1:42-2:40

Helen Manser

Helen discusses:

Waterbridge Food Co-op project and the need it is meeting

3:05-4:50

Co-op project partnerships and how they evolved and changed

5:00-7:20

The importance of a good foundation for forming partnerships

7:53-8:30

Top tips to form successful partnerships

10:02-10:56

What causes partnerships to go wrong

11:17-12:05

Importance of respectful partnerships

13:07-14:30

Partnership friends that support the Co-op

15:33-17:30

Questions raised by participants

17:40-24:40

Leigh Arnold

Introduces Hayley Tristram, Health Promotion Consultant Tasmanian Health Service

25:36-26:00

Hayley Tristram

Hayley talks about:

Partnerships on the spectrum of relationships and the importance of connection and trust

26:23-27:21

How you can make partnerships successful

28:08-29:42

Discusses the non-negotiable elements of successful formal partnerships

30:10-31:10

What you can do if a professional partnership starts to go wrong and exit strategies

31:18-32:57

A successful professional partnership in Tasmania

34:02-36:28

Answers questions from participants

37:26-45:55

Fiona Miller

Graphic artist shares her graphic harvest summary of the session

46:20-52:08

Resources

Articles

Discussion

Participants discussed the following question. Consider what your response would be?

What is one thing you could do to strengthen or form a successful partnership?

Here are a few responses from session participants:

  • Good communication, trust, respect, keeping it short
  • Authenticity and listening, being true to yourself
  • Trust
  • Long term relationship building, to ensure robust and sustainable partnerships = genuine/authenticity
  • Being open to listening, hearing and recognising ideas and strengths
  • Be aware of your sphere of influence and role modelling in every interaction you have.
  • Personal is primary in Tasmania…the relationship on a personal level is critical to success.
  • Regarding "relationship management" - having multiple connection points to improve opportunities for collaboration across organisations
  • I'd like to do more in appraising risk and mentally budgeting for the real cost of maintaining quality partnerships.
  • Expect speedbumps
  • Listening and understanding what’s important to those you are working with. Respecting diversity, being open/curious
  • Epic fails can promote innovation
  • Don't be afraid to "drop" non-functioning partners. They will probably be just as relieved as you and might come back later for future partnerships.
  • Formalising brings out elements to discuss that you may have made assumptions about prior
  • Think about the spectrum Hayley talked about... relationships / partnerships.
  • Clear and plain language - no jargon
  • Work with integrity
  • KPIs should not be the be-all and end-all. Touching the lives of 1-2 people can have enormous impact in small communities

For more information or to register for upcoming sessions visit Healthy Tasmania

Session 4 - Engaging with community  >

- working with communities in planning, designing and doing

Healthy Tasmania ‘Listen and Learn’ session four considered ways to engage with communities.  Leigh Arnold facilitated the interviews with our two guest presenters before inviting participants to share in small groups how they have, or could, engage with their communities.

Fiona Miller captured the content in this great graphic. It is one piece of the puzzle when working to improve health and wellbeing. (click on graphic for larger view)

Session Presentations

Leez Robertson: Program Manager, Womensport and Recreation Tasmania spoke about the long running Get Active Program (GAP) that has worked with many groups throughout Tasmania.  She talked about the importance of community connection for GAP to be as successful as it is. Local facilitators champion GAP and adapt it to suit their audience. GAP aims to be flexible, inclusive and was designed to be used in many diverse communities.

Denise Delphin: Manager, Northern Suburbs Community Centre drew on her years of experience working with and alongside her community. She talked of the importance of listening and hearing, and ways to keep people connected and informed. She sees her role as supporting communities be the best they can be.

Speaker

Topic

Time

Danielle Louis

Introduces the session and acknowledges country

00.00-2.11

Leigh Arnold

Introduces Leez Robertson and asks his first question: What project are you taking about today?

2.12-4.12

Leez Robertson

Leez talks about:

Get Active Program (GAP). Promotes involvement in physical activity and to consider important issues related to health and wellbeing. Explains the use of local facilitators, and how GAP runs.

4.13-7.07

How GAP is designed and engages different communities.

7.08-8.15

How GAP adapted throughout Covid restrictions.

8.16-10.49

Things don’t always go to plan. Example from Waratah.

10.50-12.39

Leigh asks how do we know GAP is working. Leez discusses evaluative tools & shares some findings.

12.40-16.06

Leigh asks about GAP program running in women’s prison.

16.07-18.11

Questions raised by participants. Leez talks further about evaluation, what data they collect, examples.

18.12-26.04

Leigh Arnold

Introduces Denise Delphin and invites her to talk about NSCC and the communities she works with.

26.45-28.17

Denise

Delphin

Denise talks about:

About NSCC – what it is, who it includes, what they offer in house and part of outreach.

28.18-34.04

Leigh asks Denise for tips to engage with communities.

34.54-36.57

Importance of connecting and informing. Plus strategies during Covid restrictions such as letterboxing.

37.20-40.27

Question re: example of when engagement hasn’t gone so well. Denise shares an example.

40.33-43.20

Back to basics – why is it important to engage with communities.

44.00-45.30

Fiona Miller

Graphic artist shares her visual representation of the session

46:15-50.30

Resources

Here are the resources mentioned in the session that you may find helpful in your work:

Northern Suburbs Community Centre Stories

Discussion

Participants discussed: How have you, or how could you successfully engage a community in a project? Some of their responses are below. What would your response be?

  • Go forth with humility
  • Go where the people and the community leaders are - maybe that's the pub!!
  • Face to face engagement was very successful through church, shopping centre and listen to their feedback and answer their questions following up with flyer
  • Find and engage the champions. Create a coalition and lean on the expertise of those in the community who have already succeeded in this space
  • Talk to people embedded in the community who are successful now, go to the community rather than communicating remotely, develop trusting relationships
  • Reach them where they are through multiple media channels and inviting environments and ensure to follow up with people
  • Talk and listen to community members: face to face. Find some community champions
  • It begins and ends with listening to and communicating with the people you need/want to be involved
  • Ensure that a wide cross section of the community are included - don't neglect certain areas such as the youth or aged etc
  • BE sure not to helicopter in and fly off again. Build a lasting commitment
  • Cultural awareness - CALD and A&TSI communities often fall off the radar
  • Keep asking. "We have a great new program and it would be perfect for you". Research. Network. Letters and images.

For more information or to register for upcoming sessions visit Healthy Tasmania

Session 5 - Telling your story  >

Healthy Tasmania ‘Listen and Learn’ session five explored examples and ideas for story telling.   Leigh Arnold facilitated the panel discussion with the three guest speakers. He then led an activity drafting a story using a template.

Fiona Miller captured the content in this great graphic. It is one piece of the puzzle when working to improve health and wellbeing. (click on graphic for larger view)

Panel presentation

This session had three speakers presenting on why story telling is important, ways to tell your story, tips for capturing a story and sharing it, and examples.

Diane Rawlings, Education Leader, King Island Childcare and Early Learning Centre shared the story of the Growing Healthy Children on King Island project. The story about this was captured with the support of a media company. Diane talked about how she thought story telling would be hard, but she has learnt it is within reach. Diane also talked about stories honouring community involvement.

Yvette Hufschmidt, Healthy Tasmania Project officer, Public Health Services discussed how she uses stories in the work she does. She also discussed a story telling roadmap and canvas as tools to help tell stories.

Rebecca Essex, Health Promotion Coordinator, Tasmanian Health Services discussed the ‘Inspiring Health Promotion Stories’ project she is facilitating. She talked about telling stories that inspire, are respectful and help people learn.

Speaker

Topic

Time

Mara Schneiders

Introduces the session and acknowledges country

00.00-2.10

Leigh Arnold

Introduces himself, goes over the format for the session, talks about zoom, introduces Fiona the graphic artist.

2.11-6.56

Leigh

Introduces the 3 panelists

6.57-10.02

Diane Rawlings

Talks about the project on King Island – what it was, why, and what benefits it had.

10.03 – 13.02

Rebecca Essex

Outlines the Inspiring Health Promotion Stories Project

13.03-14.25

Leigh

Reinforces we all have stories

14.26-14.48

Yvette

Hufschmidt

Discusses how stories are being used within Healthy Tasmania.

14.49-15.38

Leigh

Asks the panel about the benefits of using a storytelling approach. Diane, Rebecca, then Yvette respond providing a range of reasons.

15.39-18.26

Leigh

Summary, reminder of links, invites & asks questions

18.27-19.14

Q: ‘How do you create stories to promote the work you do? How do you do it?

Yvette talks about storytelling roadmap and canvas. How HT building a library of stories. Map stories.

19.15-19.29

19.30-22.32

Rebecca talks about the storytelling template they are using, including how they work with people to complete the template.

23.13-24.14

Diane talks about speaking from the heart.

24.15-25.06

Q: What are the important elements of a story?

Diane : process, goal, action, success.

Rebecca: Engaging heads and hearts. To inspire & learn. Working with people to tell a story.

Yvette: Relatable, paint a rich picture, know your audience.

25.33-25.55

25.56-26.59

27.00-28.37

KI story

Yvette and Diane talk about visuals within storytelling

29.20-30.53

Q: re different platforms

Panelists share examples and ideas re platforms for storytelling

30.55-33.15

Q: re stories of failure

Panelists discuss this angle, the learning that comes

33.20-36.05

Q: re process of telling story / how hard is it?

Di talked about community project, power of capturing that story. Yvette talks about building storytelling culture.

Rebecca talks about planning & having respect for storyteller.

36.30-43.14

Q: importance of emotion

Di talks of collaboration, Rebecca discusses creating empathy and connection, Yvette talks of connection being empowering.

Rebecca also talks about emotional reaction, focus on change.

43.45-47.20

Leigh

Leads participants in activity to draft a story. Shows an overview, and then a video as an example of a good story with discussion on how people found it.

48.00-1.00

Leigh with group

Two participants share their draft stories.

1.00.28-1.06.49

Fiona Miller

Graphic artist shares her visual representation of the session

1.06.50-1.12.51

Leigh/Mara

Thank you and close

1.12.52-1.15.13

Resources:

King Island story

To find out more about Inspiring Stories and request the story template, email Rebecca on rebecca.essex@ths.tas.gov.au

Stronger than Stigma’ – Ben Shrivens. Example of a story promoting wellbeing.

Chosen as a good example of a story with the following elements:

  • Purpose
  • Character
  • Conflict (challenges, problems, issues, difficulty)
  • Action. What did the character do?
  • Result. The outcome, benefit, meaning.
  • Call to action. What do you want others to do?

Failing forward: how to encourage sharing of what is not working

See other topics in the Listen and Learn series at Healthy Tasmania

Session 6 - Seeing the big picture  >

- working in a systems thinking way

The final of the Healthy Tasmania ‘Listen and Learn’ sessions focused on seeing the big picture, including looking at systems thinking as an approach to our work.

Leigh Arnold facilitated the discussion with our two experienced guest speakers – Professor James Vickers, and Michelle Morgan. Michelle led an activity exploring perspective.

Fiona Miller captured the content in this great graphic. It is one piece of the puzzle when working to improve health and wellbeing. (click on graphic for larger view)

Speakers

Professor James Vickers, Head of the Tasmanian School of Medicine and Director of the Wicking Dementia Research and Education Centre, talked about The Island Project. A wonderful example of a largescale project exploring dementia prevention in Tasmania. James spoke about modifiable and non-modifiable risks, and the work the project team are doing to understand and reduce dementia.

Michelle Morgan, Healthy Communities Officer, Public Health Services talked about what systems thinking is and shared some practical ways it can be used in our work.

Speaker

Topic

Time

Mara Schneiders

Introduces the session and acknowledges country

00.00-1.56

Leigh Arnold

Introduces himself, goes over the format for the session, talks about zoom, introduces Fiona the graphic artist.

1.57-4.46

Leigh

Introduces Professor James Vickers

Asks James about the Island Project.

4.47-5.49

5.50-5.57

James Vickers

Talks about the Island Project… what it is, and how ageing and degenerative disease is a public health issues. Why Island Project established, i.e modifiable risks for dementia. James shares what being part of the Island Project looks like. Approx 12,000 people involved in Tasmania. Aiming for 20,000.

5.58-9.58

Leigh

Q: Today discussing Big Picture system, how is island Project relevant to this?

9.59-10.27

James Vickers

James talks about alerting people to risk factors. Goal to engage a wide range of people, and flow on effect.

10.28-11.44

Leigh

Q: How long has project been running and what have you discovered so far?

11.45-12.09

James Vickers

Talks about who is involved, and how to connect with wider range. Considers some surprising data related to risks improving during Covid restrictions.

12.10-14.51

Responds to question about modifiable and non-modifiable risk factors.

14.52-17.02

Talks about plans to focus on modifiable risks

17.03-18.16

Talks about hearing loss, dementia and social isolation

18.17-21.46

Responds to query if younger people be involved in future.

21.47-23.00

Discusses who else is part of Island/partners

23.01-24.36

Leigh

Introduces Michelle Morgan & asks what systems thinking is.

25.35-26.45

Michelle Morgan

Gives overview about what Systems Thinking is.

We are all part of many systems. Gives examples.

Why looking at system is useful.

26.46-29.30

Talks about different kinds of problems with examples, and how systems thinking can be used.

29.31-32.09

Shares how people can use systems thinking in their work. Gives examples of practices. Also talks about how we contribute/influence systems. Our role.

32.10-36.14

Talks about specific practice of engaging diverse perspectives, working with others. Shares story of elephant and blind folk.

36.15-39.29

Comment about complexity of creating maps. Michelle gives example related to obesity.

40.06-41.30

Refers to Systems Thinking flyer & Systems School as resources. Discusses tools to support creating maps including causal loop diagrams.

42.00-44.49

Fiona Miller

Fiona shows the graphic design she did of the session, summarising the points made

45.39-49.56

Leigh

Wrap up

49.57-52.02

Mara

Thanks and close. Reminder of Listen and Learn recordings available on Healthy Tasmania website.

52.03-end

Resources:

Here are the resources mentioned in the session that you may find helpful in your work:

  1. One of you put forward a complex problem.
  2. That person to say briefly what the problem is and their perspective.
  3. Whole group to identify three other people with a different perspective.
  4. Whole group to discuss how those other people might see the problem and their concerns.

See other topics in the Listen and Learn series at Healthy Tasmania